Word of the day

July 20, 2015

Logorrhea – a tendency to extreme loquacity; incessant or compulsive talkativeness;  pathologically excessive and often incoherent talkativeness or wordiness.


Rural round-up

July 20, 2015

Farming mixes with writing at Triple Springs – Kate Taylor:

Drive the winding Weber road toward the coast from Dannevirke then turn west toward Waihi Falls. It’s tough, windswept country, but farmed with passion for the past seven years by husband and wife team Dennis Gloyn and Anita Lamb.

The 442ha property (400ha effective) is home to between 2000-2300 ewes lambing 125 per cent. About 550 ewe lambs are carried through as replacements.

Their flock is romdale returning to a romney base. “If we’re going to grow wool, we may as well grow plenty,” says Gloyn. . .

Gordon Stephenson Trophy Winners Keen To Spread Sustainability Message:

Left to right, Simon Saunders, Chairman of the New Zealand Farm Environment Trust, Catherine and John Ford, 2015 National Winners of the Ballance Farm Environment Awards.

Bay of Plenty farmers John and Catherine Ford were thrilled to win the National Winner title in the 2015 Ballance Farm Environment Awards. And they can’t wait to get out there to spread the message that good environmental management and good farming go hand in hand.

New Zealand Farm Environment Trust (NZFE) chairman Simon Saunders says the Fords will be excellent ambassadors for New Zealand agriculture. . .

 

A2 says FY earnings flat, sees growth in 2016; pooh-poohs takeover bid – Paul McBeth:

(BusinessDesk) – A2 Milk Co, which markets milk with a protein variant said to have health benefits, says annual earnings were flat and are set to triple in 2016 with sales expected to rise faster than forecast. Separately, the company has told its suitors to try again after an initial offer wasn’t compelling and drew out rival bidders.

Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation was unchanged at $4 million in the 12 months ended June 30, and are forecast to rise to $12 million in 2016, ahead of plan, the Auckland-based company said in a statement. Annual revenue rose 39 percent to $154 million, and A2 raised its 2016 sales target to $267 million from a previous forecast of $230 million due to growth in infant formula sales in Australasia and China, new product launches in Australia and New Zealand and the company’s launch into North America. . . .

Revised Dairy herd testing standard:

A revised dairy herd testing standard will help herd testers meet the objectives of the Dairy Industry Herd Testing Regulations.

The Dairy Industry (Herd Testing and New Zealand Dairy Core Database) Regulations 2001 require all herd testers to be certified and to submit the minimum data set required to characterise the performance of the national bovine dairy herd.

NZS 8100:2015 Dairy herd testing simplifies the provisions for farming businesses with multiple herds and farm dairies in similar environments, to allow the herds to be tested on the same day or on different days, as long as all cows are tested within an 8-day ‘herd test phase’. . .

 

Commission reconvenes conference and calls for final submissions on wool scouring authorisation:

The Commerce Commission is to reconvene its conference and seek final submissions on Cavalier Wool Holding Limited’s application for authorisation to acquire New Zealand Wool Services International’s wool scouring business.

The Commission hosted a public conference last month and has since received a number of further submissions. To ensure that all parties have an opportunity to respond to new information provided, the Commission is asking that final submissions be provided by Monday 10 August. . . .

Silver Fern Farms Sells Stake in Rendering Joint Venture:

Silver Fern Farms announced today that it has agreed to sell its 50 percent share in Farm Brands Limited to its partner Modena Investments – a company owned by Italian global rendering company Sapi and local management.

Farm Brands will continue to toll process and market meal and tallow for Silver Fern Farms. . .

 

 

From Biofortified.com:

AgBioWorld's photo.

Hillside organic vineyard supplying highly-acclaimed wine label for sale:

An established, organic Marlborough vineyard which has supplied grapes to celebrated wine label Churton, has been placed on the market for sale.

Located at 941 Waihopai Valley Road, the 22-hectare vineyard sits high above Marlborough in the Waihopai Valley. Planted across the rolling contours of the land , it encompasses predominantly sauvignon blanc and pinot noir grapes, along with small blocks of petit manseng, and viognier. . . .

 


Privilege of selective eating

July 20, 2015

Zoe Nicholson on the privilege of selective eating:

The ability to be so selective with what we eat is a Western world privilege.

Unfortunately an over-abundance of food is partly why we have so much unnecessary processed food-like food. The proliferation of such processed food is, I believe, a large part of why so many people are turning to different forms of eating, be it paleo, clean, gluten free etc. After all, if we only had fresh whole food available to us, the term “clean eating” probably wouldn’t even have arisen. I also suspect that if we only had fresh whole food available to us, and this includes grains and legumes, the “paleo diet” would not have come about either.

The one thing all these new styles of eating have in common is the elimination of highly processed food. Well almost, the food industry has responded with plenty of packaged paleo and “clean” food (aka processed food), which ironically is exactly how we got into this “food fight” in the first place. Watch this space, in a few years there will another style of eating to combat all the new food-like food that has infiltrated paleo and clean eating.

While all this goes on, there are millions of people in the world who are just happy to have whatever food is available. They are not interested if the food is gluten free, sugar free, clean, paleo or alkaline and most likely don’t even know the terms exist. 

Rice, maize and wheat provide 60 percent of the world’s food energy intake [source] . Of the top 10 crops in the world, all are carbohydrate rich food. I am not saying this is how it should be, but it is the current situation. The overwhelming majority of people in the world cannot afford (and I don’t mean financially) to eat “clean” or “paleo”. Luckily for them, they don’t need to because they are not exposed to an over-abundance of food, be it whole food or processed food.

However you choose to eat, try to keep things simple, stick to mostly whole fresh food, limit packaged food with multiple ingredients and be thankful you have access to so much nourishing food.

Try to avoid placing a moral value on how you eat or following a style of eating that doesn’t fit in easily with work, family, social events or travel. Why? Because this type of eating can foster an unhealthy relationship with food and can lead to disordered eating or eating disorders. If one of your reasons for following a specific style of eating is weight loss, then you also may be increasing your risk of body image dissatisfaction and lower self-esteem.

For centuries the problem with food was getting enough. It still is for most in the developing world and the poor in the developed world.

But those with more than enough which gives them the luxury of choice are worried about getting too much and/or whether what they are getting is the “right” food.

Most of us in the developed world have the privilege of selective eating and that’s made what and how much we eat a problem of our own making.


Do we have consensus on tax?

July 20, 2015

Labour finally answered the calls to show us some policy last week with an announcement on proposed changes to provisional tax:

The bad news for Labour was that it wasn’t its own fresh policy it was reheated National Party policy:

Acting Minister of Finance Steven Joyce has congratulated Labour Party Leader Andrew Little on finally announcing his first “new” policy after eight months in the job, although unfortunately for Labour it’s a cut and paste of a previous Government announcement.

“Labour announced today it was launching a discussion document on changes to provisional tax for businesses. However it seems to have overlooked that the Government launched its own discussion document containing almost identical proposals back in March,” says Mr Joyce. “These in turn were based on National Party policy at the last election.”

The Government has already consulted on proposed changes to provisional tax including a business PAYE, changes to use-of-money interest and penalties, increased use of tax pooling and the use of tax accounts. A Green Paper was launched on 31 March this year and submissions closed on 29 May.

“Feedback on the Green Paper’s suggestions has generally been supportive, and provisional tax was the part most commented on. As we’ve said previously, the changes will require new technology to be implemented, which will be developed as part of the IRD’s Business Transformation project,” says Mr Joyce.

“Quite why Labour has started its own consultation is beyond me.

“Submissions are now closed but the Government would be happy to accept a late submission from the Labour Party in support of the proposal,” Mr Joyce says. “We also appreciate its implied endorsement of the Business Transformation process that will make these policy changes possible.”

A link to  the March announcement can be found HERE.

A link to the Government’s Green Paper, Making Tax Simpler, can be found HERE.

A link to the National Party’s 2014 election policy on this issue can be found HERE.

Act supports the ideas in the green paper which the government released in March, last week New Zealand First also mooted a similar strategy and the Green Party is also open to the proposed changes.

The good news for all of us is that this could mean there is consensus on provisional tax which is very unpopular with businesses for good reason.

They have to pay on expected income without the benefit of a crystal ball that can give them an accurate forecast of their futures costs and income.

A reasonably accurate estimate is difficult enough for any business, it is particularly taxing in farming where there are so many variables and a lot of income is lumpy.

Dairy farmers get monthly payments for their milk but last year the pay out was far higher than expected, this year it is much lower.

Cropping, sheep and beef farmers and many horticulturists get most of their income in a very few payments a very few times a year. Estimating what they are likely to produce, how much that will cost and what they’ll be paid for it months in advance with any deegree of accuracy is next to impossible.

The changes proposed by the IRD which now seem to have support across the political spectrum would simplify the tax system.

Simpler taxes are less expensive to comply with and administer. That reduces costs for businesses which is good for them and the people they employ, service and supply.


Quote of the day

July 20, 2015

. . . What New Zealand needs is a departure from the way we finance our two tiers of government in a way that both of them are appropriately incentivised toward the goal of economic growth and development.

Imagine if both local and central government tax revenues reflected economic performance more directly.

Under such a system, we would see a different attitude of local communities to a range of activities from mining to housing.

It would provide a more balanced view to projects that at the moment would mainly be seen as a costly loss of amenity.

If Auckland could share in the increased income tax revenue that would flow to central government, Auckland could accommodate more people and this would better enable the council to finance the needed infrastructure. It would also make it easier for the council to make the case for residential development to the existing population because there would be something to be gained out of new development.

Such a system would also reduce the need for central government to intervene in local affairs. No longer would local government need to be pushed toward development because councils would be doing it out of self-interest. . . Dr Oliver Hartwich


July 20 in history

July 20, 2015

356 BC  – Alexander the Great, Macedonean king and conqueror of Persia, was born (d. 323 BC).

70 –  Siege of Jerusalem: Titus, son of emperor Vespasian, stormed the Fortress of Antonia. The Roman army was drawn into street fights with the Zealots.

911 Rollo laid siege to Chartres.

1304 Wars of Scottish Independence: Fall of Stirling Castle – King Edward I  took the stronghold using the War Wolf.

1402  Ottoman-Timurid Wars: Battle of Ankara – Timur, ruler of Timurid Empire, defeated forces of the Ottoman Empire sultan Bayezid I.

1656  Swedish forces under the command of King Charles X Gustav defeated the forces of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth at the Battle of Warsaw.

1712 Riot Act took effect in Great Britain.

1738  French explorer Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de la Vérendrye reached the western shore of Lake Michigan.

1810 Citizens of Bogotá, New Granada declared independence from Spain.

1822 Gregor Mendel, German scientist, father of modern genetics, was born (d. 1884).

1864 American Civil War: Battle of Peachtree Creek – Confederate forces led by General John Bell Hood unsuccessfully attacked Union troops under General William T. Sherman.

1866 Austro-Prussian War: Battle of Lissa – The Austrian Navy , led by Admiral Wilhelm von Tegetthoff, defeated the Italian Navy.

1881 Indian Wars:Sioux Chief Sitting Bull led the last of his fugitive people in surrender to United States troops at Fort Buford, North Dakota.

1885  The Football Association legalised professionalism in football under pressure from the British Football Association.

1892 – The Wellington and Manawatu Railway (WMR) Company’s locomotive No. 10 established a world speed record for the narrow 3 foot 6 inch (1067 mm) gauge, averaging 68 km per hour on a two-hour run and hitting a peak speed of 103 kph.

1893 George Llewelyn-Davies, English Peter Pan character model, was born (d. 1915).

1898  Spanish-American War: A boiler exploded on the USS Iowa off the coast of Santiago de Cuba.

1902 Jimmy Kennedy, Irish composer, was born (d. 1984).

1903 Ford Motor Company shipped its first car.

1917  World War I: The Corfu Declaration, which led to the creation of the post-war Kingdom of Yugoslavia, was signed by the Yugoslav Committee and Kingdom of Serbia.

1918  Cindy Walker, American singer, was born (d. 2006).

1919  Sir Edmund Hillary, New Zealand mountaineer and explorer, was born (d. 2008).

1921 – Congresswoman Alice Mary Robertson became the first woman to preside over the US House of Representatives.

1922 The League of Nations awarded mandates of Togoland to France and Tanganyika to the United Kingdom.

1924  Teheran, Persia came under martial law after the American vice-consul, Robert Imbrie, was killed by a religious mob enraged by rumors he had poisoned a fountain and killed several people.

1925  Jacques Delors, French President of the European Commission, was born.

1926 A convention of the Southern Methodist Church voted to allow women to become priests.

1928 The government of Hungary issued a decree ordering Gypsies to end their nomadic ways, settle permanently in one place, and subject themselves to the same laws and taxes as other Hungarians.

1930 Sally Ann Howes, English-born singer and actress, was born.

1932  In Washington, D.C., police fired tear gas on World War I veterans part of the Bonus Expeditionary Force, who attempted to march to the White House.

1932  Crowds in the capitals of Bolivia and Paraguay demanded their governments declare war on the other after fighting on their border.

1933 Buddy Knox, American singer and songwriter, was born (d. 1999).

1933  Vice-Chancellor of Germany Franz von Papen and Vatican Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli sign a concordat on behalf of their respective nations.

1933  In London, 500,000 marched against anti-Semitism.

1933  Two-hundred Jewish merchants were arrested in Nuremberg and paraded through the streets.

1934  Police in Minneapolis fired upon striking truck drivers, during the Minneapolis Teamsters Strike of 1934, killing two and wounding sixty-seven; Seattle police fired tear gas on and club 2,000 striking longshoremen, and the governor of Oregon called out the National Guard to break a strike on the Portland docks.

1935  A Royal Dutch Airlines plane en route from Milan to Frankfurt crashed into a Swiss mountain, killing 13.

1936 The Montreux Convention was signed in Switzerland, authorising Turkey to fortify the Dardanelles and Bosphorus but guaranteeing free passage to ships of all nations in peacetime.

1938 –  Dame Diana Rigg, English actress, was born.

1938 Natalie Wood, American actress, was born (d. 1981).

1940 – U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Hatch Act of 1939, limiting political activity by Federal government employees.

1941 Soviet leader Joseph Stalin consolidated the Commissariats of Home Affairs and National Security to form the NKVD and named Lavrenti Beria its chief.

1942  World War II: The first unit of the Women’s Army Corps began training in Des Moines, Iowa.

1943  Chris Amon, New Zealand racing driver

AmonChris19730706.jpg

1943  Wendy Richard, English actress (d.2009).

1944   World War II: Adolf Hitler survived an assassination attempt (known as the July 20 plot) led by German Army Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg.

1944  Franklin D. Roosevelt won the Democratic Party nomination for the fourth and final time at the 1944 Democratic National Convention.

1944   Fifty people were hurt in rioting in front of the presidential palace in Mexico City.

1944 Attempt to assassinate Adolf Hitler at his Rastenberg headquarters as part of Operation Valkyrie.

1945 John Lodge, English musician (The Moody Blues), was born.

1945 The US Congress approved the Bretton Woods Agreement.

1947  Police in Burma arrested former Prime Minister U Saw and 19 others on charges of assassinating Prime Minister U Aung San and seven members of his cabinet.

1948  U.S. President Harry S. Truman issued a peacetime military draft amid increasing tensions with the Soviet Union.

1948 Twelve leaders of the Communist Party USA were indicted under the Smith Act including William Z. Foster and Gus Hall.

1949 Israel and Syria signed a truce to end their nineteen-month war.

1950 Cold War: In Philadelphia, Harry Gold pleaded guilty to spying for the Soviet Union by passing secrets from atomic scientist Klaus Fuchs.

1951  King Abdullah I of Jordan was assassinated.

1953 Dave Evans, Australian singer (AC/DC), was born.

1953 Marcia Hines, American-born Australian singer, was born.

1954  Otto John, head of West Germany’s secret service, defected to East Germany.

1955 Jem Finer, English musician and composer (The Pogues), was born.

1958 Mick MacNeil, Scottish musician (Simple Minds), was born.

1959  The Organization for European Economic Cooperation admitted Spain.

1960 Ceylon elected Sirimavo Bandaranaike Prime Minister, the world’s first elected female head of government.

1960 – The Polaris missile was successfully launched from a submarine, the USS George Washington, for the first time.

1961  French military forces broke the Tunisian siege of Bizerte.

1964 Vietnam War: Viet Cong forces attacked the capital of Dinh Tuong Province, Cai Be, killing 11 South Vietnamese military personnel and 40 civilians (30 of whom were children).

1964 – The National Movement of the Revolution was instituted as the sole legal political party in the Republic of Congo.

1965 – Riots at Mt Eden prison followed a botched escape attempt and lasted into the next day.

1968  Special Olympics founded.

1969 Apollo Program: Apollo 11 successfully landed on the Moon.

1969 – A cease fire was announced between Honduras and El Salvador, 6 days after the beginning of the “Football War

1974 Turkish occupation of Cyprus: Forces from Turkey invaded Cyprus after a “coup d’ etat”, organised by the dictator of Greece, against president Makarios.

1976  The Viking 1 lander successfully landed on Mars.

1982   The Provisional IRA detonated two bombs in Hyde Park and Regents Park killing eight soldiers, wounding forty-seven people, and leading to the deaths of seven horses.

1984 Officials of the Miss America pageant asked Vanessa Lynn Williams to quit after Penthouse published nude photos of her.

1985  The government of Aruba passed legislation to secede from the Netherlands Antilles.

1989 – Burma’s ruling junta put opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi under house arrest.

1992 Václav Havel resigned as president of Czechoslovakia.

1997  – The fully restored USS Constitution (a.k.a. Old Ironsides) celebrated its 200th birthday by setting sail for the first time in 116 years.

1999 Falun Gong was banned in China, and a large scale crackdown of the practice is launched.

2012 – During a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises, a gunman opened fire at a movie theatre in Aurora, Colorado, killing 12 people and injuring 58.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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