Quote of the day

[A] quotation is a handy thing to have about, saving one the trouble of thinking for oneself, always a laborious business. – A.A. Milne who was born on this day in 1882.

He also said:

The third-rate mind is only happy when it is thinking with the majority. The second-rate mind is only happy when it is thinking with the minority. The first-rate mind is only happy when it is thinking.

And:

My spelling is Wobbly. It’s good spelling but it Wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places.

(one of my favourites because my spelling has a tendency to wobble too).

And :

Pay attention to where you are going because without meaning you might get nowhere.

And:

. . . Poetry and Hums aren’t things which you get, they’re things which get you. And all you can do is to go where they can find you.

And:

Organization is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it’s not all mixed up.

And:

A little Consideration, a little Thought for Others, makes all the difference.

And:

We can’t all, and some of us don’t.

And:

When you do the things that you can do, you will find a way.

And:

No doubt Jack the Ripper excused himself on the grounds that it was human nature.

And:

Good judgment comes from experience, and experience – well, that comes from poor judgment.

And:

Almost anyone can be an author; the business is to collect money and fame from this state of being.

And:

If a statement is untrue, it is not the more respectable because it has been said in Latin.

And:

It is a terrible thing for an author to have a lot of people running about his book without any invitation from him at all.

And:

The truth is that Fate does not go out of its way to be dramatic. If you or I had the power of life and death in our hands, we should no doubt arrange some remarkably bright and telling effects. A man who spilt the salt callously would be drowned next week in the Dead Sea, and a couple who married in May would expire simultaneously in the May following. But Fate cannot worry to think out all the clever things that we should think out. It goes about its business solidly and unromantically, and by the ordinary laws of chance it achieves every now and then something startling and romantic. Superstition thrives on the fact that only the accidental dramas are reported.

And:

The things that make me different are the things that make me ME.

And:

In the language of the day it is customary to describe a certain sort of book as “escapist” literature. As I understand it, the adjective implies, a little condescendingly, that the life therein depicted cannot be identified with the real life which the critic knows so well in W.C.1: and may even have the disastrous effect on the reader of taking him happily for a few hours out of his own real life in N.W.8. Why this should be a matter for regret I do not know; nor why realism in a novel is so much admired when realism in a picture is condemned as mere photography; nor, I might add, why drink and fornication should seem to bring the realist closer to real life than, say, golf and gardening.

And:

The Old Testament is responsible for more atheism, agnosticism, disbelief—call it what you will—than any book ever written; it has emptied more churches than all the counterattractions of cinema, motor bicycle and golf course.

And:

One advantage of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.

And:

The other day I met a man who didn’t know where Tripoli was. Tripoli happened to come into the conversation, and he was evidently at a loss. “Let’s see,” he said. “Tripoli is just down by the – er – you know. What’s the name of that place?” “That’s right,” I answered, “just opposite, Thingumabob. I could show you in a minute on a map. It’s near – what do they call it?” At this moment the train stopped, and I got out and went straight home to look at my atlas.

And:

Weeds are Flowers too, once you get to know them.

And:

“Pooh, how do you spell love?’ ‘You don’t spell love Piglet, you feel it”

And:

One of the difficulties of thinking clearly about anything is that it is almost impossible not to form our ideas in words which have some previous association for us; with the result that our thought is already shaped along certain lines before we have begun to follow it out. Again, a word may have various meanings, and our use of it in one sense may deceive our readers (or even ourselves) into supposing that we were using it in some other sense.

And:

If one is to be called a liar, one may as well make an effort to deserve the name.

And:

No sensible author wants anything but praise.

And

Bores can be divided into two classes; those who have their own particular subject, and those who do not need a subject.

And:

I suppose that every one of us hopes secretly for immortality; to leave, I mean, a name behind him which will live forever in this world, whatever he may be doing, himself, in the next. . . 

2 Responses to Quote of the day

  1. pdm says:

    Our family are all AA Milne fans.

    Like

  2. fredinthegrass says:

    Ours too, pdm. Although the “grandies” less so.
    My favorite is Pooh. Without sounding too ‘grand’, I think I am a little like Pooh!

    Like

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