Rural round-up

Groser disappointed TPP deal not reached:

Trade Minister Tim Groser is disappointed that the TPP negotiations were unable to reach a conclusion today, but TPP ministers collectively pledged to meet again as soon as possible to finalise the deal.

“Good progress was made this week, but a number of challenging issues remain, including intellectual property and market access for dairy products”, Mr Groser said.

“We will continue to work toward a successful conclusion. This is about getting the best possible deal for New Zealand, not a deal at any cost.” . . .

TPP pressure on Canada, but US is super-star in agriculture subsidies – Lawrence Herman:

Americans provide billions in protectionism to dairy that will have to be given up for trade deal.

We rail against Canada’s supply management system. Rightly so. It’s a Soviet-style regime that is out of step with Canada’s international trade interests and objectives. Every credible Canadian think-tank has said that supply management is a regressive system that distorts the market by guaranteeing dairy, poultry and egg producers a positive return on production, inhibiting competitiveness and, in the long-run, preventing Canada from becoming an exporting agriculture powerhouse. . .

 Groser proves trade credentials by insisting on a good deal:

The Dairy Companies Association of New Zealand (DCANZ) is commending New Zealand Trade Minister, Tim Groser, for standing firm against enormous pressure to concede to a sub-standard deal for dairy. The Minister and his team of expert negotiators have preserved the ability to conclude a good deal in the future.

“What was on the table fell well short of the deal required to deliver the commercially meaningful access that is needed by New Zealand’s dairy industry” says DCANZ Chairman Malcolm Bailey, who has been in Maui, Hawaii, where the negotiations took place over the past week.

Agreeing a bad deal would have consigned New Zealand farmers to many more years under the burden of heavy protectionism. Trade prohibitive tariff levels in Japan, Canada and the United States contribute to a thin global dairy market and exacerbate extreme price volatility. . .

 Concerns over strong El Niño:

NIWA fears this year’s El Nino may be as bad as 18 years ago, when widespread drought cost the country a billion dollars in lost exports.

International guidelines indicated a 97 percent chance of El Niño continuing over the next three months and a 90 per cent chance it will continue over summer.

El Niño typically sees the west of New Zealand wet, and the east very dry.

Niwa forecaster Chris Brandolino said it was looking like it could be as significant as the El Nino in the nineties. . .

Where every day is a good day – Kate Taylor:

Discussion groups, monitor farm programmes, running a Gisborne hill country station and his house burning down couldn’t prepare farmer Ken Shaw for being given a 15 per cent chance of surviving the cancer attacking his body. But survive he did.

“Every day’s a good day,” he says, driving his bike in driving, freezing cold rain on his Matawai farm the day before a big snow storm hits the region and dumps a metre of snow on tops of his hills.

Ken and Kirsty Shaw farm the 709ha hectare Elmore Station (680ha effective) on Rakauroa Road at Matawai near the highest point of the highway between Gisborne and Opotiki. . .

Cut unprofitable production – DairyNZ CEO:

With the continued decline in milk price, DairyNZ chief executive Tim Mackle is calling on farmers to cut unprofitable production from their systems.

“These are extraordinary times. Open Country Dairy’s milk price forecast is under $4 per kilogram of milksolids (kg MS) and all indicators show Fonterra will be forced to lower their forecast on August 7. This price dip is lower and longer than anything we’ve seen in the last decade,” says Tim.

“Assuming a milk price of $4.00 for the average Open Country Dairy supplier, that means a potential deficit of around $250,000 for the year ahead.” . . .

Rural Women as relevant today:

In 90 years, Rural Women New Zealand has grown to a 2700-strong organisation but many of the issues it works on have remained the same.

In July 1925, Florence Polson became the first head of the women’s division of the forerunner of Federated Farmers.

Women’s Division Farmers Union was driven by concerns about health and the effects of isolation for women living on farms. . .

 

6 Responses to Rural round-up

  1. Mr Peters raises a fair point…

    “It is rich of Mr Key to trumpet ‘free trade deals offer real benefits with jobs and economic growth in New Zealand,’ when he is blocking an opportunity for our struggling New Zealand dairy exporters,” says Mr Peters.

    “The United States Department of Agriculture ranks Russia as the second largest dairy importing nation in the world, trailing only China.

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PA1507/S00362/key-wrongly-slams-the-door-shut-on-dairy-exports-to-russia.htm

    How come Mr Key is happy to do deals and bend over backwards for the Saudi’s and the sell the farm to the Chinese-commies but when it comes to Russia – Oh no can’t do that – human rights and all

    Like

  2. JC says:

    And you believe Winston?

    NZ does *not* have a ban on exporting dairy product to Russia and Russia does not (sort of) have a ban on NZ product but is refusing to recertify 75% of NZ dairy factories that supply it because of the botulism scare of 2013.

    Key has said ” Prime Minister John Key said he had received advice New Zealand wasn’t on Russia’s banned list.

    “But whether that ultimately means we do sell more we’ll have to work through the fine print of that,” he said.

    “I’d hate to think that New Zealand was doing something other countries weren’t, but you’ve got to remember this is being driven by the Russians and not driven by us.”

    Key said refusing to sell products to sell products to a country out of protest, was not a stance the Government had ever taken.

    “We can have a look at that, and we can take some advice on that, but at this stage I suspect we would sell if demand was there.”

    New Zealand law did not allow for unilateral sanctions to be applied to Russia.

    “And these are private sector companies so we couldn’t actually stop them from selling [their products] there if they want to.”

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/agribusiness/10363174/Russia-wants-our-cheese-but-at-what-cost

    However trade export experts have warned companies like Fonterra that a short term gain of exporting to Russia might create long term pain from all the other countries we export to if we are seen to be taking advantage of Russian bans on many of our other trading partners like Australia, US, the European Union and others.

    JC

    Like

  3. Fine then sell the farms to the Chinese-commies

    Like

  4. I did have one other earner for you cow-cockies and sheep-shaggers, bit of a cash crop…

    https://r1016132.wordpress.com/2015/07/31/there-aint-no-rest-for-the-wicked-money-does-grow-on-trees-i-got-bills-to-pay-i-got-mouths-to-feed-and-aint-nothing-in-this-world-for-free/

    I know the gummit says it’s a crime to make money but hey tough times and all

    Like

  5. Name Withheld says:

    Stay classy, numbers, stay classy.

    Like

  6. Was just a bit of banter ‘Name Witheld’ didn’t realise you farmers were so precious – no offence intended

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: