Word of the day

January 16, 2015

Entropy – lack of order or predictability; gradual decline into disorder; the natural tendency of the universe to fall apart into disorder;  a thermodynamic quantity representing the unavailability of a system’s thermal energy for conversion into mechanical work, often interpreted as the degree of disorder or randomness in the system.


Rural round-up

January 16, 2015

Goodman Fielder to commercialise three new products with health benefits – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – Goodman Fielder, the food ingredients manufacturer facing a takeover from Wilmar International and First Pacific Co, will commercialise three new food products this year with health benefits for consumers – the first of a pipeline of innovation into smart foods.

The three patented products include a new baking product with enhanced health properties and two dairy products with improved sensory and health attributes, the company said in a statement.

Goodman Fielder research and innovation senior manager Shantanu Das said he couldn’t say more about the products at this stage other than they should reach shop shelves in the next 12 months and “the public will judge for themselves”. . .

 

Sanford Welcomes Efforts of New Zealand Authorities to Stop Illegal Fishing:

As one of only two New Zealand companies permitted to source toothfish from the Ross Sea fishery, Sanford  welcomes the current efforts of the New Zealand Government, Navy and other New Zealand agencies to fight illegal fishing in the waters of Antarctica.

This week the HMNZS WELLINGTON intercepted three vessels fishing illegally in the Southern Ocean. Two of the vessels refused to allow New Zealand Navy personnel to board despite their flag states granting approval.

“Illegal fishing poses many dangers, not only for the environment and fish stocks, but also for responsible licensed crew and vessels that may be called upon to assist in the search and rescue of these rogue operators when they get into trouble operating in these remote and isolated areas,” says Greg Johansson, Sanford’s Chief Operations Officer. . .

 Criticism of Navy over illegal fishing operation unjustified:

Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says ill-informed criticism of the Royal New Zealand Navy’s operation involving illegal fishing in the Southern Ocean ignores the success of the operation.

“The offshore patrol vessel Wellington and its crew have done a very good job in very challenging conditions in the Southern Ocean.

“They have successfully located, tracked and intercepted these vessels, and obtained the necessary evidence and documentation to enable further enforcement steps to be taken by the appropriate authorities. . .

Hydroponic herb business ‘never stops’ – Sue O’Dowd:

Even though summertime is salad time, the seasons make little difference to a vast North Taranaki hydroponic herb growing operation, as Sue O’Dowd discovers.

 All year round, herbs and assorted young salad greens fly out the door of a North Taranaki glasshouse to restaurants and supermarket shelves around New Zealand.

Natural Fare has created a nationwide reputation for the quality and flavour of its produce since Russell and Jan Jordan set up the business at Bell Block in the early 1980s.

New Plymouth Fresha owner Stephen Shaw, who has 20 years international experience as a chef, said that without doubt Jordan’s products were world-class. Not only were Natural Fare herbs fresh, each leaf in his mesclun mix had its own distinct flavour. . .

Taranaki dairy cow numbers on the rise – Sue O’Dowd:

Dairy cows in Taranaki have increased by more than 10 per cent the last 20 years as herd numbers have fallen almost a third.

Latest figures from DairyNZ put the number of cows in the province in 2013-14 at just over 493,000 in 1719 herds, about 54,500 more than the 1992-93 season when there were 2587 herds.

Taranaki farmers own 10 per cent of the country’s dairy cows and 14 per cent of herds.

At nearly 175,000ha, the amount of land used for dairy farming in Taranaki was slightly more in 1992-93 than in 2013-14 when it was just over 173,000ha. The current figure represents 10 per cent of the land used for dairy farming in New Zealand. . .

Historic multi-peril payouts – Gregor Heard:

AUSTRALIAN farmers are set to receive what are believed to be the first substantial payouts for multi-peril crop insurance (MPCI) within days.

Chief executive of Latevo International Andrew Trotter said his company had been told by its reinsurer that it would be paid for its first three claims and was currently finalising the formalities for payment to proceed.

He said he hoped it would be the final step towards widespread farmer acceptance of MPCI. . .

 


Friday’s answers

January 16, 2015

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: To say that you can kill in the name of God is blasphemy.?

2. Which are the four major religions (by number of followers) in the world?

3. It’s croire in Friench, credere in Italian, creer in Spanish and whakapono in Maori, what is it in English?

4. In which countries were the Shinto and Jainism religions founded (each in a different country)?

5. Should blasphemy be a criminal offence?

Points for answers:

Andrei wins a virtual box of apricots, peaches and nectarines with a clean sweep.

J Bloggs got four right.

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


This Girl Can

January 16, 2015

Love the line I jiggle therefore I am:


Write positive

January 16, 2015

Labour’s campaign slogan vote positive didn’t have the impact it sought but new leader Andrew Little is seeking someone to write positive:

. . . Little is advertising for a new chief press secretary to head the party’s media and communications strategy, and the successful applicant is expected to ensure Little appears “in a positive story on the 6pm news at least twice a week”.

Positive news coverage depends on what the leader, the caucus and the party saying and doing..

No amount of spin will counter the mixed messages, ill-judged policy, caucus dissent and party disunity which has dogged Labour for several years.

Other key targets put emphasis on social media, including 100,000 “likes” for the party’s Facebook page, up from about 38,000 now, and 40,000 “likes” for Little’s Facebook page by the 2017 election. It currently boasts 10,422 “likes”.

Little’s new spin doctor will also be expected to increase Labour’s email contact list to 200,000 by the 2017 general election, from about 87,000 now.

Electronic communication is cheap but few beyond political tragics are interested in party communications.

One of the best ways to increase the contact list would be by increasing the membership from its current state of around 10,000 at best but that is the job for the party not a publicly funded press secretary.

The advertisement has already prompted senior press gallery reporters to plot creative ways to thwart another expected result – weekly meetings with key press gallery journalists. . .

That’s key with a small k.

Positive media coverage is helpful but it’s not enough in itself.

John Key and National won their third term with an extra seat in spite of unrelenting negative media coverage.

That’s because they had a proven track record, a disciplined caucus, a strong united party and of course a leader who genuinely likes people and is liked in return.

Labour has a long way to go to equal that and it will take a lot more than positive media releases to do it.


January 16 in history

January 16, 2015

27 BC  The title Augustus was bestowed upon Gaius Julius Caesar Octavian by the Roman Senate.

1120 The Council of Nablus was held, establishing the earliest surviving written laws of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem.

1362 A storm tide in the North Sea destroyed the German city of Rungholt on the island of Strand.

1412 The Medici family was appointed official banker of the Papacy.

1492 The first grammar of the Spanish language, was presented to Queen Isabella I.

1547  Ivan IV of Russia (Ivan the Terrible) became Tsar of Russia.

1556  Philip II became King of Spain.

1581 The English Parliament outlawed Roman Catholicism.

1605 The first edition of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha (Book One of Don Quixote) by Miguel de Cervantes was published in Madrid.

1707  The Scottish Parliament ratified the Act of Union, paving the way for the creation of Great Britain.

1853 – Andre Michelin, French industrialist, was born (d. 1931).

1853  Gen Sir Ian Hamilton,  British military commander, was born  (d. 1947).

1874  Robert W. Service, Canadian poet, was born (d. 1958).

1883 The Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, establishing the United States Civil Service, was passed.

1896  Defeat of Cymru Fydd at South Wales Liberal Federation AGM, Newport, Monmouthshire.

1900 The United States Senate accepted the Anglo-German treaty of 1899 in which the United Kingdom renounced its claims to the Samoan islands.

1901 Frank Zamboni, American inventor, was born (d. 1988).

1902 – Eric Liddell, Scottish runner, was born (d. 1945).

1903 William Grover-Williams, English-French racing driver and WWII resistance fighter, was born  (d. 1945).

1906  Diana Wynyard, British actress, was born (d. 1964).

1908 – Ethel Merman, American actress and singer, was born (d. 1984).

1909 Ernest Shackleton’s expedition found the magnetic South Pole.

1919  The United States ratified the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, authorising Prohibition in the United States one year after ratification.

1941 The War Cabinet approved the formation of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF) to enable the Royal New Zealand Air Force to release more men for service overseas. Within 18 months a Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps and Women’s Royal Naval Service had been created.

Women's Auxiliary Air Force founded

1942  Crash of TWA Flight 3, killing all 22 aboard, including film star Carole Lombard.

1944 Jim Stafford, American singer and songwriter, was born.

1948 Dalvanius Prime, New Zealand entertainer, was born (d. 2002).

1952 – King Fuad II of Egypt, was born.

1959 Sade, Nigerian-born singer, was born.

1970  Buckminster Fuller received the Gold Medal award from the American Institute of Architects.

1979 The Shah of Iran fled Iran with his family and relocated in Egypt.

1986 First meeting of the Internet Engineering Task Force.

1991  The United States went to war with Iraq, beginning the Gulf War (U.S. Time).

1992 El Salvador officials and rebel leaders signed the Chapultepec Peace Accords in Mexico City ending a 12-year civil war that claimed at least 75,000.

2001 – The First surviving Wikipedia edit was made: UuU

2001  Congolese President Laurent-Désiré Kabila was assassinated by one of his own bodyguards.

2001  US President Bill Clinton awarded former President Theodore Roosevelt a posthumous Medal of Honor for his service in the Spanish-American War.

2002 The UN Security Council unanimously established an arms embargo and the freezing of assets of Osama bin Laden, Al-Qaida, and the remaining members of the Taliban.

2003  The Space Shuttle Columbia took off for mission STS-107, its final one. Columbia disintegrated 16 days later on re-entry.

2006 Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was sworn in as Liberia’s new president becoming Africa’s first female elected head of state.

2013 – An estimated 41 international workers were taken hostage in an attack in the town of In Aménas, Algeria.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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