366 days of gratitude

August 13, 2016

What’s the secret to a happy marriage?

The answers to that question could be many and varied. They could also be complicated.

But it doesn’t have to be.

How about: communication, consideration, cooperation, kindness, laughter, love.

It really can be that simple and I’m grateful for that.


Word of the day

August 13, 2016

Conurbation – an extended urban area, typically consisting of several towns merging with the suburbs of a central city;  an extensive urban area resulting from the expansion of several cities or towns so that they coalesce but usually retain their separate identities; a predominantly urban region including adjacent towns and suburbs; a metropolitan area; an extremely large, densely populated urban area, usually a complex of suburbs and smaller towns together with the large city at their centre.


Silver for Aadams

August 13, 2016

Valerie Adams has won a silver medal in the shot put.

TVNZ’s commentary:

1.01pm: Carter from US first up with a throw of 19.12m.

1.06am: Adams’ first throw is 19.79m. Went a little high for her liking.

1:12pm: Everyone has thrown now, and Adams remains in front. They have three throws each before eight more go onto the next phase. 

1.13pm: WOW! Carter from the US has thrown 19.82m. She leads Adams by 3cm.

1.15pm: DOUBLE WOW! Adams goes HUGE. 20.42m to retake the lead! What does that say to the rest of the field?

1.21pm: End of the second round. Adams leads by 60cm over Carter of the US.

1.22pm: Carter’s third effort can’t beat her second.

1.24pm: Third throw for Adams, short of 20m. 19.80. She remains in front.

1.31pm: Three throws down, three to go. Adams in front. Four athletes are cut for the rest of the competition.

1.39pm: Going in reverse order now. Carter improves her best to 19.87m.

1.40pm: Adams went quick, and wasn’t happy. She walks out of the circle so is red flagged.

1.45pm: Penultimate throw for Adams. Short of 20m again. Carter is her only serious rival, but can’t get over 20m.

1.52pm: NO! Carter goes huge. Adams pushed into second!

1.57pm: That, ladies and gentlemen, is the beauty of sport. Adams looked to have wrapped up the gold with her second throw of 20.42m, but Michelle Carter of the US pulled out an astonishing effort of 20.63m. Adams couldn’t beat it with her last effort.

2.04pm: It’s going to take a while for this to sink it. But let’s appreciate Carter’s performance for a second. Her last throw, her last chance of winning, and she delivers something special.

That leaves New Zealand in 19th place with a medal tally of one gold and six silver.

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Saturday’s smiles

August 13, 2016

A farmer had noticed one of her staff had got into the habit of arriving late.

“It’s a strange thing, Jock, you’re always late in the mornings when you live right here on the farm yet Sue who lives five kilometres away always arrives on time.”

“That’s all very well, boss,” Jock said. “If Sue’s running a wee bit late in the morning she can drive faster so she arrives sooner but when I’m late I’m already here.”


Rowing silver

August 13, 2016

New Zealand rowing pair Genevieve Behrent and Rebecca Scown have won silver.

They finished just 1.28 seconds behind Great Britain.

Patience and self-belief have powered Kiwi rowers Rebecca Scown and Genevieve Behrent to an Olympic silver medal that could so nearly have been a momentous gold.

Trailing the field through the first 500m in the women’s pair final, the New Zealanders knocked their opponents off one-by-one but ran out of time to catch defending champions Helen Glover and Heather Stanning of Great Britain on Friday (Saturday NZ Time). . . 

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Genevieve and Rebecca are also in the New Zealand rowing eight.

Weather disruption to the schedule for the heats meant they had only 10 minutes between finishing their pairs race and starting the eights race.

The final of the eights will be raced tomorrow morning.

New Zealand is now 19th in the medal tally with one gold and five silvers.


Saturday soapbox

August 13, 2016

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.

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I have never understood why it is ‘greed’ to keep the money you have earned but not greed to want to take somebody else’s money – Thomas Sowell.


August 13 in history

August 13, 2016

1516  The Treaty of Noyon between France and Spain was signed. Francis recognised Charles’s claim to Naples, and Charles recognises Francis’s claim to Milan.

1521 Tenochtitlán (present day Mexico City) fell to conquistador Hernán Cortés.

1536  Buddhist monks from Kyōto’s Enryaku Temple set fire to 21 Nichirentemples throughout Kyoto in the Tenbun Hokke Disturbance.

1553  Michael Servetus was arrested by John Calvin in Geneva as a heretic.

1704  War of the Spanish Succession: Battle of Blenheim – English and Austrians wona gainst French and Bavarians.

1790 William Wentworth, Australian explorer and politician, was born (d. 1872).

1792   Louis XVI of France was formally arrested by the National Tribunal, and declared an enemy of the people.

1814  The Convention of London, a treaty between the United Kingdom and the United Provinces, was signed in London.

1818 Lucy Stone, American suffragette, was born  (d. 1893).

1831 Nat Turner saw a solar eclipse, which he believed was a sign from God.

1852 (1855 or 1856 – exact date unknown) – Caroline Freeman, teacher, school principal and owner,  and first female to graduate from the University of Otago, was born (d. 1914).

1860 Annie Oakley, American sharpshooter, was born. (d. 1926)

1888 John Logie Baird, Scottish television pioneer, was born (d. 1946).

1889  German Ferdinand von Zeppelin patented his “Navigable Balloon“.

1899 Alfred Hitchcock, English film director, was born (d. 1980).

1907 Sir Basil Spence, Scottish architect, was born (d. 1976).

1913  Otto Witte, an acrobat, was purportedly crowned King of Albania.

1913  First production in the UK of stainless steel by Harry Brearley.

1918  Opha Mae Johnson became the first woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps.

1918 Bayerische Motoren Werke AG (BMW) established as a public company.

1920 Polish-Soviet War: Battle of Warsaw began.

1926 Fidel Castro, Cuban revolutionary and politician, was born.

1937 Battle of Shanghai began.

1940  Battle of Britain began.

1951 Dan Fogelberg, American singer/songwriter, was born (d. 2007).

1960 The Central African Republic declared independence from France.

1961 The German Democratic Republic closed the border between the eastern and western sectors of Berlin, to thwart its inhabitants’ attempts to escape to the West.

1968 Alexandros Panagoulis attempted to assassinate the Greek dictatorColonel G. Papadopoulos.

1969 The Apollo 11 astronauts were released from a three-week quarantine to enjoy a ticker-tape parade in New York. That evening, at a state dinner in Los Angeles, they were awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Richard Nixon.

1978  150 Palestinians in Beirut were killed in a terrorist attack.

1979  The roof of the uncompleted Rosemont Horizon near Chicago, Illinois collapsed, killing 5 workers and injuring 16.

2004   Hurricane Charley, a Category 4 storm, struck Punta Gorda, Florida.

2004  156 Congolese Tutsi refugees massacred at the Gatumba refugee camp in Burundi.

2005 Former NZ Prime Minister David Lange died.

Death of David Lange

2008 Michael Phelps set the Olympic record for most the gold medals won by an individual in Olympic history with his win in the men’s 200m butterfly.

2010  – The MV Sun Sea docked in CFB Esquimalt, British Columbia, Canada, carrying 492 Sri Lankan Tamils.

2011 – The main stage collapsed at the Indiana State Fair during a hurricane-force wind gust ahead of an approaching severe thunderstorm, killing 7 and injuring 45.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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