Quote of the day

To their credit, National has already identified that one of the key barriers to progress and development in many parts of the country is the Resource Management Act (RMA). This is certainly the case in Northland, which is rich in natural resources but poor in economic activity and jobs. But ironically for the people of Northland, by electing Winston Peters they may well have blocked the RMA reforms that are required to improve access to such resources.

The RMA is one of those Acts of Parliament that most people have little contact with. They are the lucky ones.

It’s the property owners and business people with initiatives that come into contact with the Act. Most come to dislike it intensely because they encounter first hand the extortionate demands of ‘affected parties’, the manipulation by activists, the huge costs extracted by the RMA industry, and the barriers put up by consenting authorities.

As a result, consents will often take years to go through the process – council hearings, the Environment Court, the High Court, the Court of Appeal, the Supreme Court, all costing applicants such vast sums of money, that in the end many are forced to abandon their project altogether. . .

While there are no doubt a multitude of ideas about how best to move resource planning forward to benefit the country – including the use of council case managers as advocates to guide applicants through the regulatory process and gain the cooperation of government agencies – at the heart of this matter is a realisation that holding back progress is not in the country’s best interest. Yes, we must be careful to minimise the impact of development on the environment, but we must also recognise that New Zealand families need economic growth and jobs if they are to thrive and prosper.

The irony is that as a result of the Northland by-election, the fate of the RMA is now in the hands of Mr Peters. Does he truly care about the long-term well-being of Northlanders, or is he too going to deliver more show than substance for his constituents – some new bridges and a bit of tar seal, when what they really need are jobs.  – Dr Muriel Newman,

14 Responses to Quote of the day

  1. RBG says:

    ‘manipulation by activists’ -evidence? No, just ACT making things up.

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  2. Mr E says:

    RBG – where were you during the ‘don’t cut the kauri’ debacle?

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  3. RBG says:

    It was public opinion that made the land owners back down on cutting the trees down Mr E.

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  4. Paranormal says:

    RBG it was ill informed public opinion spurred on by activists who are strangers to the truth and reality.

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  5. Mr E says:

    The man up the tree – not an activist? Nope?

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  6. TraceyS says:

    “The RMA is one of those Acts of Parliament that most people have little contact with. They are the lucky ones.”

    That is very true. Unfortunately I am not one of them.

    “As a result, consents will often take years to go through the process – council hearings, the Environment Court, the High Court, the Court of Appeal, the Supreme Court, all costing applicants such vast sums of money, that in the end many are forced to abandon their project altogether. . .

    Yep that’s right too – it’s open-season with your cheque book and no-one cares whether you had enough in there to begin with – or how little you’ll be left with. In fact, no-one can give you any idea how long the ‘season’ will last or how much money might be ‘enough’.

    It goes without saying that I would never enter a notified consent process, by choice, under this regime. I would be remiss in my duties to do so as the risk is unquantifiable.

    I empathise much with those who are, or may in future, have no other option in front of them, eg. http://www.odt.co.nz/regions/north-otago/337857/culmination-years-worry.

    And the many more to come.

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  7. RBG says:

    The man up the tree was most definitely an activist. He drew attention to the fact that the owners were going to cut it down. He did not use, or manipulate the RMA. His ‘actions’ drew media attention to the issue. The farmer who dumped the manure is also an activist.

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  8. Mr E says:

    “He did not use, or manipulate the RMA.”

    Even though the people had consent, the man climbed the tree, so not to manipulate the RMA. All he wanted to do was draw attention to the cutting down of the tree. He didn’t want to save it, despite saying so, nope, he was just there saying ‘look a kauri tree that’ll be cut down. Hmmmph!’
    No manipulation, nope. Just attention, that’s all he was doing. Attention seeking.

    Funny.

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  9. TraceyS says:

    Yes RBG. I agree they are both activists.

    One is an activist because it is his career, the other is an activist because his livelihood is on the line.

    You might not make much of that distinction, but I do!

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  10. RBG says:

    Your prejudice is showing TraceyS. The tree activist works at a plant nursery.

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  11. TraceyS says:

    Was his job on the line because of that Kauri tree? The jobs of all his workmates?

    It seems to me that cutting down trees probably creates more work for nurserymen rather than less.

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  12. TraceyS says:

    Btw are you one of the “lucky ones” RBG?

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  13. RBG says:

    Unlike you I’m not into making personal disclosures online. Right wingers only seem to care about things that affect them personally, so selfish. I’m over you lot, life’s too short to argue with self centred, prejudiced, scientifically illiterate people who can’t debate an issue without turning the discussion around to making it about the commenters. Have a nice Easter and try and think about things beyond your own personal experience. Eh noho ra.

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  14. TraceyS says:

    RBG,

    What I am into is making a difference in things I have personal experience with. It is human nature to be passionate about things close to one’s heart. If that is “prejudice” then I shall wear it on my sleeve.

    You are free not to read my comments and not to respond.

    Like

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