366 days of gratitude

June 6, 2016

Farms don’t follow a nine-to-five working day or a five-day working week. Even so, weekends are usually quieter and long weekends provide an excuse to do as much or as little as you want.

I began the day with a longish (10km) walk, am finishing it with a good book (Everyone Brave is Forgiven  by Chris Cleave) and I’m grateful for both.

UPDATE – whoops, just realised I’ve done two gratitude posts today. Must count my blessings there’s so much for which I”m grateful. 🙂


366 days of gratitude

June 6, 2016

We had to be in Pahiatua last Tuesday and in Wanaka first thing on Wednesday.

We’d planned to fly from and to Queenstown but discovered the timing wouldn’t work.

That left us going from and back to Christchurch with a five to six-hour drive to Wanaka through roads prone to ice and snow.

The travel gods were with us, though.

We had a clear run back to Wellington, managed to get an earlier flight than planned, collected the car and were on the road just after 5pm.

We stopped for kebabs at Tinwald and drove on through the rain, watching the temperature dropping from six degrees and wondering what was ahead of us.

The rain stopped at Fairlie but the temperature kept dropping and reached zero just before Tekapo where we encountered sleet.

Thankfully that was localised, the temperature was back up to 2 degrees and the sky cleared a few kilometres on.

Snow was piled at the side of the road through the Lindis but the road itself was clear.

Coming back home yesterday, a sign warned of ice but again the road was fine.

It’s been a bad weekend for crashes but the roads we travelled weren’t busy and were clear and I’m grateful for that.


Word of the day

June 6, 2016

Coggler  a person who applies cogs or a cog design to make simple cosmetic changes to an object without fundamentally altering it or adding function; walk unsteadily, as of small children.


Rural round-up

June 6, 2016

Merino work recognised – Sally Rae:

Bill Gibson, the elder statesman of the merino industry, has been recognised for his vast contribution to the breed.

Mr Gibson, who lives in Wanaka, was presented with the Heather Perriam Memorial Trophy at the Otago Merino Association’s recent merino excellence awards in Queenstown.

In presenting the award, Mrs Perriam’s husband John said it was a privilege to present the trophy to someone who was deserving of it “in every possible way”. . . 

Double-header for Ginger at the sheep dog trials – Hamish MacLean:

It has been a big week for Omarama farmer Ginger Anderson.

Not only did the 70-year-old win the short head and yard national title with Don at the New Zealand dog trial championships at Omarama on Saturday, but he was also named a life member of the New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association.

Now a four-time national champion, the 15th life member of the association, who for 12 years served on the judging panel, had no plans on ending his days of competing in the sport. . . 

Farmers satisfied with banks but pressure building for some:

Farmers overall remain satisfied with their banks, but pressure is building and sharemilkers are feeling it most a Federated Farmers survey has revealed.

The Federated Farmers Banking Survey, which is undertaken quarterly to gauge the relationship farmers hold with their banks, has indicated that perceptions about ‘undue pressure’ have gradually built.

Federated Farmers Dairy chairman Andrew Hoggard says that it comes at no surprise considering the current environment.

“Despite sharemilkers being particularly exposed at present bank satisfaction remains strong overall.” . . 

Dual role at Feds for multi-talented farmer:

Federated Farmers newest provincial president Simon Williamson is used to flying high and has taken the reins of both Federated Farmers High Country Industry Group and North Otago Province.

The high country farmer, who also holds a pilot licence and is president of the local jockey club, joined the Federation 13 years ago. He recently took over as Federated Farmers’ High Country Chairman from Chas Todhunter, and at the North Otago provincial Annual General Meeting this week, he was elected provincial president. He replaces Richard Strowger.

Federated Farmers President William Rolleston said: “Simon is an incredibly passionate advocate for the farming community and I know he will do a fantastic job.” . . 

Speech by Guy Wigley, Chairman of Federated Farmers Arable Industry Group at the Arable Industry Conference in Ashburton:

The past 12 months have been a rollercoaster.  The year started quietly with no biosecurity incursions – life seemed to be dominated by the price of milk – then along came velvetleaf. 

This is not specifically an arable industry weed as it is across all farming types and the arable industry will be able to manage this weed better than most.  However, it highlights how crucial biosecurity is to the wellbeing of our industry and the country as a whole. 

The Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) has done an outstanding job in its response to the velvetleaf incursion mobilising large numbers of staff from its networks with the aim of eradicating velvetleaf from New Zealand. . . 

Board cut in doubt – Hugh Stringleman:

The 75% yes vote needed for Fonterra’s constitutional changes to governance and representation will be close and might fail to attract sufficient support.  

Fonterra’s area managers have hit the telephones, asking if farmers need any more meetings.  Chairman John Wilson acknowledged many shareholders were uncertain about the change to the voting process.

 “(We) recommend you support the different process as we are very confident it will give the outcomes the co-operative is looking for. . . 

Flood farmers still recovering – Richard Rennie:

Shaun O’Leary’s racehorse did not earn a Melbourne Cup win last November to pay for the damage the June floods inflicted on his property at Whangaehu.  

Nevertheless, O’Leary retains his optimism about horses and farming with a refreshingly optimistic and philosophical mindset.  

The family runs 690ha in the hard-hit Whangaehu Valley southwest of Whanganui, milking 1500 cows on the flats alongside the Whangaehu River. .  .

The economics of butterfly farming:

Karl Rich has been helping to farm an altogether more delicate animal than those usually associated with agribusiness.

The Lincoln University Agribusiness and International Development Associate Professor was recently part of a multi-disciplinary, international group of researchers looking to develop an innovative approach to conservation in India — butterfly farming.

The group wants to aid conservation of butterflies in Western Ghats, “an area with some of the highest levels of biodiversity in the world and one threatened by unsustainable agricultural and land use patterns,” Associate Professor Rich says.

He says in developing countries conservation efforts can be very challenging. . . 

Gateplates & Signs's photo.


Bob Berry MNZM

June 6, 2016

Whitestone Cheese founder Bob Berry has been awarded an MNZM for services to the industry.

Mr Berry, who is semi-retired and lives at Lakes Hayes, said he was delighted to accept the award on behalf of all those who had contributed to the boutique cheese-making enterprise.

The company employs 60 people and Whitestone is a recognised brand in the United States, Australia and the Pacific.

Mr Berry was born on D-Day 1944, was brought up in Karitane, attended Waitaki Boys’ High School and on leaving school worked for stock and station agency Dalgety and Co.

He began farming a hill country property near Waikouaiti in 1972 and bought another farm at Maheno in 1982.

Mr Berry and his wife, Sue, decided to diversify into cheesemaking in 1987 during the rural downturn.

“I was sick of being a price-taker rather than a price-maker,” Mr Berry said.

“A lot of farmers exited farming during the ’80s and started all sorts of enterprises.”

Mr and Mrs Berry set up their cheese-making factory in a garage with the help of Evansdale Cheese founder Colin Dennison, and slowly built up their knowledge base by employing cheesemakers from Europe and elsewhere in New Zealand.

“All have contributed something to our recipes and the regional styles we have developed.”

The company was now putting out more cheese per day than it did during its entire first year, processing about 55,000 litres of milk a week.

Mr Berry said his favourite cheese was the company’s “flagship” Windsor blue.

He was a founding member of the New Zealand Specialist Cheesemakers Association, served as chairman for five years and is a life member.

He continues to sponsor many community initiatives through the company, including contributions to and sponsorship of the Oamaru Opera House and the Alps to Ocean cycle trail.

Whitestone Cheese is now run by his son, Simon.

This is  well deserved recognition for service to the industry, business in general and the community.

Other southern rural people honoured include:

Stewart Barrnett, who received an ONZM for services to agriculture and business.

Mr Barnett (73), who spent 34 years with the former PPCS, now Silver Fern Farms, 22 of them as chief executive, said he was extraordinarily lucky to work for a farmers co-operative during his career as it gave him the chance to meet many people in the industry.

He also played a role on New Zealand producer boards, particularly the meat and deer industry boards.

“The meat industry involved me fully; it was constantly evolving.” . . .

Bev  Clark received an MNZM for services to health.

A champion of health services in southern rural towns, Bev Clark, of Wanaka, has been made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Born in Winton in 1942, and now retired from her various health advocacy roles, Mrs Clark has a long history of fighting to retain and improve health services.

While farming at Hokonui, in Southland, with husband the late Boyd Clark, Mrs Clark became involved in the successful battle to retain, and improve, maternity services in Winton, spending eight years as chairwoman of the Central Southland Health Trust and the Winton Birthing Unit.

Mrs Clark said last week, at one point her husband joked she should move her bed to the unit because of the amount of time she was spending there.

In the late 1990s, Mrs Clark became involved in an even bigger battle, to retain and upgrade Clyde’s very rundown Dunstan Hospital.

As chairwoman of the board of Central Otago Health Services Ltd, she was one of those who took on Labour health minister Annette King.

In 2003, the board threatened to resign over the state of the hospital, and Mrs Clark recalled being accused of “blackmailing” the government and being described by Ms King as “petulant”.

But a public meeting of 1000 people backed the board and the government agreed to put in $7.6million, with the community adding about $3million more.

Mrs Clark has served as a director on the Southern Regional Health Authority and the Health Funding Authority, has chaired the Consumer Liaison Committee for the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners and was a council member of their division of Rural Hospital Medicine.

She also spent six years on the New Zealand Psychologists Board.

Mrs Clark is a marriage and funeral celebrant in Wanaka and is a founding executive member, treasurer and life member of the Celebrants Association in New Zealand. . . 

She has more than earned recognition for the years of work fighting for and helping to maintain and run rural health services.

Stuart Heal, a former CEO of the rural co-operative CRT received an MNZM for services to cricket andd the community.

Dr Garry Nixon regards his MNZM as recognition of the importance of rural hospital medicine as a specialty.

 . . .Dr Nixon (55), of Alexandra, has been a medical officer and rural hospital doctor at Dunstan Hospital since 1992 and was instrumental in establishing rural hospital medicine as a specialty.

He has served as a researcher, teacher and lecturer in rural health at the University of Otago and has introduced several specialty training modules to benefit rural patients.

One of those modules – the certificate of clinician-performed ultrasound programme – has been recognised as a world-class programme of special benefit in remote rural areas.

Dr Nixon was made a Distinguished Fellow of the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners in 2010.

In 2014, he was appointed chairman of the university’s health science division’s rural working party and, in 2015, he was made the director of the postgraduate rural medical programmes at the Dunedin School of Medicine.

His aim is to promote the vocation of rural hospital medicine to ensure the career is sustainable and attractive to doctors in the future.

“What gives me the most satisfaction is the opportunity to work with young doctors as they’ve been coming through – they’re a great group.”

There was still a lot of work to do in rural health in terms of bringing it into line with other specialties in medicine so it had the same status and supports, Dr Nixon said.

The full Honours List  includes:

DNZM

To be Dames Companion of the said Order:

The Honourable Ellen Dolour France, of Wellington. For services to the judiciary.

Ms Karen Margaret Sewell, QSO, of Wellington. For services to education.

KNZM

To be Knights Companion of the said Order:

Mr Robert George Mappin Fenwick, CNZM, KStJ, of Auckland. For services to conservation and business.

Mr Michael Friedlander, CNZM, of Auckland. For services to philanthropy.

Mr Christopher Robert Mace, CNZM, of Auckland. For services to science and education.

Mr Matiu Nohorua Te Rei, of Wellington. For services to Māori.

The Honourable Ronald Leslie Young, of Greytown. For services to the judiciary.

CNZM

To be Companions of the said Order:

Professor John Renata Broughton, ED, of Dunedin. For services to Māori health, theatre and the community.

Ms Janice Amelia Dawson, of Auckland. For services to governance.

Mr George Gerald Farrant, of Auckland. For services to heritage preservation.

Ms Myrlene Dawn Jones, OBE, JP, of Auckland. For services to netball and education.

Dr Dianne Christine McCarthy, ONZM, of Blenheim. For services to science, business and women.

Dr Thomas Ernest Miller, of Auckland. For services to medical research.

Ms Jennifer Mary Prince, of Wellington. For services to children and children’s health.

Professor William Te Rangiua Temara, of Hamilton. For services to Māori and education.

Other awards for agribusiness and rural people include:

ONZM

To be Officers of the said Order:

Mr Mark Joseph Greenwood, of Te Puke. For services to biosecurity.

Mr Christopher Morton Kelly, of Wellington. For services to agriculture.

Mr Samuel Kevin Prime, MBE, of Kawakawa. For services to conservation and Māori.

MNZM

To be Members of the said Order:

Dr Maurice Rewi Alley, of Palmerston North. For services to conservation and education.

Mr Gerald Brackenbury, of Lower Hutt. For services to conservation.

Dr Andrew Ian Dennis, of Nelson. For services to conservation.

Mr Andrew Graeme Lowe, of Havelock North. For services to conservation.

Mr Mervyn Douglas Thomas Utting, of Gisborne. For services to sheep dog trials.

QSM

Mr Ruari Ingram Foley, of Waimate. For services to the community.

Mr Gary William Fowler, JP, of Hikuai. For services to the community and agriculture.

Mrs Jennifer Anne Gallagher, JP, of Darfield. For services to the community.

Mr Jacob Cornelis van Dorsser, of Rotorua. For services to the environment.

 


Quote of the day

June 6, 2016

Fearing no insult, asking for no crown, receive with indifference both flattery and slander, and do not argue with a fool. – Alexander Pushkin who was born on this day in 1799.


June 6 in history

June 6, 2016

1508 Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, was defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces.

1513 Italian Wars: Battle of Novara. Swiss troops defeated the French under Louis de la Tremoille, forcing the French to abandon Milan. Duke Massimiliano Sforza was restored.

1523 Gustav Vasa was elected King of Sweden, marking the end of theKalmar Union.

1644 The Qing Dynasty Manchu forces led by the Shunzhi Emperorcaptured Beijing during the collapse of the Ming Dynasty.

1654 Charles X succeeded his abdicated cousin Queen Christina to the Swedish throne.

1674 Shivaji, founder of the Maratha empire was crowned.

1683 The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford opened as the world’s first university museum.

1752 A fire destroyed one-third of Moscow, including 18,000 homes.

1799 Alexander Pushkin, Russian poet, was born (d. 1837).

1808 Napoleon’s brother, Joseph Bonaparte was crowned King of Spain.

1809 Sweden promulgated a new Constitution, which restores political power to the Riksdag of the Estates after 20 years of Enlightened absolutism.

1813 War of 1812: Battle of Stoney Creek – A British force of 700 under John Vincent defeated an American force three times its size under William Winder and John Chandler.

1823 Samuel Leigh and William White established Wesleydale, a Wesleyan (Methodist) mission station at Kaeo, near Whangaroa Harbour.

Wesleyan mission established

1832 The June Rebellion of Paris was put down by the National Guard.

1833 U.S. President Andrew Jackson became the first President to ride a train.

1844 The Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded in London.

1857 Sophia of Nassau married the future King Oscar II of Sweden-Norway.

1859 Queensland was established as a separate colony from New South Wales (Queensland Day).

1862 American Civil War: Battle of Memphis – Union forces captured Memphi, from the Confederates.

1868 Robert Falcon Scott, English explorer was born (d. 1912).

1882 More than 100,000 inhabitants of Bombay were killed when a cyclone in the Arabian Sea pushed huge waves into the harbour.

1882 The Shewan forces of Menelik defeated the Gojjame army in theBattle of Embabo. The Shewans capture Negus Tekle Haymanot of Gojjam, and heir victory leads to a Shewan hegemony over the territories south of the Abay River.

1889 The Great Seattle Fire destroyed downtown Seattle, Washington.

1892 Chicago El began operation.

1894 Governor Davis H. Waite orders the Colorado state militia to protect and support the miners engaged in the Cripple Creek miners’ strike.

1906 Paris Métro Line 5 was inaugurated with a first section from Place d’Italie to the Gare d’Orléans.

1912 The eruption of Novarupta in Alaska began.

1918 World War I: Battle of Belleau Wood – The U.S. Marine Corps suffered its worst single day’s casualties while attempting to recapture the wood at Chateau-Thierry.

1919 The Republic of Prekmurje ended.

1921 The Southwark Bridge in London, was opened for traffic by King George V and Queen Mary.

1923 V. C. Andrews, American author, was born (d. 1986).

1925 The Chrysler Corporation was founded by Walter Percy Chrysler.

1932 The Revenue Act of 1932 was enacted, creating the first gas tax in the United States, at a rate of 1 cent per US gallon (1/4 ¢/L) sold.

1933 The first drive-in theatre opened, in Camden, New Jersey.

1934 King Albert II of Belgium, was born.

1934 New Deal: U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed theSecurities Act of 1933 into law, establishing the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

1936 Levi Stubbs, American musician (The Four Tops), was born (d. 2008).

1939 Adolf Hitler gave a public address to returning German volunteers who fought as Legion Kondor during the Spanish Civil War.

1942 Battle of Midway. U.S. Navy dive bombers sank the Japanese cruiser Mikuma and four Japanese carriers.

1944 Battle of Normandy began. D-Day, code named Operation Overlord, commenced with the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy.

1944 Alaska Airlines commenced operations.

1946 The Basketball Association of America was formed in New York City.

1956 Björn Borg, Swedish tennis player, was born.

1964 Under a temporary order, the rocket launches at Cuxhaven,Germany, were terminated.

1966 James Meredith, civil rights activist, was shot while trying to march across Mississippi.

1968 Senator Robert F. Kennedy died from his wounds after he was shot the previous night.

1971 Soyuz 11 launched.

1971 A midair collision between a Hughes Airwest Douglas DC-9 jetliner and a United States Marine Corps McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II jet fighter near Duarte, California claimed 50 lives.

1971 Vietnam War: The Battle of Long Khanh between Australian and Vietnamese communist forces began.

1974 Sweden became a parliamentary monarchy.

1981 A passenger train travelling between Mansi and Saharsa, India, jumped the tracks at a bridge crossing the Bagmati river.

1982 1982 Lebanon War began. Forces under Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon invaded southern Lebanon in their “Operation Peace for the Galilee“.

1983 – Joe Rokocoko, Fijian rugby player and All Black was born.

Joe Rokocoko.jpg

1984 The Indian Army attacked the Golden Temple in Amritsar following an order from Indira Gandhi.

1985 The grave of “Wolfgang Gerhard” was exhumed in Embu, Brazil; the remains found were later proven to be those of Josef Mengele, Auschwitz’s “Angel of Death”.

1986 – Gin Wigmore, New Zealand singer/songwriter, was born.

1990 U.S. District court judge Jose Gonzales rules that the rap album As Nasty As They Wanna Be by 2 Live Crew violated Florida’s obscenity law; he declared that the predominant subject matter of the record is “directed to the ‘dirty’ thoughts and the loins, not to the intellect and the mind.”

1993 Mongolia held its first direct presidential elections.

1999 In Australian Rules Football, Tony Lockett broke the record for career goals, previously 1299 by Gordon Coventry which had stood since 1937.

2002 A near-Earth asteroid estimated at 10 metres diameter explodedover the Mediterranean Sea between Greece and Libya. The resulting explosion was estimated to have a force of 26 kilotons, slightly more powerful than the Nagasaki atomic bomb.

2004 Tamil was established as a Classical language by the President of India, Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam in a joint sitting of the two houses of the Indian Parliament.

2005 The United States Supreme Court upheld a federal law banning cannabis, including medical marijuana, in Gonzales v. Raich.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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