Word of the day

December 18, 2014

Balter – to dance artlessly, or clumsily usually without practiced form or skill but usually with enjoyment; tumble.

Photo


Rural round-up

December 18, 2014

Alarm over off-road toll -Timothy Brown:

Federated Farmers Otago president says children on four-wheeled bikes are a reality of rural life despite damning statistics and some calling for a ban.

A report released yesterday said off-road vehicle accidents accounted for the second-highest number of recreational deaths of children, behind only swimming and other water activities.

The findings focused on four-wheeled bikes, which accounted for more than a third of the deaths, and highlighted children’s vulnerability when using vehicles designed for adults.

Federated Farmers Otago president Stephen Korteweg said the statistics were ”pretty alarming”, but the practicalities of farm life meant children would continue to drive off-road vehicles, and particularly four-wheeled bikes. . .

Quads Bikes Not for Under 16s

Safekids Aotearoa strongly supports recommendations made in a report released today highlighting the dangers posed by quad bikes when ridden or controlled by children who are under 16 years of age.

The Child & Youth Mortality Review Committee (CYMRC) report ‘Child and youth mortality from motorcycle, quad bike and motorised agricultural vehicle use’ looked into 33 child deaths caused by off road motor vehicles from 2001-2012. This includes 12 deaths caused by quad bikes.

According to Safekids Aotearoa, 30 children die or are hospitalised every year as a result of quad bike injuries. . .

Minister welcomes predator control venture:

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry has welcomed an innovative partnership to dramatically transform the way invasive predators are managed on mainland New Zealand.

The NEXT Foundation has partnered with philanthropists Gareth Morgan and Sam Morgan, and the Department of Conservation, to set up the Zero Invasive Predators (ZIP) project. All parties are contributing funding to the venture, with DOC providing $500,000 per year for an initial three years.

The ZIP project will focus on developing the tools and systems needed to permanently remove introduced predators from large areas of mainland New Zealand. . . .

Zespri forecasts record grower returns for 2014/15 season:

Record per-hectare returns for Green and Organic Green are forecast this season as a combination of supply constraint, favourable market conditions and strong end-of-season sales leads to increased Zespri grower returns across all categories. Per-hectare returns for Green growers are forecast at $52,987 and Organic Green at $42,207.

Zespri Chief Executive Lain Jager says these returns are the result of great work from growers, the post-harvest sector, the Zespri team onshore and in the markets, and our retail and trade partners.

Mr Jager explains the overall result reflects some unique, one-off factors. “A shortage of supply of Green kiwifruit from Chile and constrained supply of Gold kiwifruit from New Zealand have supported pricing, while Zespri’s foreign exchange hedging policy has mitigated against the strong value of the New Zealand dollar.” . . .

 

Time for Jobs that Count in the Meat Industry:

The NZ Meat Workers Union will launch a new national campaign to highlight job insecurity in the Meat Industry this afternoon in Palmerston North.

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, National Secretary.

“Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements.

“As if that’s not enough, the government’s recent Employment Law changes mean meat workers will face a tougher time settling collective agreements and earning a decent living. . .

Celebrating 30 years in business:

New Zealand’s largest animal feed exporter and world-leading fibre nutrition company, Fiber Fresh Feeds, is celebrating 30 years in business by giving away nearly ten tonne of feed to horse riders at one of the country’s biggest equine events.

As the naming right sponsor of the Fiber Fresh Taupo Christmas Classic from December 18-21, New Zealand’s second largest equestrian event behind Horse of the Year and the largest event by horse number in the Southern Hemisphere, Fiber Fresh is giving a free bag of feed to each of the 450 riders at the event. . .

Farmer AKA Mechanic, Agronomist, Engineer, Economist, Businessman, Accountant, Architect, Doctor,  Manager, Electrician, Plumber, Veterinarian, Market Analyst, Meteorologist, Communicator, Teacher, Conservationist, Nutritionist, Carpenter, Biologist, Technician, Trucker, Maintenance worker, etc. (PETERSON FARM BROS ORIGINAL)

Farmer AKA Mechanic, Agronomist, Engineer, Economist, Businessman, Accountant, Architect, Doctor, Manager, Electrician, Plumber, Veterinarian, Market Analyst, Meteorologist, Communicator, Teacher, Conservationist, Nutritionist, Carpenter, Biologist, Technician, Trucker, Maintenance worker, etc.

(PETERSON FARM BROS ORIGINAL)


Running of the Wools

December 18, 2014

The Hilux New Zealand Rural Games will be starting with a baaaa:

A spectacle not seen in Queenstown for decades will be staged again next February as more than 300 merino sheep run through the town centre to herald the start of the inaugural Hilux New Zealand Rural Games over the Waitangi holiday weekend.

The ‘Running of the Wools’ is planned as a dramatic celebration of the region’s farming heritage evoking memories of early settlers and highlighting the merino’s continued importance to New Zealand’s rural economy. The free event takes place on Waitangi Day, Friday 6 February and is co-sponsored by the Otago Daily Times and clothing and gift retailer, Global Culture.

Beginning at midday, merinos will leave pens on Athol Street and run over the Ballarat Street bridge by the Village Green. They then turn right onto Camp Street before turning left into Beach Street and running all the way down to finish at Earnslaw Park.

Spectators will have plenty of opportunities along the barrier-lined route to witness a forgotten side of Queenstown’s history.

From the early settler period, sheep were regularly transported from surrounding high country stations into Queenstown, including some by barge across Lake Wakatipu, before continuing to Dunedin for processing and export.

All stock for the Running of the Wools are being transported via road by Northern Southland Transport. They include around 300 dry stock – merino whethers and ewes – from Mt Nicholas Station on the south side of Lake Wakatipu and around 50 horned rams from Bendigo Station near Tarras. Bendigo was home to the globally famous merino ram ‘Shrek’ who grew the world’s heaviest fleece while evading muster for several years.

merino(Bendigo merinos at home on the station)

 

Hilux New Zealand Rural Games founder and trustee, Steve Hollander said it was going to be an amazing spectacle for locals and visitors alike. “

This will be a sight to behold! It’s easy to forget that sheep farming powered Queenstown’s economy long before it became one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations,” he said. “The merino is a real symbol not only of that high country heritage but also of the huge contribution farming continues to make to our national economy. Just think of the global phenomenon of merino clothing that began right here in Otago and continues to grow.”

Mr Hollander said he hoped to make the Running of the Wools an annual event to tie in with the Games itself. The Hilux New Zealand Rural Games feature several national championships for sports including speed shearing, sheep dog trials, speed fencing, gumboot throwing and coal shovelling as well as four Highland Games ‘heavy’ events and the Trans-Tasman ANZAXE Wood Chopping Championship.

Entertainment on both days is provided by the Topp Twins who also open a live concert on the Saturday evening headlined by local country pop sensation, Jody Direen. Tickets for the two-day Games and concert are now sale via Ticket Direct. For more information visit the event website at www.ruralgames.co.nz.

The Rural Games aim to bring together the sports that built the nation:

At the heart of the Games are a series of traditional sports attracting top competitors from throughout New Zealand and Australia. You can expect to see several national and world champions battling for the first Hilux New Zealand Rural Games titles.

Together with Sport New Zealand and rural sports associations around NZ we’ve developed exciting new formats for competitive wood chopping, sheep shearing, sheep dog trials, speed fencing, coal shovelling, speed gold panning and other traditional sports. We’ll also be hosting the ANZAXE Wood Chopping Championship, Highland Games ‘heavy’ events and a feature event of the 2015 ANZ Young Farmer Contest, the Silver Fern Farms Agri-Sport Challenge – always a crowd favourite!

As well as the competitive element, the Games will feature a fun-packed festival programme including a live concert featuring NZ country pop sensation Jody Direen, daily entertainment from the Topp Twins, fun participation events like cherry stone spitting and wine barrel racing, kids activities plus delicious local food and wine.

Rural sports organisations have their individual events across the country through out the year.

The Rural Games will bring them together in Queenstown with competitions for elite sports people. There will also be less serious sections for people from the crowd to take part in.

P.S. I chair the trust which is running the games.


$40,000 fines too much

December 18, 2014

Federated Farmers believes farm safety isn’t helped by punitive fines:

Federated Farmers Health and Safety spokesperson, Katie Milne says she is concerned about the impact of the $40,000 fine for a Marlborough farm couple, who weren’t wearing helmets and carrying children as passengers.

The Court case, and subsequent ruling, runs the risk of alienating farmers who will see the fines as heavy handed and excessive. It will make it so much harder to get the right health and safety messages across if the primary sector is sceptical as to what is occurring.

“No one wants to see serious accidents and deaths. We need good information and evidence in the public domain that not only drives the identification of major health and safety risks, but subsequently the priorities, education and persuasion to change behaviour.”

“There needs to be a real focus on good outcomes.”

Katie Milne says Federated Farmers has recently been working closely with WorkSafe New Zealand to improve farm safety.

“WorkSafe have been saying to us that they want to avoid heavy handed actions and put a high value on education and persuasion.  We will be talking to them about how this is done more effectively.”

“Farmers can improve their safety performance.  And we will not be fooling ourselves into thinking that only other people have accidents or that there is no inherent risk in farm environments or work.”

She concluded “Fundamentally, safety is enhanced by concentrating on outcomes, increased awareness, and changing behaviour.  This sort of public issue is just going to get farmers’ backs up and make them feel picked on – not make them safer farm operators, which is what we want.”

Quad bikes are dangerous and the couple had received several warnings though there are two sides to the story of those warnings:

. . . But Carlson – who became the first woman to win the West Coast Top of the South Farm Manager of the Year in 2010 – says the fine is unfair and accused WorkSafe of not doing its job properly.

“I don’t think $40,000 is fair,” she told Radio Live.

“If you put it in perspective with other offences like drink driving, where you are putting other people at risk … it’s ridiculous and out of proportion.”

WorkSafe says even after a prohibition notice was issued, Carlson was caught twice riding her quad bike without a helmet and on the second occasion she had two children with her.

Carlson said the agency has been inconsistent in the advice it gave her.

“If they had done their job properly we’d never be in this position,” she said.

It wasn’t the requirement to wear helmets that she disagrees with, but the way it was enforced, said Carlson.

“They want to take people to court to make an example of them.

“I totally see their point, that helmets have a place on a quad bike and I think everybody should be wearing it.”

WorkSafe NZ spokesman Francois Barton said it could not ignore Jones’ and Carlson’s wilful refusal to meet their legal obligations. . .

Whatever the advice, $40,000 – $20,000 each –  does seem to be a very steep fine.


Suffer the little children

December 18, 2014

Evil is the only word to describe people who target innocent children:

Pakistan has begun three days of mourning for the 132 children and nine school staff massacred by the Taliban in the country’s deadliest ever terror attack.

The 141 people were killed when insurgents stormed an army-run school in the northwestern city of Peshawar and systematically went from room to room, shooting children during an eight-hour killing spree.

The attack, claimed by the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) as revenge for a major military offensive in the region, sparked worldwide condemnation and led the Pakistani government and military to reaffirm their determination to defeat a group that has killed thousands since 2007.

Teenage survivor Shahrukh Khan, who ducked below his desk with classmates when four gunmen burst into their room, described how he played dead after being shot in both legs, stuffing his tie into his mouth to stifle his screams.

“I saw a pair of big black boots coming towards me, this guy was probably hunting for students hiding beneath the benches,” the 16-year-old said from the trauma ward of the city’s Lady Reading Hospital.

“The man with big boots kept on looking for students and pumping bullets into their bodies. I lay as still as I could and closed my eyes, waiting to get shot again,” he said.

“My body was shivering. I saw death so close and I will never forget the black boots approaching me – I felt as though it was death that was approaching me.”

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif announced three days of national mourning and described the attack as a “national tragedy unleashed by savages”. . .

In the past children might have been hurt or injured as a result of war but this targeting of them is a relatively new and sickening development.

Nothing justifies the wanton slaughter of innocent children.


December 18 in history

December 18, 2014

218 BC – Second Punic War: Battle of the Trebia – Hannibal’s Carthaginian forces defeated those of the Roman Republic.

1271  Kublai Khan renamed his empire “Yuan” (元 yuán), officially marking the start of the Yuan Dynasty of Mongolia and China.

1620 – The Mayflower landed in present-day Plymouth, Massachusetts with 102 Pilgrims on board.

1642  Abel Tasman and his men had the first known European encounter with Maori.

First contact between Maori and Europeans

1707 Charles Wesley, English Methodist hymnist, was born (d. 1788).

1777 The United States celebrated its first Thanksgiving, marking the recent victory by the Americans over General John Burgoyne in the Battle of Saratoga in October.

1778 Joseph Grimaldi, English clown, was born (d. 1837).

1849 Henrietta Edwards, Canadian women’s rights activist, was born (d. 1931).

1863 Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria, was born (d. 1914).

1878 Joseph Stalin, leader of the Soviet Union, was born  (d. 1953).

1888 – Richard Wetherill and his brother in-law discovered the ancient Indian ruins of Mesa Verde.

1890 Edwin Armstrong, American inventor (FM radio) was born (d. 1954).

1898  Gaston de Chasseloup-Laubat set the new land speed record going 39.245 mph (63.159 km/h), in a Jeantaud electric car. This is the first recognised land speed record.

1900 The Upper Ferntree Gully to Gembrook Narrow-gauge (2 ft 6 in or 762 mm) Railway (now the Puffing Billy Railway) in Victoria opened.

1908  Celia Johnson, English actress, was born (d. 1982).

1910 – Eric Tindill, New Zealand cricketer and rugby player, was born  (d. 2010).

1912 The Piltdown Man, later discovered to be a hoax, was found in the Piltdown Gravel Pit, by Charles Dawson.

1913 Willy Brandt, Chancellor of Germany, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, was born (d. 1992).

1916  Betty Grable, American actress, was born  (d. 1973).

1935  Jacques Pépin, French chef, was born.

1938 Chas Chandler, English musician (The Animals), was born (d. 1996).

1943  Keith Richards, English guitarist (The Rolling Stones), was born.

1946  Steve Biko, South African anti-apartheid activist, was born  (d. 1977).

1946 – Steven Spielberg, American film director, was born.

1963 Brad Pitt, American actor, was born.

1966 Saturn‘s moon Epimetheus was discovered by Richard L. Walker.

1969  Home Secretary James Callaghan‘s motion to make permanent the Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) Act 1965, which had temporarily suspended capital punishment in England, Wales and Scotland for murder (but not for all crimes) for a period of five years, was carried by both the House of Commons and the House of Lords.

1973 Soyuz 13, crewed by cosmonauts Valentin Lebedev and Pyotr Klimuk, was launched.

1987  Larry Wall released the first version of the Perl programming language.

1997  HTML 4.0 was published by the World Wide Web Consortium.

1999 NASA launched into orbit the Terra platform carrying five Earth Observation instruments, including ASTER, CERES, MISR, MODIS and MOPITT.

2006 – The first of a series of floods struck Malaysia. The death toll of all flooding was at least 118, with over 400,000 people displaced.

2009 – The 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference closed with the signing of the Copenhagen Accord.

2010 – Anti-government protests began in Tunisia, heralding the Arab Spring.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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