366 days of gratitude

August 19, 2016

Last Saturday the Otago Daily Times showcased young people from every secondary school in its circulation area in its annual celebration of achievement, Class Act.

It also caught up with some of 2006’s Class Act award recipients.

Today the paper covered last night’s award presentation.

Prime Minister John Key praised the 57 pupils from 29 secondary schools during the 2016 Otago Daily Times Class Act awards ceremony at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery yesterday.

He described the recipients as “talented, inquisitive, articulate and outward thinking”.

“I think New Zealand is in great hands when you look at the young people who are here.”

List of recipients here

He had attended every Class Act ceremony since becoming prime minister eight years ago, and former prime minister  Helen Clark had been to the first nine ceremonies. . . 

Mr Key said he valued the Otago Daily Times initiative showcasing the talent of young people.

“I can’t think of anything I’ve been to eight years in a row … but I wanted to come every year, as I’m sure Helen Clark did, because we wanted to celebrate young people and we want to send a message they are doing really well.”

Mr Key told the pupils how ability counted for something but attitude counted for more and he encouraged them to back themselves and work hard. . . 

Class Act is a wonderful initiative by the ODT.

It celebrates hard work , talent and achievement in a variety of fields and is a reminder that the future will be in good hands.

I’m grateful for all of that.


Word of the day

August 19, 2016

Tweedle –  to sing or whistle in modulation; pipe, chirp; to produce high-pitched, modulated sounds, as a singer, bird, or musical instrument; to play negligently on a musical instrument; to lure by or as by music.


Bronze

August 19, 2016

Tom Walsh won the bronze medal in the shot put.

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New Zealand is now 17th in the medal tally with four gold, eight silver and three bronze.

We were second on the medals per capita table before Walsh won the bronze.

The total of 15 is the best yet for the country.


Ruralround-up

August 19, 2016

Flaws to idea of reducing dairy herd – Jacqueline Rowarth:

A suggestion that New Zealand should remove 80per cent of dairy cows to return to a natural environment overlooks various fundamental problems including: what is natural?

Dairy farms tend to be in flat to rolling countryside where grass grows well and cows can create milk efficiently.

It is in this country that clear mountain streams become winding rivers, picking up sediment and nutrients from the soils through which they are travelling. As they slow down, plants and fish have a chance to grow.

Dairying occupies 1.7 million hectares of New Zealand’s 26.8 million hectares. This area, with the associated processing and value adding, resulted in export revenue for the year to June 2015 of $14 billion.

In some contrast, sheep, beef and deer farms cover 11.5 million hectares of mostly somewhat steeper land, and bring in $9 billion. . .

Lamb price spike to be brief – Alan Williams:

Sheep farmers could get $6/kg or more for a lamb this season – but only briefly.

The shortage of lambs also meant many farmers would not be able to take full advantage of the short-lived spike, AgriHQ analyst Mel Croad said.

Some overseas markets were prepared to pay up for lambs, knowing there was a NZ shortage and she believed that might push South Island procurement prices to $6/kg and the North Island to $6.10/$6.20 in October and November. . .

Buyers caught napping by possible milk production decline – Gerard Hutching:

A milk futures broker says whole milk powder buyers have been “caught napping” by a potential shortfall in the product, explaining why the price has risen 28.8 per cent at the last two global dairy auctions.

Director of OM Financial Nigel Brunel said the price hike had been “staggering” and taken everyone by surprise.

“Buyers haven’t been able to source WMP at the right price and have been concerned that New Zealand supply could be well down this season. They have been caught napping in a sleepy sideways WMP market for almost a year,” Brunel said.

As a result the buyers had climbed over each other to source WMP and lifted the price.

North Canterbury’s bumper lamb crop hanging on for rain – Tony Benny:

Warm, settled weather and plenty of twins on the ground makes for the sort of lambing farmers treasure but after two years of drought, North Canterbury farmers are just worried about how they’ll feed the extra mouths. Tony Benny reports.

The countryside around Hawarden, North Canterbury, looks a picture.  The sky is clear, the air is still and warm, the paddocks are green, dotted with hundreds of healthy lambs and on the horizon are snow-capped mountains.

But talk to locals like Lew Wright and his son Iain and it becomes clear that they’re just hanging on, unsure how they’ll feed their bumper crop of lambs, let alone the 600 ewe hoggets due to come home from grazing in the next couple of weeks.

“The paddocks have got nothing in them, they’re just bare, they’ve just got no grass.  It’s scary,” says Iain. . . 


Friday’s answers

August 19, 2016

Andrei gets my thanks for posing Thursday’s questions.

Should you have stumped us all you can claim a virtual batch of ginger crunch by leaving the answers below.

You also get a bonus virtual batch of shortbread for the topic. My father came from Dundee and a picture of the old Tay Bridge hung on the wall in my parents’ sitting room.

I knew of William McGonagall and his notoriety (Dunedin has an annual bad poetry competition in his honour). But I didn’t know about the Tay Bridge poem.


Bronze, 2 silver, gold

August 19, 2016

Lisa Carrington became the first New Zealand woman to win two medals at the same Olympics when she won a bronze medal in the K1 500 this morning.

That follows her gold in the 200 two days ago and in doing so she joins Valerie Adams and Barbara Kendall in an elite group of women who’ve won three Olympic medals.

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Team Jolly, Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie sailed to silver in the 470 class, a remarkable feat after coming back from two disqualifications.

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Molly Meech and Alex Maloney also sailed to silver in the 49er FX class.

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Peter Burling and Blair Tuke didn’t even have to turn up today to win gold in the sailing 49er. They were already so far ahead of the next contenders but they not only turned up they won the race.

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New Zealand is now 14th in medals per country.


Quote of the day

August 19, 2016

If you don’t want to work you have to work to earn enough money so that you won’t have to work. – Ogden Nash who was born on this day in 1902.

He also said:

I have an idea that the phrase ‘weaker sex’ was coined by some woman to disarm the man she was preparing to overwhelm.

And:

I think that I shall never see a billboard lovely as a tree. Perhaps, unless the billboards fall, I’ll never see a tree at all.

And:

Progress might have been alright once, but it has gone on too long.

And:

To keep your marriage brimming, With love in the loving cup, Whenever you’re wrong, admit it; Whenever you’re right, shut up.

And:

People who work sitting down get paid more than people who work standing up.

And:

I do not like to get the news, because there has never been an era when so many things were going so right for so many of the wrong persons.

And:

Do you think my mind is maturing late, or simply rotted early?

 


August 19 in history

August 19, 2016

1504 Battle of Knockdoe.

1561 An 18-year-old Mary, Queen of Scots, returned to Scotland after spending 13 years in France.

1612  The “Samlesbury witches“, three women from  Samlesbury, were put on trial, accused for practising witchcraft, one of the most famous witch trials in English history.

1631  John Dryden, English poet, was born  (d. 1700).

1666  Second Anglo-Dutch War: Rear Admiral Robert Holmes led a raid on the Dutch island of Terschelling, destroying 150 merchant ships, an act later known as “Holmes’s Bonfire“.

1689 Samuel Richardson, English writer, was born  (d. 1761).
1692 Salem witch trials:  one woman and four men, including a clergyman, were executed after being convicted of witchcraft.

1745  Prince Charles Edward Stuart raised his standard in Glenfinnan – the start of the Second Jacobite Rebellion, known as “the 45″.

1768 Saint Isaac’s Cathedral was founded in Saint Petersburg.

1772  Gustavus III of Sweden staged a Coup d’état, in which he assumed power and enacted a new constitution that divided power between the Riksdag and the King.

1782 American Revolutionary War: Battle of Blue Licks – the last major engagement of the war, almost ten months after the surrender of the British commander Lord Cornwallis.

1812 War of 1812: American frigate USS Constitution defeated the British frigate HMS Guerriere off the coast of Nova Scotia, earning her nickname “Old Ironsides”.

1813  Gervasio Antonio de Posadas joined Argentina’s second triumvirate.

1835 – Tom Wills, Australian cricketer and umpire, co-founded Australian rules football, was born (d. 1880).

1839  Presentation of Jacque Daguerre’s new photographic process to the French Academy of Sciences.

1853 Edward Gibbon Wakefield was elected to the New Zealand Parliament.

Wakefield elected to Parliament

1861 First ascent of Weisshorn, fifth highest summit in the Alps.

1871 – Orville Wright, American engineer and pilot, co-founded the Wright Company, was born (d. 1948).

1883 Coco Chanel, French clothing designer, was born  (d. 1971).

1895 American frontier murderer and outlaw, John Wesley Hardin, was killed by an off-duty policeman in a saloon in El Paso.

1902 Ogden Nash, American poet, was born  (d. 1971).

1919 Afghanistan gained full independence from the United Kingdom.

1927  Metropolitan Sergius proclaimed the declaration of loyalty of the Russian Orthodox Church to the Soviet state.

1928 Bernard Levin, English journalist, author, and broadcaster, was born  (d. 2004).

1930 Frank McCourt, Irish-American author, was born  (d. 2009).

1934  The first All-American Soap Box Derby was held in Dayton, Ohio.

1934  The creation of the position Führer was approved by the German electorate with 89.9% of the popular vote.

1939 Ginger Baker, English musician (Cream), was born.

1940 Johnny Nash, American singer-songwriter, was born.

1940 First flight of the B-25 Mitchell medium bomber.

1942  Operation Jubilee – the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division led an amphibious assault by allied forces on Dieppe, France and failed.

1943 – Sid Going, New Zealand rugby player, was born.

1944  As his damaged Hawker Typhoon fighter-bomber rapidly lost height,Pilot Officer James Stellin struggled to avoid crashing into Saint-Maclou-la-Brière, a village of 370 people in the Seine-Maritime region. He succeeded, but at the cost of his own life.

Kiwi pilot's sacrifice saves French village

1944  Liberation of Paris – Paris rose against German occupation with the help of Allied troops.

1944  – Jack Canfield, American author, was born.

1945   Viet Minh led by Ho Chi Minh took power in Hanoi.

1946 Bill Clinton, 42nd President of the United States, was born.

1950 – Jennie Bond, English journalist and author, was born.

1951 John Deacon, English musician (Queen), was born.

1953  Cold War: the CIA helped to overthrow the government of Mohammed Mossadegh in Iran and reinstated the Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi.

1955 – Patricia Scotland, Baroness Scotland of Asthal, Dominican-English lawyer and politician, UK Attorney General, Commonwealth Secretary-General, was born.

1955 In the Northeast United States, severe flooding caused by Hurricane Diane, claimed 200 lives.

1960  Cold War: in Moscow, downed American U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers was sentenced to ten years imprisonment by the Soviet Union for espionage.

1960  Sputnik 5 – the Soviet Union launched the satellite with the dogs Belka and Strelka, 40 mice, 2 rats and a variety of plants.

1973 – Mette-Marit, Crown Princess of Norway, was born.

1980  Saudia Flight 163, a Lockheed L-1011 TriStar burned after making an emergency landing at King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh killing 301 people.

1981  Gulf of Sidra Incident: United States fighters intercepted and shot down two Libyan Sukhoi Su-22 fighter jets over the Gulf of Sidra.

1987  Hungerford Massacre: Michael Ryan killed sixteen people with an assault rifle and then committed suicide.

1989  Polish president Wojciech Jaruzelski nominated Solidarity activistTadeusz Mazowiecki to be the first non-communist Prime Minister in 42 years.

1989  Raid on offshore pirate station, Radio Caroline in North Sea by British and Dutch governments.

1989 Several hundred East Germans crossed the frontier between Hungary and Austria during the Pan-European Picnic, part of the events which began the process of the Fall of the Berlin Wall.

1990  Leonard Bernstein conducted his final concert, ending with Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7.

1991  Collapse of the Soviet Union, August Coup: Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev was placed under house arrest..

1991  Hurricane Bob hit the Northeast, United States.

1999  Tens of thousands of Serbians rallied to demand the resignation of Federal Republic of Yugoslavia President Slobodan Milošević.

2002 A Russian Mi-26 helicopter carrying troops was hit by a Chechen missile killing 118 soldiers.

2003 A car-bomb attack on United Nations headquarters in Iraq killed the agency’s top envoy Sergio Vieira de Mello and 21 other employees.

2003  A Hamas planned suicide attack on a bus in Jerusalem killed 23 Israelis, 7 of them children in the Jerusalem bus 2 massacre.

2005 The first-ever joint military exercise between Russia and China, called Peace Mission 2005 began.

2005 A series of strong storms lashed Southern Ontario spawning several tornadoes as well as creating extreme flash flooding in Toronto and its surrounding communities. .

2009  A series of bombings in Baghdad, killed 101 and injured 565 others.

2010 – Operation Iraqi Freedom ended, with the last of the United States brigade combat teams crossing the border to Kuwait.

2012 – A plane crash killed 32 people in Sudan.

2013 – A train accident in India killed at least 37 people and injured more than 12.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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