Rural round-up

Southern Dairy Hub Great Farmer Investment:

The Southern Dairy Hub is an excellent investment for southern dairy farmers, as every dollar invested automatically delivers a $6 return.

That’s the view of Hedgehope dairy farmer Nigel Johnston, who has pledged his support for the Hub proposal and considers it a good investment for his farm business for a number of reasons.

“We need some decent science around what’s happening specifically in Southland and especially around nutrient management. A collective approach to that – like what’s being proposed with the Hub – is critical.” . .

 

Drystock farm ownership, what’s the path? – Kiwifarmer:

Drystock farm ownership, what is the path?

I have a collection of ideas on this and it’s a great discussion to be having.

With drystock farms increasing in value faster than individuals can save and are also realistically out of reach of the saving only model. How becomes a very good question!?

In recent times I’ve read suggestions about share farming and share cropping.

The sticking point for me with these arrangements is the risk and return. There has to be enough return or fat in the agreement that both party’s feel they get their fair share and in the case of the farm owner, they need a fair return on their capital. Which they may or may not currently be getting. . . 

New Zealanders Treat Soil like Dirt:

An international soil scientist claims that, too often, New Zealanders treat “soil like dirt” when it should be revered because “our lives depend on it.”

Dr John Baker says human life exists because of soil yet all that most people do is walk on it, dirty their shoes or dig it up and put buildings and roads on it.

“Soil is a living entity. It provides us with up to 90 percent of our food. There are more living organisms in a cupful of healthy soil than people on the planet,” he says.

Dr Baker says alarming figures provided by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the UK Farmers Weekly suggest that the quality of soil is rapidly diminishing. . .

New Zealand vintners pioneer low-alcohol techniques

(Reuters) — New Zealand’s cooler climate is giving its wine makers an edge as they seek to exploit growing global demand for lighter, premium wines.


Rising temperatures are pushing up the alcohol content of wines from rivals such as Australia and the United States.


The 2015 vintage of the country’s flagship Sauvignon Blanc will be the first produced under a government-backed initiative to research and produce wines that dispel the image of low-alcohol, low-calorie wines as overly sweet, inferior tastes.
 . .

Marlborough vineyard with growth opportunities goes up for sale:

A respected Marlborough vineyard producing award-winning sauvignon blanc grapes has been placed on the market for sale.

Located in the Awatere Valley, the vineyard is owned by the Van Asch family who are well-known for farming in the region for 150 years.

After spending more than a decade creating the vineyard from bare land and building up the business, the owners have decided the time is right to move on. The freehold property has been placed on the market with Bayleys by negotiation, with a closing date for offers of April 22. . .

 

Hat tip: Utopia

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