Word of the day

May 7, 2015

Naprapathya system or method of treating disease that employs no medications but uses manipulation of muscles, joints, ligaments, etc., to stimulate the natural healing; medical treatment by manipulation of spine, thorax or pelvis.


Rural round-up

May 7, 2015

Bull-selling season prime for entertaining start – Kate Taylor:

Two counter-balancing influences are expected to have an impact on this year’s bull-selling season, says PGG Wrightson New Zealand livestock genetics manager Bruce Orr.

The season begins on May 12 with almost 100 bulls offered for auction at Te Pari Beef Expo in Feilding.

The bulls come from six different breeds, with 45 anguses, 28 herefords, 11 simmentals, six shorthorns, five gelbviehs and three south devons.

The bull sales are a gauge for how the season might progress.

Orr said the lead-in to this year’s sales had two distinct parts. . .

Genetics the answer for high quality pasture-fed beef – Pat Deavoll:

South Canterbury angus breeders Gerald and Sue Hargreaves are convinced New Zealand is missing the boat when it comes to producing high quality pasture-fed beef of an international standard.

The world wants grass-fed beef, Gerald Hargreaves says, but ours isn’t consistent or marbled enough to make the grade. He says the only way forward is with genetics and facts.

He “saw the light”, turning to genetics in 1994. He had worked for an angus breeder in Scotland in the mid 60s before moving back to New Zealand to take over the family farm – Kakahu Farm near Geraldine – and the accompanying angus stud, which his father had started in 1954. Originally almost all the bulls were sold to Molesworth Station, but in 1974 Gerald linked up with another local Angus breeder, George Hill, for his first sale. . .

2015 Sheep Industry Awards Finalists:

Finalists in the 2015 Beef + Lamb New Zealand Sheep Industry Awards have been announced today.

The awards are now in their fourth year and Beef + Lamb New Zealand chief executive, Dr Scott Champion said they were a great way of recognising and celebrating excellence in the industry.

“It’s right that we acknowledge the top performers and showcase our industry, which is a significant contributor to the New Zealand economy.”

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Farmer Council national chair, Martin Coup, who also chairs the awards judging panel, said the New Zealand sheep industry could take heart from the high quality and quantity of this year’s nominations. . .

 Sweet smell of success at Kiwi lavender farm – Nadene Hall:

Corry Zeestraten had spent so many years talking about one day running her own herb-based business, when her son sent her an email about a lavender farm for sale back in 2008, he wrote  “Mum, this is something for you as a joke!”.

But Corry and her husband Jan took one look at the advertisement for a 3.4ha block including show garden and commercial lavender crop a few kilometres inland from Kaikoura on the South Island’s east coast, and decided to take a look.

“I’d lived in Lincoln, close to Christchurch, for 40 years and we’d run a market garden,” says Corry. “I’d always had a really big herb garden and I’d always been keen on doing something with herbs. My son sent me a website link about this farm as a joke, but we went for a look straight away.” . .

Weak dairy prices prompt analysts to pull back Fonterra forecast payout for next season – Tina Morrison:

 (BusinessDesk) – Weak global dairy prices have prompted analysts to pull back their expectations for Fonterra Cooperative Group’s payout to farmers for next season.

Average prices dropped 3.5 percent in the GlobalDairyTrade auction overnight. New Zealand’s key product, whole milk powder, slipped an average 1.8 percent, extending its cumulative decline over the past five auctions to 27 percent.

Auckland-based Fonterra, the world’s largest dairy exporter, last week cut its forecast payout for the current 2014/15 season to $4.50 per kilogram of milk solids, from a previous forecast of $4.70/kgMS and last year’s record $8.40/kgMS, citing an oversupply in international markets and volatile commodity prices. . .

Pacific Seeds appoints Canterbury Seed Company for New Zealand distribution:

Pacific Seeds, part of the Australian owned Advanta Seeds Group has awarded Canterbury Seed Company (Canterbury Seed) its New Zealand distribution rights effective 1 June, 2015.

Subsequent to an internal restructure aimed at better servicing the New Zealand market and its farmers, Pacific Seeds wanted to partner with a distributor who was strong in local market knowledge and logistics.

Operating in New Zealand for over the past 23 years via selected agents and direct to clients, Pacific Seeds chose Ashburton based Canterbury Seed after many years of successful co-operative business dealings in other parts of the seed industry. “We know Canterbury Seed well – they are leading edge in the local New Zealand seed business, are passionate about quality and are customer centric in their approach,” said Pacific Seed Managing Director, Nick Gardner. “We are positive the Pacific Seeds range of products will be well represented and accessible across all North and South Island farming regions,” he said. . .

 


Thursday’s quiz

May 7, 2015

1. Who said: All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does. That’s his. ?

2.  To whom did Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert become parents?

3. It’s fille  in French,  figlia in Italian,  hija in Spanish and tamāhine in Maori, what is it in English?

4.  Name three living princesses by birth.

5.  Would you want to/did you know the gender of your children before they’re born?


Dairy price fall affects everyone

May 7, 2015

The fall-out from falling dairy prices isn’t confined to farmers:

. . .there are 7 billion reasons it will affect all of us. Seven billion dollars is the amount that is set to be wiped from the New Zealand economy this year.

Fonterra is forecasting a total payout to farmers this season of $4.70 to $4.80 per kilogram of milk solids ($4.50 forecast payout plus a likely dividend of 20 to 30 cents per share). That compares to last year’s record payout of $8.50 ($8.40 payout plus a cash dividend of 10 cents per share).

The average break-even point for farmers this year is $5.40, after you factor in both the cost of running the farm and the debt interest payments.

It is the reason farmers are cutting costs. That will be felt in towns and cities across New Zealand, from shops in rural towns to cities where manufacturers make equipment used on farms (like irrigation systems).

That will flow through to the taxes that the Government collects, making it even harder to put together this month’s Budget. . .

Although most New Zealanders live in towns and cities, what happens on farms and to the goods they produce still has a very big influence on the wider economy.

When produce prices fall, farmers tighten their belts which affects what they’re willing, and able to buy. That affects everyone who services and supplies them which flows into the wider economy and the tax take.


Quote of the day

May 7, 2015
For those who aspire to live in a high cost, high tax, big government place, our nation and the world offers plenty of options. Vermont, Canada and Venezuela all offer you the opportunity to live in the socialist, big government paradise you long for.  – Marco Rubio

By one calculation, today is Tax Freedom Day:

Staples Rodway says tax system needs to be more responsive to economic growth

This year’s Tax Freedom Day – the notional day of the year when New Zealand taxpayers stop paying tax and start earning for themselves – is May 7th, two days later than 2014 and four days later than 2013.

National accounting firm Staples Rodway, which is behind the Tax Freedom Day calculations, says while Kiwi companies and individuals are paying more tax, it’s not necessarily all bad news.

Staples Rodway Auckland Managing Director David Searle says: “The key driver of the growing tax take in recent years has been New Zealand’s post-global financial crisis economic recovery. As the economy has recovered, companies are growing and paying more tax, and people are spending more and therefore paying more GST.”

Mr Searle also pointed to ‘bracket creep’, which occurs when workers move into a higher tax bracket as their wages grow, as a reason for people paying more tax. . .

However, the Taxpayers’ Union says this annoucnement is premature:

“We are delighted that others have picked up our initiative from last year,” says Taxpayers’ Union spokesman Ben Craven. “Unfortunately this version by Staples Rodway doesn’t factor in local government nor public spending funded by borrowing.”

“Using the OECD measure gives a more accurate reflection on how long New Zealanders work for the government and allows for comparison with other countries. The current burden of government is 41.4% of GDP. For comparison Australia’s is only 36.1%.”

“This year tax freedom day is Sunday May 31, representing the 41.4% of the economy that is spent by the government. Last year’s tax freedom day was on June 4.”

That is four days earlier than last year which is a small move in the right direction but a bigger move is needed.

 

 


May 7 in history

May 7, 2015

558 – In Constantinopl, the dome of the Hagia Sophia collapsed, Justinian I immediately ordered that it be rebuilt.

1272 The Second Council of Lyons opened to regulate the election of the Pope.

1348  Charles University in Prague (Universitas Carolina/Univerzita Karlova) was established as the first university in Central Europe.

1429  Joan of Arc ended the Siege of Orléans, pulling an arrow from her own shoulder and returning, wounded, to lead the final charge.

1664  Louis XIV  inaugurated the Palace of Versailles.

1697  Stockholm’s royal castle was destroyed by fire.

1711 David Hume, Scottish philosopher and historian, was born (d. 1776).

1718  The city of New Orleans was founded by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville.

1748 Olympe de Gouges, playwright and feminist revolutionary, was born (d. 1793).

1763  Indian Wars: Pontiac’s Rebellion began – Chief Pontiac began the “Conspiracy of Pontiac” by attacking British forces at Fort Detroit.

1812 Robert Browning, English poet, was born (d. 1889).

1824  World premiere of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony in Vienna, conducted by Michael Umlauf under the deaf composer’s supervision.

1832 The independence of Greece was recognized by the Treaty of London. Otto of Wittelsbach, Prince of Bavaria was chosen King.

1836 The settlement of Mayagüez, Puerto Rico was elevated to the royal status of villa by the government of Spain.

1840  Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Russian composer, was born (d. 1893).

1840  The Great Natchez Tornado struck  Natchez, Mississippi killing 317 people.

1846 The Ngati Tuwharetoa village of Te Rapa on the south-western shore of Lake Taupo was obliterated in a landslide.

Devastating landslide at Lake Taupo

1847  The American Medical Association was founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

1847 Archibald Primrose, United Kingdom Prime Minister, was born (d. 1929).

1856 – Henry Sewell took office as colonial secretary – as early premiers were called, the first to hold this position in New Zealand.

1864  American Civil War: The Army of the Potomac, under General Ulysses S. Grant, broke off from the Battle of the Wilderness and moved southwards.

1888 – A meeting in Dunedin presided over by the mayor unanimously called for a ban on further Chinese migrants.

Anti-Chinese hysteria in Dunedin

1892 Josip Broz Tito, President of Yugoslavia, was born (d. 1980).

1895  Russian scientist Alexander Stepanovich Popov demonstrated to the Russian Physical and Chemical Society his invention, the Popov lightning detector — a primitive radio receiver.

1901 – Gary Cooper, American actor, was born (d. 1961).

1909 Edwin H. Land, American inventor ,was born (d. 1991).

1915  World War I: German submarine SM U-20 sank  RMS Lusitania, killing 1,198 people.

1919 Eva Peron, Argentine first lady, was born  (d. 1952).

1920  Kiev Offensive (1920): Polish troops led by Józef Piłsudski and Edward Rydz-Śmigły and assisted by a symbolic Ukrainian force captured Kiev.

1920  Treaty of Moscow: Soviet Russia recognsedthe independence of the Democratic Republic of Georgia.

1927 Angelos Sikelianos organised the first Delphic Festival in Delphi to celebrate the ancient Greek Delphic ideal.

1928 Dixie Dean scored a hat trick for Everton F.C. against Arsenal F.C. to set a new goal scoring record of 60 goals in a season.

1937 Spanish Civil War: The German Condor Legion, equipped with Heinkel He 51 biplanes, arrived in Spain to assist Francisco Franco’s forces.

1940 Angela Carter, English novelist and journalist, was born (d. 1992).

1942 During the Battle of the Coral Sea, United States Navy aircraft sank the Japanese Imperial Navy light aircraft carrier Shōhō. The battle marked the first time in the naval history that two enemy fleets fight without visual contact between warring ships.

1943  Peter Carey, Australian author, was born.

1944 Richard O’Sullivan, British actor, was born.

1945  World War II: General Alfred Jodl signed unconditional surrender terms at Reims ending Germany’s participation in the war.

1945 Christy Moore, Irish folk artist, was born.

1946 Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering (later renamed Sony) was founded with around 20 employees.

1946 Thelma Houston, American singer, was born.

1948 The Council of Europe was founded during the Hague Congress.

1952 The concept of the integrated circuit, the basis for all modern computers, was first published by Geoffrey W.A. Dummer.

1953  Ian McKay, British soldier (VC recipient) was born (d. 1982), .

1954 Indochina War: The Battle of Dien Bien Phu ends in a French defeat (the battle began on March 13).

1956 Jan Peter Balkenende, Prime Minister of the Netherlands, was born.

1960  Cold War: U-2 Crisis of 1960 – Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev announced that his nation was holding American U-2 pilot Gary Powers.

1964  Pacific Air Lines Flight 773, a Fairchild F-27 airliner, crashed near San Ramon, California, killing all 44 aboard; the FBI later reported that a cockpit recorder tape indicated that the pilot and co-pilot had been shot by a suicidal passenger.

1974 West German Chancellor Willy Brandt resigned.

1986 Canadian Patrick Morrow became the first person to climb each of the Seven Summits.

1992 Michigan ratified a 203-year-old proposed amendment to the United States Constitution making the 27th Amendment, which bars the U.S. Congress from giving itself a mid-term pay raise, law.

1992  Three employees at a McDonald’s Restaurant in Sydney, Nova Scotia, were murdered and a fourth permanently disabled after a botched robbery.

1992 – Latvia conducted its first post-Soviet monetary reform and began issuing Latvian rublis, a temporary currency in use until the introduction of Latvian lats. The move reduced the pressure on Latvian economy caused by shortage of cash and hyperinflation of rouble, and led way to ultimately successful economic reforms.

1995 Finland won the World Championship in men’s ice hockey after beating Sweden in the final

1998 Mercedes-Benz bought Chrysler for $US40 billion and formed DaimlerChrysler in the largest industrial merger in history.

1999  Pope John Paul II travelled to Romania becoming the first pope to visit a predominantly Eastern Orthodox country since the Great Schism in 1054.

1999  Kosovo War: In Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, three Chinese citizens were killed and 20 wounded when a NATO aircraft bombed the Chinese embassy in Belgrade.

1999 Guinea-Bissau, President João Bernardo Vieira was ousted in a military coup.

2002  A China Northern Airlines MD-82 plunged into the Yellow Sea, killing 112 people.

2007  The tomb of Herod the Great was discovered.

2009 – More than 100 police officers began a 40-hour siege of a lone gunman in Napier.

2013 – 27 people were killed and more than 30 injured, when a tanker truck crashed and exploded outside Mexico City.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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