366 days of gratitude

February 17, 2016

When we set out on a journey we probably don’t think about not returning yet the road toll is a sad tally of people whose journeys ended in death.

I’ve just arrived home an hour later than anticipated because the plane from Wellington to Christchurch was delayed.

That wasn’t all bad as the later start to my 3 1/2 drive south meant the road was quieter than it would have been earlier and the trip down was uneventful.

I am late, but I’m home and grateful for that, and for journeys that end safely.


Word of the day

February 17, 2016

Sementine – pertaining to sowing or seeding fields.


Rural round-up

February 17, 2016

Urban ideals quash rural spirit – Craig Wiggins:

Over the last few years I have stood in front of many, commentating rural sports in many rural communities in three different countries and feel it’s time to put some perspective into the emotive protests for and against rural activities.  

We have just witnessed the SAFE campaign against the dairy industry and through the summer the anti-rodeo campaign gaining media coverage.  As in the case of the SAFE coverage, it’s easy fodder for urban-based journalists to get consumer buy-in and notoriety for their own careers.  

I pat on the back anyone who is passionate about what they believe in or against and stand up for it.

I am, however, against sensationalising facts and issues in the pursuit of self-promotion and a win over others at all costs, whether it be the truth or not.  

To win an argument one should be more knowledgeable about the facts the opposing side is arguing than they are. . . 

Landcorp scraps Shanghai Pengxin deal – Neal Wallace:

Landcorp will not renew its sharemilking contract with Chinese corporate dairy farmers Shanghai Pengxin when it expires at the end of next season.  

This brings to an end an arrangement that started in November 2012 when Shanghai Pengxin bought 16 Central North Island dairy farms that belonged to the Crafar family. . . 

Alliance enforces shareholding commitment to match supply – Allan Barber:

After many years competing for livestock without compelling suppliers to invest in the full number of shares required in principle, Alliance Group has seized the opportunity offered by Silver Fern Farms’ likely shareholding change to review its capital base.

The uncharitable observer would presume this action is necessary to raise more capital for balance sheet or investment purposes. However Alliance chairman Murray Taggart is adamant this move is all about correcting the imbalance between those suppliers who are fully shared up and those who have made a lesser commitment. The adjustment will take place gradually in line with the rate of supply with deductions of 50 cents per lamb, sheep or calf, $2 per deer and $6 per head of cattle. . . 

Has our dairy industry gone too far? – Julian Lee:

We all know the importance of our dairy industry and its existence to our country.

It’s our number one industry — we get that.

But has dairy gone too far in the beautiful Mackenzie Country?

The Mackenzie Basin is a stunning piece of landscape in the South Island — a desert spotted with electric blue lakes surrounded by mountains.

It is the last place you would think you would want to put cows. . . 

Open Country Dairy posts record annual profit in 2015 – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – Open Country Dairy, the dairy manufacturer controlled by Talley’s Group, posted a record annual profit last year even as revenue fell.

Profit increased 16 percent to $34.4 million in the year ended Sept. 30, 2015, according to the Auckland-based company’s annual report. Revenue slid 24 percent to $688 million while the cost of sales sank 28 percent to $620.5 million, according to the accounts.

The company didn’t pay a dividend and has previously said it was investing in infrastructure for future growth. . . 

Weaknesses in industry cohesion and international marketing are costing kiwi farmers:

Federated Farmers Meat and Fibre Chair Rick Powdrell is calling for action to be taken to address issues in the marketing of kiwi lamb overseas – particularly in the UK – to prevent our sheep farmers continuing to face low returns.

Speaking at Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre Council in Wellington today, Mr Powdrell said meals featuring lamb had fallen 7% in the UK, while lamb consumption in the US was rising at 10% per year.

Mr Powdrell has just returned from the American Sheep Industry Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, where he had seen first-hand some of the initiatives that are underpinning this growth. . . 


GDT down 2.8%

February 17, 2016

It’s a sign of how worried we were that a drop of 2.8% in this morning’s GlobalDairyTrade auction has been greeted with relief.

gldt16216

gDT.16216

 


Quote of the day

February 17, 2016

While most of the things you’ve worried about have never happened, it’s a different story with the things you haven’t worried about. They are the ones that happen. – Ruth Rendell who was born on this day in 1930.


February 17 in history

February 17, 2016

1500 The Battle of Hemmingstedt.

1600 The philosopher Giordano Bruno was burned alive at Campo de’ Fiori in Rome for heresy.

1801 An electoral tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr was resolved when Jefferson was elected President of the United States and Burr Vice President by the United States House of Representatives.

1809 Miami University was chartered by the State of Ohio.

1814 The Battle of Mormans.

1819 The United States House of Representatives passed the Missouri Compromise.

1848 Louisa Lawson, Australian suffragist and writer, was born  (d. 1920).

1854 The United Kingdom recognised the independence of the Orange Free State.

1864  Banjo Paterson, Australian poet, was born  (d. 1941).

1864 The H. L. Hunley became the first submarine to engage and sink a warship, the USS Housatonic.

1867 The first ship passed through the Suez Canal.

1873 – Emily Hancock Siedeberg-McKinnon, CBE MB ChB BSc, first woman to graduate from the University of Otago Medical School, was born (d. 1968).

Emily Hancock Siedeberg

 

1873 The editor of the Daily Southern Cross, David Luckie, published a hoax report of a Russian invasion of Auckland by the cruiser Kaskowiski(cask of whisky).

'The Russians are coming!'

1877  Isabelle Eberhardt, Swiss explorer and writer, was born  (d. 1904).

1904 Madama Butterfly by Giacomo Puccini received its premiere at La Scala in Milan.

1913 The Armory Show opened in New York City, displaying works of artists who are to become some of the most influential painters of the early 20th century.

1917 Guillermo González Camarena, Mexican inventor (colour television), was born  (d. 1965).

1924  Johnny Weissmuller set a new world record in the 100-yard freestyle swimming competition with a time of 52-2/5 seconds.

1924 Margaret Truman, American novelist, was born (d. 2008).

1925 Harold Ross and Jane Grant founded The New Yorker magazine.

1925 Ron Goodwin, English composer and conductor, was born  (d. 2003).

1929 Patricia Routledge, English actress, was born.

1930 Ruth Rendell, English writer, was born, (d. 2015).

1933 Newsweek magazine was published for the first time.

1933 – The Blaine Act ended Prohibition in the United States.

1934 Barry Humphries, Australian actor and comedian, was born.

1940  Gene Pitney, American singer, was born (d. 2006).

1945 Brenda Fricker, Irish actress, was born.

1947 The Voice of America began to transmit radio broadcasts to the Soviet Union.

1958 Pope Pius XII declared Saint Clare of Assisi (1193~1253) the patron saint of television.

1959 Vanguard 2 – The first weather satellite was launched to measure cloud-cover distribution.

1962 A storm killed more than 300 people in Hamburg.

1963 Michael Jordan, American basketball player, was born.

1964 Gabonese president Leon M’ba was toppled by a coup and his archrival, Jean-Hilaire Aubame, was installed in his place.

1965  The Ranger 8 probe launched on its mission to photograph the Mare Tranquillitatis region of the Moon in preparation for the manned Apollo missions.

1972 Sales of the Volkswagen Beetle model exceeded those of Ford Model-T.

1978 A Provisional IRA incendiary bomb was detonated at the La Mon restaurant, near Belfast, killing 12 and seriously injuring 30.

1979 The Sino-Vietnamese War started.

1995 – The Cenepa War between Peru and Ecuador ends on a cease-fire brokered by the UN.

1996 World champion Garry Kasparov beat the Deep Blue supercomputer in a chess match.

1996 – NASA’s Discovery Programme started as the NEAR Shoemakerspacecraft lifted off on the first mission ever to orbit and land upon an asteroid, 433 Eros.

2003 The London Congestion Charge scheme began.

2006 A massive mudslide occurred in Southern Leyte, Philippines; the official death toll was 1,126.

2008 Kosovo declared independence.

2011 – Libyan protests began. In Bahrain, security forces launched a deadly Pre-dawn raid on protesters in Pearl Roundabout in Manama, on what is known as Bloody Thursday.

2015 – 18 people were killed and 78 injured in a stampede at a Mardi Gras parade in Haiti.

Sourced from NZ History Online, Te Ara Encyclopedia of NZ and Wikipedia


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