Word of the day

March 12, 2015

Periapt – an item worn as a charm against illness or misfortune;  amulet.


Rural round-up

March 12, 2015

Extra controls on 1080:

The Government has introduced tighter controls on high purity forms of 1080 in response to the criminal threat to use 1080 to contaminate infant and other formula, Environment Minister Dr Nick Smith announced today.

“I am satisfied that the controls for 1080 in the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act are robust, but with this criminal threat we are putting in place extra controls,” Dr Smith says.

High purity 1080 is highly toxic. It is mainly used for the manufacture of pest control baits, but small quantities are also used for research.

“The current regulations have an exemption for research laboratory use, as is the case for dozens of similarly toxic substances. This threat justifies putting in place additional controls that will require tighter security of high purity 1080 in laboratories, tracking of the quantity of the poison stored and used, and requiring Environmental Protection Authority certification of importers of high purity 1080 into New Zealand,” Dr Smith says. . .

Fears for 1080 milk scare repercussions

There are real fears about the knock-on effect to our dairy industry as the story about the 1080 milk powder threat makes news around the world.

Financial news service Bloomberg reported New Zealand’s clean, safe reputation is at risk, while the New York Times wrote our market has shuddered at the threat.

Reuters and the BBC also pointed to the potential economic fallout.

China remains our biggest market for milk powder, buying one-third of our dairy exports, but the news hasn’t made their front page headlines yet. . .

Game Animal Condemns 1080 Threat

“The Game Animal Council condemns attempts to blackmail New Zealand into stopping the use of 1080 poison” said Don Hammond, Chairman of the New Zealand Game Animal Council.

The use of 1080 poison has been controversial throughout its history with many groups and individuals being opposed to its use. There has been a significant increase in its use over the last year largely due to the Battle for our Birds programme. . .

Maori orchard success story:

Maori Trustee Te Tumu Paeroa says the success of a kiwifruit orchard on the East Coast is an example of how small blocks of Maori-owned land can be utilised to provide jobs and make a profit.

The Hamama Orchard, owned by Te Kaha 14B2 Trustees, recently won the PGG Wrightson Land and Life Award for commitment to people, community and passion for sustainable practice.

The Maori Trustee oversees the governance and management of the orchard. . .

Emphatic Winners in Northland Dairy Awards:

The 2015 Northland Sharemilker/Equity Farmers of the Year, Brad and Lesley Roberts, were emphatic winners – claiming the title along with six of nine merit awards on offer.

“I don’t think anyone was surprised when they were named the winners at the end of the night, as the merit awards proved they are very strong across all areas of their farm business,” Northland regional managers Ian Douglas and Rowena Butterworth-Boord said.

Brad and Lesley Roberts won $8500 in prizes at the 2015 Northland Dairy Industry Awards held at Toll Stadium in Whangarei last night . The other big winners were Karla Frost, who won the 2015 Northland Farm Manager of the Year contest, and Mike Jensen, the region’s 2015 Dairy Trainee of the Year. . .

Alps to Ocean cycleway put to test – Hamish Clark:

My ankle is sore, thighs are still burning and bumasaraus. Did I think the Alps 2 Ocean cycle ride would be easy? Yes. Was it easy? Yes and no. The hills got me every time.

I did it – me and seven other mad mates.

Five days – 301km – from Mt Cook to Oamaru – the destination was always to get to the sea, but it was the journey along the way that was the real highlight.

The Alps 2 Ocean cycle trail goes from New Zealand’s highest Mountain – Aoraki Mt Cook – past great lakes and rivers and down to the ocean. . .

 Big Fat Hen Marmalade Making Company produce great tasting home grown marmalade:

Formed in 2015, Heather’s Big Fat Hen Marmalade Making Company is New Zealand newest high quality marmalade company.

The knowledgeable and friendly team behind Heathers Big Fat Hen Marmalade Making Company, have a tradition of supplying the best quality jams and marmalades to the top hotels in New Zealand since last century.

These high-profile hotels include the Langham, Stamford, Millbrook and international flights out of New Zealand. . .

 

 


Thursday’s quiz

March 12, 2015

1. Who said: It will never rain roses: when we want to have more roses we must plant more trees.

2. What is the final couplet of this verse: I think that I will never see/ a billboard lovely as a tree . . .?

3.  It’s croître in French, crescere in Italian, crecer in Spanish and tupu in Maori.

4. What are Agathis australis, Cordyline australis and Dacrydium cupressinum more commonly known as?

5.  Which trees would you choose for wind breaks?


Conservation win, process and property rights lose

March 12, 2015

The owners of the  old kauri, the age of which is moot, have come up with a plan to save it.

In an open letter they write:

This is an open letter to the people of Auckland from myself John Lenihan and my wife Jane Greensmith, as today is our 20th wedding anniversary. Over these 20 years Jane and I have practiced as Architects who live and work in Auckland.

We have only ever built 2 houses for ourselves both in Titirangi.

The first house the year we got married, and I became a partner in RCG Ltd where I still work today. The second house we built 15 years ago and is the house our kids have grown up in. Both houses were on challenging sites, but as Jane’s Dad who was an Architect too, used to say “those are architect’s sites- difficult, complicated, fun and full of potential!”

As Architects we work in a city that we believe is under stress, as there is significant population growth. This is mostly from people like us having kids and because it is a great city.

But Auckland is under huge stress- it needs homes for extra people, and it needs affordable homes, and it needs homes of all types everywhere. This means change and many people hate change, and this adds more stress.

We wanted to be part of changing all this in our own small but optimistic way, so along with helping our clients achieve this, we thought we would try and build again and be our own client. We came across 2 lovely sites on Paturoa Rd and again they were “Architects sites”.

The rules for building in this part of Auckland and a lot of other areas are in our opinion very complex, often contradictory and from an outdated planning paradigm that gets added to in ad hoc ways that just keep making things worse.

The process to follow in making and processing applications is also too complex, contradictory and ad hoc.

There is very little certainty, so it is no wonder that Auckland is not building enough. Adding to this is the rapidly rising cost of land and building materials and you have the recipe for more stress. There are no easy answers to any of this, but we believe we all have to try.

This what we teach our kids.

We believe that the situation that has occurred at Paturoa Rd Titirangi is the outcome of the stress Auckland is under and the systems and processes we are given to work under. We believe that there needs to be a financial return for undertaking building work.

Banks require it when they give you a mortgage, they don’t call it a profit they call it the banks ”margin of risk”. Building is very risky, difficult, time consuming and prohibitively expensive.

Jane & I did not make the rules but we have to work with them and follow the law.

If we don’t, we lose the right to be Architects. We believe in law and order, but as Architects we also understand conflicting needs and different opinions, but to resolve these you need good systems and processes. We don’t believe these are good enough in the present regulatory process. The Auckland Unitary Plan might be an opportunity to change this, but not by keeping those old systems and paradigms. Maybe we need to try some brand new things.

Over the past few days we have been overwhelmed with the agendas of Council, Politicians, Protesters, and so on. We were quite normally private people but now we have been dragged into being public figures. We don’t have media training and crisis management skills and there are some who want us to take all the blame.

Our family, friends and colleagues and clients have been supporting us. So we have had to learn, adapt and change, because we are Architects and that’s what Architects are trained to do.

However we don’t want to play the games of others , games of blame, conflict, and abuse, instead we have been trying to come up with solutions where no-one loses everything but we all compromise, and is something new and hopeful that looks forward and not backward.

This is our Plan – Architects call it a design solution;

1. Let the trees stay including the Kauri which we have been calling 500, and the Rimu called 300. It doesn’t matter how old they are as they now need to stay. Some other trees might have to go – this is the compromise bit, but let’s keep it to a minimum. Trees grow faster than you all think.

Our wise elderly neighbour reckons the Kauri ”500” is only 70 years old like him.

2. Let’s turn these two sites from a place of conflict and division to a place of hope, a place to come together and plan a different future.

3. Let’s be innovative and consider new processes and new rules and prototype these and make it part of the Unitary Plan Process.

4. Let’s build on these sites as we need to keep property law intact and create homes. Our NZ is about family and community and nature. Can we try and have it all with small compromises?

5. Let’s build affordable, sustainable homes and try and fit as many as we can on these sites so that it works economically, socially and environmentally.

If we throw out the current rules we could do something a lot better than where we had got to with these houses.

6. Let’s take Jane and I out of the equation and give us fair compensation for our land and efforts to date as we have not broken the law and we need to encourage others to build and not be punished. Let’s respect the laws we have and try to improve them in the future.

7. Let’s allow Treescape and Vector, Iwi and Council to own the sites on the public’s behalf and let’s forgive them too. Give them a chance to try something new and create something better from this current mess. The compromise is they have to work together as a team and communicate quickly and professionally.

That’s our Plan and this is what Architects do.

We make plans for the future.

We hope everyone can support this, because then it will be the best 20th wedding anniversary!

If this is agreed to, it will be a win for conservation.

It is a loss for processes which are patently inadequate.

Those processes need to change to ensure no property owner is treated like this again.

And unless the  owners get compensation it will also be a loss for property rights.

People who follow due process and obey the law should not be out of pocket because other people don’t like the processes and disobey the law.

And Auckland still needs more houses.

P.S.

I wonder how many of those who protested against the felling will be willing to help pay the compensation?


Quote of the day

March 12, 2015

. . . our Nation is founded on the principle that observance of the law is the eternal safeguard of liberty and defiance of the law is the surest road to tyranny. The law which we obey includes the final rulings of the courts, as well as the enactments of our legislative bodies. Even among law-abiding men few laws are universally loved, but they are uniformly respected and not resisted. Americans are free, in short, to disagree with the law but not to disobey it. For in a government of laws and not of men, no man, however prominent or powerful, and no mob however unruly or boisterous, is entitled to defy a court of law. If this country should ever reach the point where any man or group of men by force or threat of force could long defy the commands of our court and our Constitution, then no law would stand free from doubt, no judge would be sure of his writ, and no citizen would be safe from his neighbors. . . John F. Kennedy.


March 12 in history

March 12, 2015

538  Witiges, king of the Ostrogoths ended his siege of Rome leaving the city in the hands of the victorious Roman general, Belisarius.

1622  Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, was canonized a saint by the Catholic Church.

1689 The Williamite war in Ireland began.

1821  Sir John Abbott, third Prime Minister of Canada, was born  (d. 1893).

1831 Clement Studebaker, American automobile pioneer, was born  (d. 1901).

1832 The Filippo Taglioni ballet La Sylphide received its première performance at the Paris Opéra.

1832 Charles Boycott, British land agent and source of the term to boycott, was born (d. 1897).

1864 Arthur’s Pass was “discovered”.

 Arthur's Pass 'discovered'

1868 Henry O’Farrell attempted to assassinate Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh.

1880 Henry Drysdale Dakin, British-American biochemist, known for the Dakin-West reaction, was born (d. 1952).

1881 Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, first President of Turkey was born (d. 1938).

1881 Andrew Watson made his Scotland debut as the world’s first black international football player and captain.

1894  Coca-Cola was sold in bottles for the first time.

1908 Rita Angus, New Zealand painter, was born  (d. 1970).

1912 The Girl Guides (later renamed the Girl Scouts of the USA) were founded in the United States.

1913  Canberra Day: The future capital of Australia was officially named Canberra.

1918 Moscow became the capital of Russia again after Saint-Petersburg held this status for 215 years.

1928 The St. Francis Dam in California failed, killing over 600 people.

1930 Mahatma Gandhi led a 200-mile march, known as the Dandi March, to the sea in defiance of British opposition, to protest the British monopoly on salt.

1932 Barbara Feldon, American actress and model, was born.

1933 Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed the nation for the first time as President of the United States in the first of his “fireside chats“.

1934 Konstantin Päts and General Johan Laidoner staged a coup in Estonia, and banned all political parties.

1938 Anschluss: German troops occupied Austria.

1940 Finland signed the Moscow Peace Treaty with the Soviet Union, ceding almost all of Finnish Karelia.

1946 Liza Minnelli, American singer and actress, was born.

1947 The Truman Doctrine was proclaimed to help stem the spread of Communism.

1948  James Taylor, American musician, was born.

1957 Marlon Jackson, American singer and musician (The Jackson 5), was born.

1966 Suharto became President of Indonesia.

1968  Mauritius achieved independence.

1971 The March 12 Memorandum, was sent to the Demirel government of Turkey and the government resigned.

1992 – Mauritius becomes a republic while remaining a member of the Commonwealth of Nations.

1993 Several bombs exploded in Mumbai killing about 300 and injuring hundreds more.

1993 North Korea said it planned to withdraw from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and refused to allow inspectors access to its nuclear sites.

1993 – The Blizzard of 1993 – Snow began to fall across the eastern portion of the US with tornadoes, thunder snow storms, high winds and record low temperatures.

1994 The Church of England ordained its first female priests.

2003 –  Zoran Đinđić, Prime Minister of Serbia, was assassinated in Belgrade.

2004 – A President of South Korea, Roh Moo-hyun, was impeached by its national assembly for the first time in the nation’s history.

2005 – Tung Chee Hwa, the first Chief Executive of Hong Kong, stepped down from his post after his resignation was approved by the Chinese central government.

2009 – Financier Bernard Madoff admitted to scamming $18 billion, the largest in Wall Street history.

2011 – A reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant melted and exploded and released radioactivity into the atmosphere a day after Japan’s earthquake.

2014 – An explosion in the New York City neighbourhood of East Harlem killed 8 and injured 70 others.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


%d bloggers like this: