366 days of gratitude

March 9, 2016

The home in which I grew up had one telephone.

It was attached to the wall in what we called the sun room.

As its name suggests it was warm on a good day but in inclement weather or at night it was cold.

If you didn’t need privacy or quiet you could stretch the cord far enough to converse in the kitchen which was always warm. But if you wanted to hear properly or keep your conversation to yourself you had to stay put regardless of the temperature.

How much easier it is now when most phones are cordless and many are mobile.

Today I’m grateful for portable and mobile communication.

 

 


Word of the day

March 9, 2016

Laudation – containing or expressing praise; commendation;  eulogy.


How long will milk be low?

March 9, 2016

Fonterra’s announcement of another cut in the forecast milk payout was disappointing but not unexpected.

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited today reduced its forecast Farmgate Milk Price for the 2015/16 season from $4.15 per kgMS to $3.90 per kgMS.

When combined with the forecast earnings per share range of 45-55 cents, this means a total forecast available for payout of $4.35-$4.45 per kgMS and would currently equate to a forecast Cash Payout of $4.25-$4.30 per kgMS for a fully shared-up farmer after retentions. 

This is well below break even for almost all dairy farms and farmers have responded to price signals by cutting costs which in turn has reduced production.

Fonterra is forecasting its New Zealand milk production to be at least 4 per cent lower than last season as New Zealand farmers respond to the ongoing low prices by reducing herd size and feeding significantly less supplementary feed which is expected to have an impact on this Autumn’s production. . . 

One reason the milk price is so low is that farmers in other countries still get subsidies so haven’t had the price signal to cut production.

Chief Executive Theo Spierings said dairy exports and imports had been imbalanced for the past 18 months due to European production increasing more than expected, and lower imports into China and Russia – the two largest importers of dairy.

“The time frame for a rebalancing has moved out and largely depends on production reducing – particularly in Europe – in response to these unsustainably low global dairy prices.

But how long will prices stay low?

“The long-term fundamentals for dairy are positive with demand increasing at over 2 per cent a year due to the growing world population, increasing middle classes in Asia, urbanisation and favourable demographics.  

“Our forecast is based on no significant changes to either supply or demand globally before the end of the year. However, a reduction in the supply available for export before then could mean prices recover earlier than currently expected,” said Mr Spierings.

It isn’t just farmers but sharemilkers, their staff and everyone who services or supplies them who will be affected.

Bad as it is though, this is not like the ag-sag of the 1980s when all farming was in the doldrums while inflation was raging and interest rates soared. At one stage we were paying around 26% on seasonal finance.

 


Quote of the day

March 9, 2016

It is necessary to write, if the days are not to slip emptily by. How else, indeed, to clap the net over the butterfly of the moment? For the moment passes, it is forgotten; the mood is gone; life itself is gone. That is where the writer scores over his fellows: he catches the changes of his mind on the hop. –  Vita Sackville-West who was born on this day in 1892.


March 9 in history

March 9, 2016

141 BC Liu Che, posthumously known as Emperor Wu of Han, assumed the throne over the Han Dynasty of China.

1230 AD – Bulgarian tsar Ivan Asen II defeated Theodore of Epirus in theBattle of Klokotnitsa.

1276  Augsburg became an Imperial Free City.

1500 The fleet of Pedro Alvares Cabral left Lisbon for the Indies.

1566 David Rizzio, the private secretary to Mary, Queen of Scots was murdered.

1765 After a campaign by the writer Voltaire, judges in Paris posthumously exonerated Jean Calas of murdering his son. Calas had been tortured and executed in 1762 on the charge, though his son may have actually committed suicide.

1796 Napoléon Bonaparte married his first wife, Joséphine de Beauharnais.

1841 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that captive Africans who had seized control of the ship carrying them had been taken into slavery illegally.

1842 Giuseppe Verdi‘s third opera Nabucco receives its première performance in Milan.

1847 Mexican-American War: The first large-scale amphibious assault in U.S. history was launched in the Siege of Veracruz

1862  The USS Monitor and CSS Virginia fought to a draw in the Battle of Hampton Roads, the first fight between two ironclad warships.

1890 – Surveyor William Quill used only basic climbing equipment, including a billhook and an alpenstock, to scale the side of the Sutherland Falls  which cascades for 580 m near Milford Sound.

1892 Vita Sackville-West, English writer and gardener, was born  (d. 1962).

1896 Prime Minister Francesco Crispi resigned following the Italian defeat at the Battle of Adowa.

1910  Westmoreland County Coal Strike, involving 15,000 coal miners began.

1916 Pancho Villa led nearly 500 Mexican raiders in an attack against Columbus, New Mexico.

1918 Mickey Spillane, American writer, was born (d. 2006).

1925  Pink’s War: The first Royal Air Force operation conducted independently of the British Army or Royal Navy began.

1933 President Franklin D. Roosevelt submitted the Emergency Banking Act to the Congress, the first of his New Deal policies.

1934 Yuri Gagarin, Soviet cosmonaut and the first human in space, was born (d. 1968).

1947 Keri Hulme, New Zealand writer, was born.

BonePeople.JPG

1954 Bobby Sands, IRA member, was born (d. 1981).

1956 Soviet military suppressesed mass demonstrations in the Georgian SSR, reacting to Khrushchev’s de-Stalinization policy.

1956, Opononi George or Opo, also known as the ‘gay dolphin’, died.

Death of Opo the friendly dolphin

1957 A magnitude 8.3 earthquake in the Andreanof Islands, Alaska triggered a Pacific-wide tsunami causing extensive damage to Hawaii and Oahu.

1959 The Barbie doll made its debut at the American International Toy Fair in New York.

1963 David Pogue, Technology columnist and musician, was born.

1967 Trans World Airlines Flight 553, a Douglas DC-9-15, crashed in a field in Concord Township, Ohio following a mid-air collision with a Beechcraft Baron, killing 26.

1976 – Forty-two people died in the 1976 Cavalese cable-car disaster, the worst cable-car accident to date.

1977 The Hanafi Muslim Siege: In a thirty-nine hour standoff, armed Hanafi Muslims seized three Washington, D.C., buildings, killing two and taking 149 hostage.

1989 A strike forced financially-troubled Eastern Air Lines into bankruptcy.

1990 Dr. Antonia Novello was sworn in as Surgeon General of the United States, becoming the first female and Hispanic American to serve in that position.

1991 Massive demonstrations were held against Slobodan Milošević in Belgrade. Two people were killed.

1997  Observers in China, Mongolia and eastern Siberia were treated to a rare double feature as an eclipse permitted Comet Hale-Bopp to be seen during the day.

2010 – The first same-sex marriages in Washington, D.C., took place.

2011 – Space Shuttle Discovery made its final landing after 39 flights.

2012 – Polish mountaineers Adam Bielecki and Janusz Gołąb made the first winter ascent of Gasherbrum I.

2015  – Two helicopters collided near Villa Castelli, Argentina killing 10 people.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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