Rural round-up

DOC and New Zealand Fur Council agreement a win-win – except for possums:

Greater conservation and economic benefits will follow an agreement signed by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and New Zealand Fur Council (NZFC) today.

DOC already works with individuals who wish to hunt and trap on conservation land, but this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the collective voice of the possum fur industry will make it easier for Fur Council accredited hunters and trappers across the country to gain access to public conservation land for fur recovery operations.

“We need more possum fur to increase the market size for New Zealand’s unique blended Brushtail possum yarns and garments,” says Neil Mackie, chairman of the New Zealand Fur Council. .

An iwi-based farming initiative:

A large Māori farming corporation in Whanganui is using a marae homestead near Waiōuru to train young adults from its iwi to run all of the incorporation’s farms.

The Awhiwhenua Land Based Training Farm School based at Ngā Mōkai Papakainga, under the shadow of Mount Ruapehu, is Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation’s third iteration of a training programme that its trust funds.

Chair of Te Ātihau Trust, Toni Waho, said that while its goal is to have uri (descendants) running all its farms, he admitted that the course was lacking a cultural and kaitiakitanga (guardianship) component. . .

Export statistics for the first half of the 2014-15 season:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand compiles lamb, mutton and beef export statistics for the country. The following is a summary of the first six months of the 2014-15 meat export season (1 October 2014 to 31 March 2015).

Summary
Strong demand and a weaker New Zealand dollar against the US dollar led to record high returns for beef in the first six months of this season, with the average per tonne value up 28 per cent, compared to the same period last season. Meanwhile, the total value of lamb exports rose slightly, despite lower export volumes.

October 2014 to March 2015 exports

 . . .

US burger demand bodes well for NZ beef farmers, economist says: – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – A trend towards eating out in the US, which saw sales at restaurants and bars overtake spending at grocery stores for the first time last month, bodes well for New Zealand farmers who produce beef for hamburger patties, an economist says.

The US is New Zealand’s largest beef market, accounting for 51 percent of the nation’s $2.65 billion of beef exports in the year through February, according to the latest trade data from Statistics NZ. Retail sales data released in the US yesterday showed younger Americans are more likely to eat out at fast-food restaurants, helping restaurant and bar sales overtake grocery for the first time since the data began in 1992, Bloomberg reported. . .

Minister meets four-legged border protectors:

Customs Minister Nicky Wagner acknowledged the valuable assistance the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service (ACBPS) Detector Dog Breeding and Training Centre has provided New Zealand Customs, on a visit to the Centre in Melbourne.

“I thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to meet the hardworking Customs staff – both four-legged and two – at the Detector Dog Centre,” Ms Wagner says.

“New Zealand Customs has been working with the ACBPS Detector Dog programme since 2002. The ACBPS provides up to five dogs a year under an agreement that has seen 27 dogs join NZ Customs since 2008. . .

How bad was this summer’s drought? – Andrew McMillan:

There are two interesting questions in regard to this summer’s drought. Firstly, how bad was it compared to other years. And secondly, how bad was it on a regional basis.

To answer these two questions, I grabbed some rainfall data from NIWA’s CliFlo Database and carried out the following analysis. . .

Waitomo-based Footwhistle Glowworm Cave celebrates 100 years guiding:

It is a momentous occasion for the team at the Footwhistle Glowworm Cave Tour in Waitomo as they celebrate a combined 100 years of Guiding. The small Family team of Four Guides have over 100 years of guiding experience between them.

“This is quite an achievement considering we only opened this cave tour in 2010,” says Kyle Barnes, owner-operator of the Footwhistle Glowworm Caves.

“Footwhistle Glowworm Cave is one of the largest systems in the Waitomo area and thanks to conservation measures and careful native planting over the past 20 years our system now supports some of the best Glowworm displays too,” he says. The absolutely stunning cave system is made up from stalactites, stalagmites and other cave formations growing from water dripping from the ceiling or flowing over the walls and leaving behind limestone deposits. . . .

 

One Response to Rural round-up

  1. Gravedodger. says:

    Re Possum fur.

    I have always been somewhat perplexed with the passive acceptance of the dramatic protest from people such as Bardot et al who vociferously decried the animal fur industry with totally unchallenged dialogue while an animal released here for its beautiful fur that had exploded in our luxuriant food supply to the point it was so destructive to our environment was directed against the control measure by-product it truly was.

    We have squandered years of opportunity to propel the fur, its blends with wool and the pelts ‘fur on’ all in a large part of the mindless and somewhat misdirected campaign against weasels and their cuzzies because they were farmed for their skins.
    Mink, Sable, Beaver, Possum have all spent gazillions of years developing the fibre and it is all of no account when some deluded celeb starts a crusade based on their personal belief and ignorance.

    The pathetic recent photo shopped efforts by PETA over the totally animal health compliant, humane harvesting of entirely renewable resource fibre fly in the face of any reasonable questioning of over hyped campaigners and the easily acquired yet totally ignored facts.
    That is just one more gaping hole in any residual credibility of media who fail to analyse, investigate or question publicity that should raise red flags from the source of such biased content.

    Yes footage of clubbing baby seals to access their fur can be seen as a diabolical barbaric activity but so many of those who allow their offence to be construed as a reason to ban something that has sustained people for centuries while at the same time promoting isolated deprived communities rights to exist on welfare with zero chance of accessing humanities progress is equally baffling.
    The fur is of course a natural product and its competition comes from petrochemical based industrialisation!!

    Life sure is a mystery at times.

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