Word of the day

April 16, 2015

Anele – anoint someone, especially as part of the Christian rite of giving extreme unction to the dying.


Rural round-up

April 16, 2015

Call for Cantabs to think about future of water:

Canterbury would have much to gain from improving its water management practices but needs more information on how land use affects the water supply, Waterways Centre director Jenny Webster-Brown said during a recent talk at Lincoln University.

Almost three-quarters of New Zealand’s total water allocation comes from Canterbury, and current land and water use practices mean the future of the region’s water quality is far from certain, Dr Webster-Brown said.

“The region’s water management challenges have arisen for a unique combination of reasons. The main causes include a reliance on untreated groundwater for drinking, intense agriculture production and the fact that most of the population live in the lower catchments.”

Dr Webster-Brown said while a lot of water is used in irrigation on the plains, urban Christchurch residents go through around 400 litres of water each per day; one of the highest rates of city use in New Zealand or Australia. . .

 Student in take welcome:

A significant lift in numbers of students studying agriculture is overdue and ”great news” for the sector, Beef and Lamb New Zealand chief executive Dr Scott Champion says.

This year, Massey University recorded its biggest intake into agricultural qualifications for at least 25 years.

At Lincoln University, the Bachelor of Agricultural Science and Diploma in Agriculture programmes both attracted 20% more enrolments than last year. Enrolments doubled for the new Bachelor of Agribusiness and Food Marketing and the Master of Science in Food Innovation programmes.  . .

Local government funding reform good news – Dr William Rolleston:

Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you this evening. Federated Farmers has for many years been a strong proponent for reform of local government funding. We particularly support reduced reliance on the system of property rates, which in our view is inequitable from both the redistribution of wealth and the beneficiary pays perspectives.

Overall, rates revenue amounts to around 58 to 60 percent of the local government sector’s total operating revenue.

The difficulty with this system is that it seeks revenue for public goods from only those who own property in the community.  Thus the burden falls disproportionately on those who have relatively high value properties without necessarily the ability to pay. Compare for example rates paid by a super-annuitant living in their own home with a business such as the Warehouse in a provincial centre paying less in rates than an average farm. In fact rates constitute one of the top five expenses in many farming enterprises. . .

Nutrients Are Pesticides: The Dose Makes The Poison – The Foodie Farmer:

Most people find it odd that I am a Registered Dietitian who is licensed as a commercial pesticide applicator. I actually find it quite advantageous because what I studied in my nutrition degrees both undergrad and grad school, applies across multiple biological systems, not just human systems, but soil and plant systems too. Because I have a solid understanding of the science of nutrition, I therefore have a solid understanding of the science of pesticides. Many of the nutrients I studied as an RD, have applications as pesticides.

Paracelsus was correct when he coined the term “The dose makes the poison“. 

First, lets start with some definitions: . . .

 

Mr and Mrs Flowers – Thekitchensgarden:

Yesterday, after milking the cow and feeding the goats and the cows and the big pigs and the little pigs and the chickens of all descriptions, John and I loaded two dog crates into The Matriarchs jeep and went to the Bantam Swap. Do you remember last years Bantam Swap we brought home Godot and Carlos Garcia and the year before we brought home BooBoo and the year before that it was The Duke of Kupa. 

Well this year was just as successful. . .

Fruit and vegetable market ripe with growth opportunities goes up for sale:

A well-known fruit and vegetable market in Napier’s ‘Golden Mile’ – known as the centre of lifestyle, horticulture and market gardens – has been placed on the market for sale.

McKelvie’s Country Market is a long-established, family owned produce business operating from 284 Meeanee Road in Napier. The area is locally known as the ‘Golden Mile’ for its fertile soil resulting in the high quality fruit and vegetables produced and sold. . .

 


Thursday’s quiz

April 16, 2015

It’s your turn to ask the questions.

You don’t have to follow my five question format.

Anyone who stumps us all will win a virtual gift box of Whitestone cheese.


Conversations that Count

April 16, 2015

Today is Conversations that Count Day:

Start a conversation that counts – 16 April is Conversations That Count Day, to raise awareness about advance care planning so that people start thinking, talking and planning for their future and end of life care.

It might not be easy to start a conversation about the end of your life, but it is important. You can live out the end of your life just the way you would want.

This starts with talking about what you want with your partner, a mate, with the girls over lunch, at the kitchen table or with the whanau around the Barbie. . .

 End of life care is something most of us don’t broach until we’re forced to and by then it can be too late.

The Advanced Care Planning website is a good starting place:

Advance care planning gives everyone a chance to say what’s important to them. It helps people understand what the future might hold and to say what treatment they would and would not want. It helps people, their families and their healthcare teams plan for future and end of life care.

This makes it much easier for families and healthcare providers to know what the person would want – particularly if they can no longer speak for themselves. . .

An advanced care plan won’t be set in concrete, it can be changed.

The earlier it’s done the more likely it is to alter but whenever it’s done, it will provide guidelines on what is important to people and what they want if they are no longer able to make decisions for themselves.


GDT down 3.6%

April 16, 2015

The GlobalDairyTrade price index fell 3.6% in this morning’s auction.

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Quote of the day

April 16, 2015

Men do not fight for flag or country, for the Marine Corps or glory or any other abstraction. They fight for one another. And if you came through this ordeal, you would age with dignity. – William Manchester

I chose this quote in response to the RSA’s submission against changing the New Zealand flag.

The RSA argues we should ask the second question first so if the majority say no there’s no need for a second referendum.

The problem with that is that we wouldn’t know what the alternative would be and that will influence many people’s decision on whether or not they want change.

One argument against change used by the RSA, and others, is that the flag is the one soldiers fought under and it would be disrespectful to them to change it.

That is very much a matter of opinion.

New Zealanders fought under that flag. But they did that because it was the flag at the time, it doesn’t necessarily mean they had such a strong attachment to it that it would be dishonouring them if it was changed.

Like Manchester I think the armed services went to war for far more than the flag.

One rallying cry was for king and country . Those kings are long dead.

The RSA says it’s particularly disrespectful to be raising the question when we’re commemorating the centenary of Gallipoli.

But given the tragedy that was and the part played by British officers in what was in many ways a debacle, you could mount an even stronger argument that it would be respecting them to have a flag which didn’t carry the Union Jack.

You could also argue that a flag with a silver fern would be honouring them because that is the symbol on the graves of those who died .

My father was one of those who fought under the New Zealand flag although he’d only been out from Scotland a very few years.

He’s no longer here to ask his view on the issue but I can never recall him expressing any emotion about the flag.

He did however have strong views on independence and freedom . It was those for which he fought, not a flag.


April 16 in history

April 16, 2015

1178 BC; The calculated date of the Greek king Odysseus‘s return home from the Trojan War.

73 Masada, a Jewish fortress, fell to the Romans after several months of siege, ending the Jewish Revolt.

1346 The Serbian Empire was proclaimed in Skopje by Dusan Silni, occupying much of the Balkans.

1521 Martin Luther’s first appearance before the Diet of Worms to be examined by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and the other estates of the empire.

1582 Spanish conquistador Hernando de Lerma founded the settlement of Salta, Argentina.

1682 John Hadley, British inventor, was born (d. 1744).

1728 Joseph Black, Scottish chemist, was born (d. 1799).

1746 The Battle of Culloden was fought between the French-supported Jacobites and the Hanoverian British Government.

1780 The University of Münster was founded.

1799 Napoleonic Wars: The Battle of Mount Tabor – Napoleon drove Ottoman Turks across the River Jordan near Acre.

1853 The first passenger rail opened in India, from Bori Bunder, Bombay to Thane.

1862 American Civil War: The Battle at Lee’s Mills in Virginia.

1862 American Civil War: A bill ending slavery in the District of Columbia became law.

1863 American Civil War: The Siege of Vicksburg – ships led by Union Admiral David Dixon Porter moved through heavy Confederate artillery fire on approach to Vicksburg, Mississippi.

1865 Henry George Chauvel, Australian general, was born  (d. 1945).

1867 Wilbur Wright, American aviation pioneer, was born (d. 1912).

1889 Charlie Chaplin, English actor, writer, songwriter, composer, and film producer, was born (d. 1977).

1892 The New Zealand Rugby Football Union was founded.

Rugby Union founded

1910 The University of Queensland was founded, with the names of the members of the first Senate published in the Queensland Government Gazette.

1912 – News of the Titanic’s loss reached New Zealand.

1912  Harriet Quimby became the first woman to fly an aeroplane across the English Channel.

1917 Lenin returned to Petrograd from exile in Switzerland.

1918 Spike Milligan, Irish comedian, was born (d. 2002).

1919 – Gandhi organised a day of “prayer and fasting” in response to the killing of Indian protesters in the Amritsar Massacre by the British.

1921 Peter Ustinov, English actor, was born (d. 2004).

1922  Kingsley Amis, English author, was born (d. 1995).

1922 The Treaty of Rapallo, pursuant to which Germany and the Soviet Union re-established diplomatic relations, was signed.

1924 Henry Mancini, American composer, was born  (d. 1994).

1925 The St Nedelya Church assault in Sofia – 150 people were killed and 500 were wounded.

1924 Rudy Pompilli, American musician (Bill Haley & His Comets), was born (d. 1976).

1927 Pope Benedict XVI, born Joseph Alois Ratzinger, was born.

1939 Dusty Springfield, English singer, was born.

1941 World War II: The Italian convoy Duisburg, was attacked and destroyed by British ships.

1941 – Bob Feller of the Cleveland Indians threw the only Opening Day no-hitter in the history of Major League Baseball, beating the Chicago White Sox 1-0.

1943 Ruth Madoc, British actress, was born.

1943  Dr. Albert Hofmann discovered the psychedelic effects of LSD.

1945 The Red Army began the final assault on German forces around Berlin.

1945 The United States Army liberated Nazi Sonderlager (high security) Prisoner of War camp Oflag IV-C (better known as Colditz).

1945 – More than 7,000 died when the German refugee ship Goya was sunk by a Soviet submarine torpedo.

1946 Syria gained independence.

1947  Texas City Disaster: An explosion on board a freighter in port caused the city of Texas City to catch fire, killing almost 600.

1947 Bernard Baruch coined the term “Cold War” to describe the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union.

1953 Queen Elizabeth II launched the Royal Yacht HMY Britannia.

1963 – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. penned his Letter from Birmingham Jail while incarcerated in Birmingham, Alabama for protesting against segregation.

1963 Jimmy Osmond, American pop singer (The Osmonds), was born.

1972 Apollo programme: The launch of Apollo 16 from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

1973 – Arthur Allan Thomas was convicted of the Crewe murders for a second time.

1987 British Conservative MP Harvey Proctor appeared at Bow Street Magistrates’ Court charged with gross indecency.

1990 The “Doctor of Death”, Jack Kevorkian, went through with his first assisted suicide.

1992 The Katina P. ran aground off Maputo, Mozambique. 60,000 tons of crude oil spilt into the ocean.

2003 The Treaty of Accession was signed in Athens admitting 10 new member states to the European Union.

2004 – The super liner Queen Mary 2 embarks on her first trans-Atlantic crossing, linking the golden age of ocean travel to the modern age of ocean travel.

2007 Virginia Tech massacreSeung-Hui Cho, killed 32 and injured 23 before committing suicide.

2007 – President of Côte d’Ivoire Laurent Gbagbo declared the First Ivorian Civil War to be over.

2013 – A 7.8-magnitude earthquake strikes Sistan and Baluchestan Province, Iran, the strongest in the country in 40 years, killing at least 35 people.

2014 The MV Sewol ferry carrying more than 450 people capsised near Jindo Island off South Korea, leaving 295 passengers and crew dead and 9 more missing.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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