Moderation movement

Among all the bad and mad advice on what and how and how much to eat, there is occasionally a voice of sanity:

There is more than one way to achieve wellness.  There is not one 'correct' way of eating or moving in order to be healthy.  Be wary of anyone who claims there is. If there's more than one path to wellness then how do you know which is the best way for YOU?   Here are my tips for finding your own healthy balance... YOUR best path to wellness will: Be sustainable for you Your habits could easily be sustained for the rest of your life.  They are not extreme behaviours that can only be followed for a short period of time.  They are suited to your lifestyle, your working hours, your family commitments and your preferences.   Make you feel great (long term) Your health habits should make you feel physically, mentally and emotionally better.  You should not feel guilty, anxious or obsessive.  (Those feelings are a sure sign you're not on the right wellness path for you).   Be flexible Your food and exercise choices should allow for social events, eating out, and celebrations.  Your ideal path to wellness recognises that these are an important part of your life and you should enjoy them without anxiety or guilt.   Get advice from true experts When you're feeling unwell you book in to see your GP.  When you need assistance with your eating or digestive issues you book to see a dietitian.  When you have an injury you book in to see a physiotherapist.  Your best path to wellness will let the true experts guide you, ignoring health trends and self-proclaimed health gurus. Be focused on how you feel and function (rather than how you look) Achieving wellness is about feeling energised, moving more easily, eliminating or reducing pain, boosting immunity, and reducing your risk of disease.  Feeling strong, fit, well and energised is awesome.  Shaping your body to look a particular way is not improving your wellness and it's worth reminding yourself of the difference regularly. Not follow others blindly Only you know what makes you feel better physically, mentally and emotionally.  Sometimes to sort it all out you'll need expert advice and consultation, but it's still your journey, your choice.  Just because a friend or family member feels fabulous eating one way, or doing particular exercise, doesn't mean you will too.   Be open to discussion and new evidence When you're on your best path to wellness, you don't feel the need to defend it aggressively.  You're open to discussing other's ways of eating and exercising.  You don't judge other's paths because you know they're choosing their own way, like you're choosing your own way.  You don't shame others.  You're willing to read new research or hear from experts and you make your own decisions about it.  You feel confident in your choices because they are YOURS. Have I forgotten anything?  How do you know when you're on the right (or wrong) path to wellness for YOU? - Jodie, Healthy Balance Fitness

 

There is more than one way to achieve wellness. There is not one ‘correct’ way of eating or moving in order to be healthy. Be wary of anyone who claims there is.

If there’s more than one path to wellness then how do you know which is the best way for YOU?

Here are my tips for finding your own healthy balance…

YOUR best path to wellness will:

* Be sustainable for you

Your habits could easily be sustained for the rest of your life. They are not extreme behaviours that can only be followed for a short period of time. They are suited to your lifestyle, your working hours, your family commitments and your preferences.

* Make you feel great (long term)

Your health habits should make you feel physically, mentally and emotionally better. You should not feel guilty, anxious or obsessive. (Those feelings are a sure sign you’re not on the right wellness path for you).

* Be flexible

Your food and exercise choices should allow for social events, eating out, and celebrations. Your ideal path to wellness recognises that these are an important part of your life and you should enjoy them without anxiety or guilt.

* Get advice from true experts

When you’re feeling unwell you book in to see your GP. When you need assistance with your eating or digestive issues you book to see a dietitian. When you have an injury you book in to see a physiotherapist. Your best path to wellness will let the true experts guide you, ignoring health trends and self-proclaimed health gurus.

* Be focused on how you feel and function (rather than how you look)

Achieving wellness is about feeling energised, moving more easily, eliminating or reducing pain, boosting immunity, and reducing your risk of disease. Feeling strong, fit, well and energised is awesome. Shaping your body to look a particular way is not improving your wellness and it’s worth reminding yourself of the difference regularly.

* Not follow others blindly

Only you know what makes you feel better physically, mentally and emotionally. Sometimes to sort it all out you’ll need expert advice and consultation, but it’s still your journey, your choice. Just because a friend or family member feels fabulous eating one way, or doing particular exercise, doesn’t mean you will too.

* Be open to discussion and new evidence

When you’re on your best path to wellness, you don’t feel the need to defend it aggressively. You’re open to discussing other’s ways of eating and exercising. You don’t judge other’s paths because you know they’re choosing their own way, like you’re choosing your own way. You don’t shame others. You’re willing to read new research or hear from experts and you make your own decisions about it. You feel confident in your choices because they are YOURS.

Have I forgotten anything? How do you know when you’re on the right (or wrong) path to wellness for YOU?

This comes from the Moderation Movement.

14 Responses to Moderation movement

  1. robertguyton says:

    Moderation! That’s a dirty word around here.

  2. fredinthegrass says:

    Care to expand your comment Rg?
    I havent rated you yet!

  3. Mr G says:

    Fred – I’m being moderated, that is, all of my comments are kept by Ele until she can be bothered to decide whether they threaten the peace here on Homepaddock – it’s classic authoritarianism – Ele knows perfectly well that I have been a model of good manners and compliance, but she chooses to disable my involvement here with her dictatorial behaviour. Sometimes, she keeps my mild and thoughtful comments imprisoned for up to 13 hours at a stretch! Do you think that’s fair? So, Fred, that will, I hope, explain my comment at 11:30. If you get to read this at all (sometimes Ele “disposes” of my comments and doesn’t publish them at all), it may be a day after I wrote it. Bullying, that’s what I call it. Equal opportunity? Not here in the Homepaddock.

  4. jabba says:

    moderation is something naughty people should get used to on other peoples bogs. Before banning myself from Redablurt, I was put into moderation, no idea why.
    Mr G is upset for some reason. I understand that one of his Gween mates, bOb Guyton, has a blog and he puts those who are not in his world into moderation. Can’t confirm that but maybe others can.

  5. Mr G says:

    jabba applies his own form of self-moderation – his infantile language and pre-school punctuation skills make his blurtings unreadable, thus negating the need for Ele to toss him into the Pit of Moderation – he’s in his own Sand-pit of Sel-moderation, unseen, un-read and uncared-for (poor wee fell fell). I’ve tried to help you out of there, Jabba, generously lifting you up by your bib-straps, gently easing your grammer-pain, dabbing your potty-mouth with the corner of your own spittle-flecked apron, but you’ve doggedly clung to your toddleriffic ways, throwing your toys, pulling the stuffing out of your softies and suck, suck, sucking away at your lint-encrusted rusk and sticking like Karetane Yellow to your blanket – I don’t know why I bothered. You need a Nanny McPhee or a Mary Poppins! They’d make that horrid medicine go down, Jabba – and you’d like it, I know you would.

  6. Mr G says:

    “Can’t confirm that but maybe others can.”

    The very essence of Jabba.

  7. jabba says:

    yOu are so easy bOb, I mean Mr G.
    I guess you decided to ignore your own little errors bOb .. remember in one of your posts, there was not one but two, or is that to or indeed too spulling mustakes but hey, we all know you meant too even though you wrote to. I decided to point it out to, or is that too or indeed two, you, but as usual bOb, I mean Mr G, you ignored it because you can dish it out but, like a little bully boy, can’t take it.

  8. Ray says:

    <i.Personal attacks, Ray. Mr G. You are becoming synonymous with them.

    And you wonder your dribblings comments are moderated.!

    infantile pre-school punctuation blurtings (poor wee fell fell). bib-straps, potty-mouth spittle-flecked toddleriffic suck, suck, sucking.
    etc.

    Any clues there do you think?
    Pretty classy stuff.

  9. TraceyS says:

    self-moderation!
    Karitane!
    Grammar!

    Doggedly you cling to your “toddleriffic” self-made non-words, throwing insults at others without looking behind at the ‘quality’ of your own childish utterings.

    I can see why Ele prefers to publish these gems. Smart woman!!

  10. Mr G says:

    Pouring great gobs of wordage over “Jabba” is not a personal attack, Ray – “Jabba” is not a person, it’s a construct, a false-persona, a nom-de-plume that has no substance. Now if “Jabba” used a real name with a link that verified his real existence, I’d refrain from hounding “him” over “his” apparent faults, but as things stand, “he’s” not real. In Dave Kennedy’s case, he is using his real name, he does have a verifiable link and you hide-behind-a-false-namers here are rounding on him with personal attacks. My point is clear. Your understanding falls well short of good. It’s to be expected. It’s how you righties “think”. You can’t see beyond it, I know, as does Dave and RBG, to their eternal frustration.
    TraceyS – “toddleriffic” is not a word I made. You need to expand your vocabulary and provide a link to show that you are real – “TraceyS” could easily be an obese white-guy, sweating over his pc somewhere in Kansas, guffawing over how his “Tracey” persona has been swallowed by those chumps at Homepaddock over in good ol’ Noo Zilland.

  11. Mr G says:

    And “Karitane”? You think I invented, Karitane?
    I guess, living in Kansas, you’ll have no knowledge of New Zealand place names.

  12. Mr G says:

    Oh, and in case you haven’t noticed, Homies, you are swarming again!

  13. TraceyS says:

    Way back when I first started commenting you decided that I must be a PR person for Fonterra. Now I’m an obese white guy from Kansas. You’re all over the place Robert!

  14. TraceyS says:

    You entertain “hide-behind-a-false-namers” (another silly made up term) when it suits you, Robert. Both here, on your own blog, and in your very regular practice of re-quoting “hide-behind-a-false-namers” from a left-wing blog. Often this is to aim criticism at the Prime Minister – who does go by his real name. So I doubt that you’d refrain from hounding commenters who used their own name. Rather, it would be open-season on anyone who dared to disagree with your politics.

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