Word of the day

June 6, 2015

Galenical – of a medicine made of natural rather than synthetic components; a herb or other vegetable drug, distinguished from a mineral or chemical drug; a standard medicinal preparation (as an extract or tincture) containing usually one or more active constituents of a plant and made by a process that leaves the inert and other undesirable constituents of the plant undissolved; relating to Galen.

 


Rural round-up

June 6, 2015

Biofuels, grain and the American Midwest – Keith Woodford:

The American Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently announced plans to reduce the 2015 and 2016 legal requirements for biofuels within American fuels. At the same time, the American Midwest looks like it could be heading for a bumper harvest year, possibly beating last year’s records.

The reason the Midwest is so important is that it is the American grain bowl. Increasingly, the Midwest is also becoming the centre of the American dairy industry. The twelve key contiguous states are Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas. . .

Nominations open for 2015 agribusiness leadership awards:

Nominations have opened for this year’s prestigious Rabobank Leadership Awards – recognising the contribution of outstanding leaders in New Zealand and Australia’s food and agribusiness industries.

The annual awards, which are now in their tenth year, acknowledge the important role played by senior leaders in New Zealand and Australia’s agribusiness and agri-related industries with the Rabobank Leadership Award, which was last year won by the Australian Farm Institute’s Mick Keogh.

A second award category now in its third year, the Rabobank Emerging Leader Award, recognises up-and-coming young leaders in the sector. In 2014, this award went to Bryce Camm from the Camm Agricultural Group. . .

Farmers keen to do their bit for meat export market boost:

Federated Farmers says the New Zealand meat export industry needs to make up lost ground with a boost to marketing New Zealand beef and sheepmeat overseas.

Meat and fibre spokesperson Rick Powdrell says the figures show primary industries in other countries are outmuscling New Zealand meat in our export markets.

“Beef + Lamb New Zealand has identified we aren’t putting enough effort into promoting our meat exports at the moment and it has been working with the meat industry to get a joint farmer/industry promotion of NZ$7 – $8m a year commitment together. I commend that.” . . .

 

Shape of the meat industry – Rick Powdrell:

The Meat Industry Excellence (MIE) report, Pathway to Long – Term Sustainability, has come and gone. Well that’s what it appears, as little of a positive nature has eventuated from its contents.

Why has that been the case?

For one, it would appear that few farmers have actually read it. So does that tell us farmers didn’t believe in MIE’s concept for the report, or that they don’t wish to engage in any industry discussions relating to structural change?

I would say both, as some farmers from all around New Zealand have expressed their feelings that industry structure should not be the main focus. . .

Government supports New Zealand forestry exporters to combat illegal logging:

The Government has today launched a new tool for exporters of New Zealand-grown forestry products to help combat illegal logging of tropical forests, Associate Primary Industries Minister Jo Goodhew says.

“From 15 June this year information statements will be available for our exporters to use when they send products to countries who have imposed requirements to combat illegal logging,” says Mrs Goodhew.

New Zealand’s legislation, and specifically the Resource Management Act 1991, mean that New Zealand’s planted forests are produced sustainably.

“New Zealand has a comprehensive regulatory system covering the legality and sustainability of the harvesting of our planted forests. We want to help our exporters tell this story,” says Mrs Goodhew. . .

Kauri dieback donation welcomed:

A generous donation towards protecting our native kauri tree from the ravages of kauri dieback disease has been welcomed by Conservation Minister Maggie Barry.

Sir Stephen Tindall and Julian Robertson will contribute $480,000 over the next three years through their Tindall and Aotearoa Foundations, targeted at protecting kauri.

$100,000 a year will go towards landowner’s efforts to stop livestock spreading the spores which cause the disease to kauri on their land. It will also fund public education and practical efforts such as hygiene stations at track entrances. . .

Calves and carers to get the best nutrition this season:

Calving time means lots of hungry mouths to feed on the farm so SealesWinslow has teamed up with the Dairy Women’s Network and celebrity chef Michael Van de Elzen to ensure both calves and carers get the best nutrition.

Calf rearing workshops, which began on 21 May and run through June and July will help rearers prepare for a successful season. Meanwhile Chef Van de Elzen will add seasoning to the sessions, providing recipe packs for fast, healthy meals to sustain farming families.

“I think my life is tough as a chef but farmers certainly work huge hours as well but often in very trying conditions. I’m excited to be supporting them with some tasty tucker,” said Mike. . .

 


Saturday’s smiles

June 6, 2015

Hours after the end of the world, a border dispute emerged between heaven and hell. Saint Peter invited the devil for a meeting to find a way to resolve the dispute.

The devil suggested a football game between teams with a team of players from heaven against one with players from hell.

Peter, who was honour-bound to be fair, said, “The heat must be affecting your brain, the game would be so one-sided you wouldn’t have a chance. Don’t you know all the good players come to us in heaven?”

The devil, responded with his trademark evil grin, Yeah, but we’ve got all the officials and referees.”


Flag of the day

June 6, 2015

The Flag Consideration Panel is inviting people to upload designs for a new flag.

There are more than 2000 in the gallery already.

This is New Zealand – Land of the Long White Cloud by Almog Shemesh:

flag

 


Saturday soapbox

June 6, 2015

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse but not to abuse.
The Good Wolf Manifesto's photo.

Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive. – Howard Thurman


June 6 in history

June 6, 2015

1508 Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, was defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces.

1513 Italian Wars: Battle of Novara. Swiss troops defeated the French under Louis de la Tremoille, forcing the French to abandon Milan. Duke Massimiliano Sforza was restored.

1523 Gustav Vasa was elected King of Sweden, marking the end of the Kalmar Union.

1644 The Qing Dynasty Manchu forces led by the Shunzhi Emperor captured Beijing during the collapse of the Ming Dynasty.

1654 Charles X succeeded his abdicated cousin Queen Christina to the Swedish throne.

1674 Shivaji, founder of the Maratha empire was crowned.

1683 The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford opened as the world’s first university museum.

1752 A fire destroyed one-third of Moscow, including 18,000 homes.

1799 Alexander Pushkin, Russian poet, was born (d. 1837).

1808 Napoleon’s brother, Joseph Bonaparte was crowned King of Spain.

1809 Sweden promulgated a new Constitution, which restores political power to the Riksdag of the Estates after 20 years of Enlightened absolutism.

1813 War of 1812: Battle of Stoney Creek – A British force of 700 under John Vincent defeated an American force three times its size under William Winder and John Chandler.

1823 Samuel Leigh and William White established Wesleydale, a Wesleyan (Methodist) mission station at Kaeo, near Whangaroa Harbour.

Wesleyan mission established

1832 The June Rebellion of Paris was put down by the National Guard.

1833 U.S. President Andrew Jackson became the first President to ride a train.

1844 The Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded in London.

1857 Sophia of Nassau married the future King Oscar II of Sweden-Norway.

1859 Queensland was established as a separate colony from New South Wales (Queensland Day).

1862 American Civil War: Battle of Memphis – Union forces captured Memphi, from the Confederates.

1868 Robert Falcon Scott, English explorer was born (d. 1912).

1882 More than 100,000 inhabitants of Bombay were killed when a cyclone in the Arabian Sea pushed huge waves into the harbour.

1882 The Shewan forces of Menelik defeated the Gojjame army in the Battle of Embabo. The Shewans capture Negus Tekle Haymanot of Gojjam, and heir victory leads to a Shewan hegemony over the territories south of the Abay River.

1889 The Great Seattle Fire destroyed downtown Seattle, Washington.

1892 Chicago El began operation.

1894 Governor Davis H. Waite orders the Colorado state militia to protect and support the miners engaged in the Cripple Creek miners’ strike.

1906 Paris Métro Line 5 was inaugurated with a first section from Place d’Italie to the Gare d’Orléans.

1912 The eruption of Novarupta in Alaska began.

1918 World War I: Battle of Belleau Wood – The U.S. Marine Corps suffered its worst single day’s casualties while attempting to recapture the wood at Chateau-Thierry.

1919 The Republic of Prekmurje ended.

1921 The Southwark Bridge in London, was opened for traffic by King George V and Queen Mary.

1923 V. C. Andrews, American author, was born (d. 1986).

1925 The Chrysler Corporation was founded by Walter Percy Chrysler.

1932 The Revenue Act of 1932 was enacted, creating the first gas tax in the United States, at a rate of 1 cent per US gallon (1/4 ¢/L) sold.

1933 The first drive-in theatre opened, in Camden, New Jersey.

1934 King Albert II of Belgium, was born.

1934 New Deal: U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Securities Act of 1933 into law, establishing the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

1936 Levi Stubbs, American musician (The Four Tops), was born (d. 2008).

1939 Adolf Hitler gave a public address to returning German volunteers who fought as Legion Kondor during the Spanish Civil War.

1942 Battle of Midway. U.S. Navy dive bombers sank the Japanese cruiser Mikuma and four Japanese carriers.

1944 Battle of Normandy began. D-Day, code named Operation Overlord, commenced with the landing of 155,000 Allied troops on the beaches of Normandy.

1944 Alaska Airlines commenced operations.

1946 The Basketball Association of America was formed in New York City.

1956 Björn Borg, Swedish tennis player, was born.

1964 Under a temporary order, the rocket launches at Cuxhaven, Germany, were terminated.

1966 James Meredith, civil rights activist, was shot while trying to march across Mississippi.

1968 Senator Robert F. Kennedy died from his wounds after he was shot the previous night.

1971 Soyuz 11 launched.

1971 A midair collision between a Hughes Airwest Douglas DC-9 jetliner and a United States Marine Corps McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II jet fighter near Duarte, California claimed 50 lives.

1971 Vietnam War: The Battle of Long Khanh between Australian and Vietnamese communist forces began.

1974 Sweden became a parliamentary monarchy.

1981 A passenger train travelling between Mansi and Saharsa, India, jumped the tracks at a bridge crossing the Bagmati river.

1982 1982 Lebanon War began. Forces under Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon invaded southern Lebanon in their “Operation Peace for the Galilee“.

1983 – Joe Rokocoko, Fijian rugby player and All Black was born.

Joe Rokocoko.jpg

1984 The Indian Army attacked the Golden Temple in Amritsar following an order from Indira Gandhi.

1985 The grave of “Wolfgang Gerhard” was exhumed in Embu, Brazil; the remains found were later proven to be those of Josef Mengele, Auschwitz’s “Angel of Death”.

1986 – Gin Wigmore, New Zealand singer/songwriter, was born.

1990 U.S. District court judge Jose Gonzales rules that the rap album As Nasty As They Wanna Be by 2 Live Crew violated Florida’s obscenity law; he declared that the predominant subject matter of the record is “directed to the ‘dirty’ thoughts and the loins, not to the intellect and the mind.”

1993 Mongolia held its first direct presidential elections.

1999 In Australian Rules Football, Tony Lockett broke the record for career goals, previously 1299 by Gordon Coventry which had stood since 1937.

2002 A near-Earth asteroid estimated at 10 metres diameter exploded over the Mediterranean Sea between Greece and Libya. The resulting explosion was estimated to have a force of 26 kilotons, slightly more powerful than the Nagasaki atomic bomb.

2004 Tamil was established as a Classical language by the President of India, Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam in a joint sitting of the two houses of the Indian Parliament.

2005 The United States Supreme Court upheld a federal law banning cannabis, including medical marijuana, in Gonzales v. Raich.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


%d bloggers like this: