Word of the day

August 2, 2015

Apoplexed – affected with apoplexy; paralysed; benumbed.


Rural round-up

August 2, 2015

Groser disappointed TPP deal not reached:

Trade Minister Tim Groser is disappointed that the TPP negotiations were unable to reach a conclusion today, but TPP ministers collectively pledged to meet again as soon as possible to finalise the deal.

“Good progress was made this week, but a number of challenging issues remain, including intellectual property and market access for dairy products”, Mr Groser said.

“We will continue to work toward a successful conclusion. This is about getting the best possible deal for New Zealand, not a deal at any cost.” . . .

TPP pressure on Canada, but US is super-star in agriculture subsidies – Lawrence Herman:

Americans provide billions in protectionism to dairy that will have to be given up for trade deal.

We rail against Canada’s supply management system. Rightly so. It’s a Soviet-style regime that is out of step with Canada’s international trade interests and objectives. Every credible Canadian think-tank has said that supply management is a regressive system that distorts the market by guaranteeing dairy, poultry and egg producers a positive return on production, inhibiting competitiveness and, in the long-run, preventing Canada from becoming an exporting agriculture powerhouse. . .

 Groser proves trade credentials by insisting on a good deal:

The Dairy Companies Association of New Zealand (DCANZ) is commending New Zealand Trade Minister, Tim Groser, for standing firm against enormous pressure to concede to a sub-standard deal for dairy. The Minister and his team of expert negotiators have preserved the ability to conclude a good deal in the future.

“What was on the table fell well short of the deal required to deliver the commercially meaningful access that is needed by New Zealand’s dairy industry” says DCANZ Chairman Malcolm Bailey, who has been in Maui, Hawaii, where the negotiations took place over the past week.

Agreeing a bad deal would have consigned New Zealand farmers to many more years under the burden of heavy protectionism. Trade prohibitive tariff levels in Japan, Canada and the United States contribute to a thin global dairy market and exacerbate extreme price volatility. . .

 Concerns over strong El Niño:

NIWA fears this year’s El Nino may be as bad as 18 years ago, when widespread drought cost the country a billion dollars in lost exports.

International guidelines indicated a 97 percent chance of El Niño continuing over the next three months and a 90 per cent chance it will continue over summer.

El Niño typically sees the west of New Zealand wet, and the east very dry.

Niwa forecaster Chris Brandolino said it was looking like it could be as significant as the El Nino in the nineties. . .

Where every day is a good day – Kate Taylor:

Discussion groups, monitor farm programmes, running a Gisborne hill country station and his house burning down couldn’t prepare farmer Ken Shaw for being given a 15 per cent chance of surviving the cancer attacking his body. But survive he did.

“Every day’s a good day,” he says, driving his bike in driving, freezing cold rain on his Matawai farm the day before a big snow storm hits the region and dumps a metre of snow on tops of his hills.

Ken and Kirsty Shaw farm the 709ha hectare Elmore Station (680ha effective) on Rakauroa Road at Matawai near the highest point of the highway between Gisborne and Opotiki. . .

Cut unprofitable production – DairyNZ CEO:

With the continued decline in milk price, DairyNZ chief executive Tim Mackle is calling on farmers to cut unprofitable production from their systems.

“These are extraordinary times. Open Country Dairy’s milk price forecast is under $4 per kilogram of milksolids (kg MS) and all indicators show Fonterra will be forced to lower their forecast on August 7. This price dip is lower and longer than anything we’ve seen in the last decade,” says Tim.

“Assuming a milk price of $4.00 for the average Open Country Dairy supplier, that means a potential deficit of around $250,000 for the year ahead.” . . .

Rural Women as relevant today:

In 90 years, Rural Women New Zealand has grown to a 2700-strong organisation but many of the issues it works on have remained the same.

In July 1925, Florence Polson became the first head of the women’s division of the forerunner of Federated Farmers.

Women’s Division Farmers Union was driven by concerns about health and the effects of isolation for women living on farms. . .

 


Second Thoughts

August 2, 2015

second thoughts StoryPeople print by Brian Andreas

Travelling as fast in one direction as she can go before she has second thoughts & goes back to doing the same old stuff.

Second Thoughts ©2015 Brian Andreas – posted with permission.

You can sign up for a daily email delivery of a dose of whimsy like this at Story People.

 


Why bother with voters?

August 2, 2015

This headline should cause disquiet in anyone who cares for democracy: Peters: NZ First will decide 2017 election.

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters says he will be more powerful than ever by the next election and will decide the next government. . . .

Why bother with voters?

If he won’t give us the courtesy of explaining his intentions before the election and does what he’s done in the past, leaving us voting blind, why bother with an election?

He wants to be king maker but he’ still not willing or able to give a straight answer to a straight question.

. . .  You said you’d resign if you don’t get tens of thousands of new members? “Yeah, precisely. There’d be no sense going on.” That’s a commitment from you. Tens of thousands or you’re gone? “Yes”. Could we narrow that down – more than 10,000 or you’ll resign? “No, I said if we don’t increase our membership… Why don’t you ask a straight question?” But we did… “Well maybe I didn’t hear properly…stop your humbug.”

This old leopard won’t change his spots and he’s dreaming if he thinks he can increase his membership to that extent.

As a member of National, the only party in New Zealand which has tens of thousands of members, I know what it takes to attract and retain members.

If Labour with nation-wide electorate structures and unions helping can’t do it, Peters and his party which never stands in more than a handful of seats won’t have a chance.


Sunday soapbox

August 2, 2015

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse, but not abuse.
Spirit Science's photo.

Sometimes when you’re in a dark place you think you’ve been buried, but actually you’ve been planted. – Christine Caine

 


August 2 in history

August 2, 2015

338 BC  A Macedonian army led by Philip II defeated the combined forces of Athens and Thebes in the Battle of Chaeronea, securing Macedonian hegemony in Greece and the Aegean.

216 BC Second Punic War: Battle of Cannae – The Carthaginian army lead by Hannibal defeated a numerically superior Roman army under command of consuls Lucius Aemilius Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro.

1377 – Russian troops were defeated in the Battle on Pyana River, while drunk.

1610  Henry Hudson sailed into what it is now known as Hudson Bay, thinking he had made it through the Northwest Passage and reached the Pacific Ocean.

1798 – French Revolutionary Wars: Battle of the Nile (Battle of Aboukir Bay) concluded with a British victory.

1835 –  Elisha Gray, American inventor and entrepreneur, was born (d. 1901).

1869 Japan’s samurai, farmer, artisan, merchant class system (Shinōkōshō) was abolished as part of the Meiji Restoration reforms.

1870  Tower Subway, the world’s first underground tube railway, opened in London.

1895 – Matt Henderson, New Zealand cricketer was born (d. 1970).

1903  Fall of the Ottoman Empire: Unsuccessful uprising led by the Internal Macedonian-Adrianople Revolutionary Organization against Ottoman,TUrkey, also known as the Ilinden-Preobrazhenie Uprising.

1916  World War I: Austrian sabotage caused the sinking of the Italian battleship Leonardo da Vinci in Taranto.

1923  Shimon Peres, Israeli politician, Prime Minister of Israel and the ninth President of Israel, was born.

1924  James Baldwin, American author, was born (d. 1987).

1924  Carroll O’Connor,  American actor, was born (d. 2001).

1925  Alan Whicker, British journalist and broadcaster, was born.

1932 Peter O’Toole, Irish-born actor, was born.

1932 – The positron (antiparticle of the electron) was discovered by Carl D. Anderson.

1934 Gleichschaltung: Adolf Hitler became Führer of Germany.

1937 The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 was passed in America, essentially rendering marijuana and all its by-products illegal.

1939 Albert Einstein and Leó Szilárd wrote a letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt, urging him to begin the Manhattan project to develop a nuclear weapon.

1942 Isabel Allende, Chilean author, was born.

1943  Rebellion in the Nazi death camp of Treblinka.

1943  World War II: PT-109 was rammed by the Japanese destroyer Amagiri and sank. Lt. John F. Kennedy, future U.S. President, saved all but two of his crew.

1944  Birth of the Socialist Republic of Macedonia.

1945 World War II: Potsdam Conference, where the Allied Powers discussed the future of defeated Germany, concluded.

1964  Vietnam War: Gulf of Tonkin Incident – North Vietnamese gunboats allegedly fired on U.S. destroyers, USS Maddox and the USS Turner Joy.

1967  The second Blackwall Tunnel opened in Greenwich, London.

1968  The 1968 Casiguran Earthquake hit Casiguran, Aurora, Philippines killing more than 270 people and wounding 261.

1973 A flash fire killed 51 at the Summerland amusement centre at Douglas, Isle of Man.

1980  A bomb exploded at the railway station in Bologna, killing 85 people and wounding more than 200.

1983 USS Texas was met by anti-nucelar protesters while visiting  Auckland.

Protest as USS Texas visits Auckland

1985 Delta Air Lines Flight 191, a Lockheed L-1011 TriStar crashed at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport killing 137.

1989  Pakistan was re-admitted back into the Commonwealth of Nations, for restoring democracy.

1989  1989 Valvettiturai massacre by Indian Peace Keeping Force in Sri Lanka killing 64 Tamil civilians.

1990 Iraq invaded Kuwait.

1992 Barbara Kendall won gold at Barcelona.

2005 –  Air France Flight 358, landed at Toronto Pearson International Airport, and ran off the runway causing the plane to burst into flames. There were 12 serious injuries but no fatalities.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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