366 days of gratitude

March 11, 2016

No matter how well I clean my teeth I can never get them to feel as clean as they do after a trip to the dentist.

Today I’m grateful for that freshly cleaned feel.


Word of the day

March 11, 2016

Turophile  – a connoisseur of cheese, cheese fancier, cheese lover.


Rural round-up

March 11, 2016

Speech to MPI Internal Science Conference – Dr William Rolleston:

Ladies and Gentlemen

Thank you for providing me the opportunity to address you today.

In my view you couldn’t have chosen a more important topic as your theme for today.

“Our Science” represents the essence of what you do for the primary industry. Remember you are the Ministry for Primary Industries.

This name was not chosen lightly and it indicates not only where your purpose lies but also the strength that New Zealand has. That strength is biology – we are good at medicine and we are good at agriculture.

Biology depends on science. Our health depends on science, our environment depends on science and our economy depends on science. . . 

Federated Farmers welcomes cut in Official Cash Rate:

Federated Farmers has welcomed the Reserve Bank’s decision to cut the Official Cash Rate by 25 basis points to 2.25 percent.

“It’s now up to the banks to pass this cut on to mortgage holders, and we urge them to do so on behalf of all New Zealand farmers,” Dr Rolleston said. . . 

New requirements for the sale of raw milk to consumers come into force:

New requirements about the sale of raw (unpasteurised) milk to consumers have now come into force.

The requirements follow an extensive consultation and review process and strike a balance between managing the risks to public health while recognising that there is a strong demand for raw milk from both rural and urban consumers, says the Ministry for Primary Industries Deputy-Director Regulation and Assurance, Scott Gallacher.

The new requirements recognise that raw drinking milk is a high risk food, carrying an increased risk of food poisoning relative to pasteurised milk. . . 

New wood products partnership launched:

The formal launch today of the Specialty Wood Products Research Partnership, marks a new chapter for the forestry sector in New Zealand, Associate Primary Industries Minister, Jo Goodhew says.

“I welcome the launch of this new partnership, and the ground-breaking research that will be undertaken. Forestry is a key export earner for New Zealand that is worth around $5 billion annually, and employs nearly 20,000 people” Mrs Goodhew says.

The research project, entitled “New Regional Value Chains for Specialty Wood Products Matching Species, Site, Processing, Product and Market”, is part of a seven year partnership between central government and industry. It aims to investigate the development of new wood products from specialty species. . .

Wool Stays Steady:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s C.E.O, Mr John Dawson reports that the South Island offering of 7,800 bales saw good competition with 88 percent selling.

The weighted currency indicator came down 0.98 percent compared to the last sale on 3rd March, however the US dollar was practically unchanged with the NZ Dollar softening against the Euro, Stirling and Australian currencies.

Mr Dawson advises that Fine Crossbred Fleece and Shears were generally firm to slightly dearer. . . 


Friday’s answers

March 11, 2016

Andrei, Teletext and J Bloggs posed the questions for which they get my thanks.

Should they have stumped us all they can claim a dozen punnets of kiwi berries by leaving the answers below.


Quote of the day

March 11, 2016

To give real service you must add something which cannot be bought or measured with money, and that is sincerity and integrity. Douglas Adams who was born on this day in 1952.

He also said:

I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by.

And:

Wandering around the web is like living in a world in which every doorway is actually one of those science fiction devices which deposit you in a completely different part of the world when you walk through them. In fact, it isn’t like it, it is it.

And:

The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at and repair. 

And:

Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.


March 11 in history

March 11, 2016

1387 Battle of Castagnaro: English condottiero Sir John Hawkwood led Padova to victory in a factional clash with Verona.

1649 The Frondeurs and the French government signed the Peace of Rueil.

1702 The Daily Courant, the UK’s first national daily newspaper was published for the first time.

1708 Queen Anne withheld Royal Assent from the Scottish Militia Bill, the last time a British monarch vetoed legislation.

1824 The United States War Department created the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

1845 Hone Heke cut down the British flag pole for the fourth time. He and Kawiti were leading figures in the attack which resulted in the  fall of Kororareka.

The fall of Kororareka

1848 Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine and Robert Baldwin became the first Prime Ministers of the Province of Canada to be democratically elected under a system of responsible government.

1851 The first performance of Rigoletto, written by Verdi.

1864 The Great Sheffield Flood: The largest man-made disaster ever to befall England killed more than 250 people.

1867  The first performance of Don Carlo written by Verdi.

1872 – Kathleen Clarice Groom, Australian-English author and screenwriter, was born (d. 1954).

1872 Construction of the Seven Sisters Colliery, South Wales, started; located on one of the richest coal sources in Britain.

1888 The Great Blizzard of 1888 began along the eastern seaboard of the United States, shutting down commerce and killing more than 400.

1903 Ronald Syme, New Zealand classicist and historian, was born (d. 1989).

1915 J. C. R. Licklider, American computer scientist and Internet pioneer, was born (d. 1990).

1916 Harold Wilson, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born. (d. 1995)

1916  Ezra Jack Keats, children’s  author, was born (d. 1983).

1917   Baghdad fell to the Anglo-Indian forces commanded by GeneralStanley Maude.

1927 Samuel Roxy Rothafel opened the Roxy Theatre in New York.

1931 Rupert Murdoch, Australian-born entrepreneur, was born.

1941  President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Lend-Lease Act into law, allowing American-built war supplies to be shipped to the Allies on loan.

1945 The Imperial Japanese Navy attempted a large-scale kamikaze attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet anchored at Ulithi atoll in Operation Tan No. 2.

1952 Douglas Adams, English writer, was born (d. 2001).

1958 Ghazi Mashal Ajil al-Yawer, interim President of Iraq, was born.

1977 The 1977 Hanafi Muslim Siege: more than 130 hostages held in Washington, D.C., by Hanafi Muslims are set free after ambassadors from three Islamic nations join negotiations.

1978 Coastal Road massacre: At least 37 were killed and more than 70 are wounded when Al Fatah hijack an Israeli bus, prompting Israel’s Operation Litani.

1985 Mikhail Gorbachev became the Soviet Union’s leader.

1990 Lithuania declared itself independent from the Soviet Union.

1990 Patricio Aylwin was sworn-in as the first democratically elected Chilean president since 1970.

1993 Janet Reno was confirmed by the United States Senate and sworn-in the next day, becoming the first female Attorney General of the United States.

1999 – Infosys becomes the first Indian company listed on the NASDAQ stock exchange.

2004  Simultaneous explosions on rush hour trains in Madrid  killed 191 people.

2006 Michelle Bachelet was inaugurated as first female president of Chile.

2009 Winnenden school shooting – 17 people were killed at a school in Germany.

2011 – An earthquake measuring 9.0 in magnitude strikes 130 km (81 mi) east of Sendai, Japan, triggering a tsunami killing thousands of people. This event also triggered the second largest nuclear accident in history, and one of only two events to be classified as a Level 7 on the International Nuclear Event Scale.

2012 – A US soldier killed 16 civilians in the Panjwayi District of Afghanistan near Kandahar.

2014 – Russia annexed Autonomous Republic of Crimea. Leading to the 2014 Crimean crisis and 2014–15 Russian military intervention in Ukraine.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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