Sol3 Mio tops Lorde for album of year

December 17, 2014

Sol3 Mio has beaten Lorde to the top of the charts again:

. . . In the New Zealand Albums chart Sol3 Mio and Lorde finished number one and number two respectively, for the second year in a row.

On the overall album charts Sol3 Mio’s self-titled record managed to come in second only to Ed Sheeran’s hugely popular X.

“Sol3 Mio don’t get radio play, but they are quite clearly stars. Their live performance translates into the record, and word of mouth is enormously popular in this country,” says Mr Vaughan.

Sol3 Mio’s record is now seven times platinum. . .

I don’t think this takes into account digital downloads and So3 Mio’s win could reflect the age of their fans who might be older and more likely to buy a CD or DVD than download music on the internet.

Though, I number myself among their fans and am more comfortable with discs than digital versions but I did download their album.


Word of the day

December 17, 2014

Abreption – The action of snatching something away; sudden seizure; complete separation or removal; an instance of this.


Rural round-up

December 17, 2014

WMP recovery predicted – Hugh Stringleman:

Fonterra’s third substantial milk price forecast reduction this season will bite dairy farmers in January and sentence them to a bleak winter next year.

Fonterra has inevitably followed the international dairy price slump by revising its milk price forecast downwards by 60c to $4.70/kg milksolids (MS).

The $6 billion turnaround from last season to this one will also hit rural servicing businesses as dairy farmers cut spending to essential inputs. . .

Wear helmets on quad bikes – they’re part of the job:

A farming couple from Canvastown near Blenheim have been fined $20,000 each for offences involving the use of quad bikes on the farm where they have a share-milking partnership.

There were multiple sightings, dating back to 2012, of Phillip Andrew Jones and Maria Anna Carlson riding quads without helmets and in some cases Ms Carlson had small children with her on the quad.

Ms Carlson was witnessed twice riding her quad without a helmet after a prohibition notice had been issued and the second time she had two young children with her on the bike. . .

Generating wealth from dairy – Keith Woodford:

The current dairy downturn is inevitably turning attention to the wisdom of having so many eggs in the same basket. When times look rough, it can be helpful to look back and remind ourselves of the journey we have travelled to get where we are.

The driving forces that have led to the present have had very little to do with industry policy. Rather, the outcomes we are now experiencing are the consequence of thousands of individual farmers and rural investors deciding that dairy was where the profits lay. And to a large extent they got it right.

Taxation policy is the one key area where governments have influenced investor behaviour. The longstanding taxation policy of all governments has been to not tax capital gain. . .

A passion for prestige farming – Sue O’Dowd:

Enthusiastic Wairarapa farmers Matt and Lynley Wyeth are putting the beef and sheep industry in the spotlight.

The couple were keynote speakers at last week’s inaugural Taranaki Big Dine In for Taranaki sheep and beef farmers at Stratford.

The 2014 Greater Wellington Ballance Farm Environment Award winners say they love sheep and beef farming and they’d like to see its success celebrated.

“It’s our turn to shine,” Matt Wyeth said. “We want to thrive, not just survive. . .

5 ways to avoid a bad fencing job – Nadene Hall:

There’s one really easy way to know if a fence is well built: a good fence is one you don’t notice. That’s the golden rule of experienced contractor Simon Fuller, the President of the Fencing Contractors Association of NZ (FCANZ). 

“It blends in, there’s no sudden rises, humps and hollows, it’s a flowing fence, especially on a lifestyle block, unless you’re wanting to make a statement in an entranceway. 

“For me, as a contractor, I notice poor fences before I notice good fences because a good fence is there and it’s not offensive to the eye, where a poorly constructed fence… as a rule, fences that are poorly constructed, you will keep on finding things wrong with them, there will be numerous things wrong with them, not just one.”  . . .

Dairy cattle total rises to 6.7 million:

The number of dairy cattle in New Zealand continued to rise, to reach 6.7 million at the end of June, Statistics New Zealand said today.

“Generally good pastoral conditions since the previous June contributed to the increase,” agriculture manager Neil Kelly said.

In the same one-year period, sheep, beef, and deer numbers fell. The number of sheep declined by 1.2 million, to 29.6 million as at June 2014.

These provisional figures are from the 2014 Agricultural Production Survey, which Statistics NZ conducted in partnership with the Ministry for Primary Industries. . .

Hawke’s Bay economy gets major boost from fruit innovation:

Havelock North Fruit Company has announced new investment and a major facility expansion and to meet global demand for its award winning Rockit apple brand.

Havelock North Fruit Company (HNFC) managing director Phil Alison today announced a new major facility in Havelock North, set to open in March 2015 as well as further investment into growing and globally supplying the miniature apple.

Already over $14 million has been invested in the production and marketing of Rockit, with a further $10m projected in the next three years. . .

CRV Ambreed celebrates 45 years of business:

It’s a momentous year for CRV Ambreed, who this-year celebrates its 45th year in business.

The company, now part of the world’s third largest artificial breeding company, has come a long way in the last 45 years.

It was set up by a small group of farmers in 1969 under the company name American Breeders Service. The founders began operating in a facility on the outskirts of Hamilton in 1970, with a core business of dairy semen production for the New Zealand market.

Managing Director Angus Haslett said the company has had ‘a couple of changes’ since then, the most recent and significant when it was purchased by a large 30,000-farm Dutch cooperative CRV Delta in 2003 to become CRV Ambreed. . .

 

BioGro New Zealand Names New CEO:

BioGro New Zealand is pleased to announce that Donald Nordeng has been appointed the new Chief Executive of BioGro.

He will be taking over the role from Dr Michelle Glogau who stepped down in early September.

Donald is an accomplished director with extensive experience in leading, building and growing companies in the organic certification industry.

Donald is well-recognised in the international organics sector and will bring global networks and perspectives to his new position. . .

 


Hard Country A Golden Bay Life

December 17, 2014

hard

Robin and Garry Robilliard had big dreams of owning their own farm but only a very small budget with which to purchase one.

Knowing better properties closer to town were out of their reach they settled for Rocklands, a rundown property on very marginal hill country over the Takaka Hill from Nelson.

Not only the farm was rundown, the house was too, allowing too easy access for mice and rats.

The three previous owners went broke trying to farm the property and given the challenges they faced the Robilliards could easily have done so too.

But they were determined to keep hold of their dream and their farm and they persevered where many others would not have.

Farming this hard country required demanding physical work and mental toughness.

Robin recounts the their trials and triumphs without self-pity and with a sense of humour, painting a vivid picture of their life  and times and the people who played a part in them.

Farming and raising their children would have been enough for most women but Robin also managed to write entertaining accounts of their life for the Auckland Weekly and was a guest on the TV programme Beauty and the Beast.

This led to opportunities for travel writing and accounts of her travels behind the iron curtain are included in the book.

Hard Country is an interesting and  inspirational read which will appeal to a wide audience, not just those with a connection to farming.

That said, if you have a farmer in want of a Christmas present, this book would make a good one.

Hard Country A Golden Bay Life by Robin Robilliard is published by Random House.


GDT up 2.4%

December 17, 2014

At last a lift in the GlobalDairyTrade index – up 2.4% in this morning’s auction.

 

gdt17914

gdt17.12.14

The next auction will be held on January 6th.


Still focussed on surplus

December 17, 2014

The Government believes an OBEGAL surplus is achievable this financial year, despite Treasury’s latest forecast predicting a $572 million deficit (0.2 per cent of GDP) for the year to 30 June 2015, Finance Minister Bill English says.

“These forecasts emphasise the unusual conditions the New Zealand economy is experiencing,” Mr English says. “Treasury is predicting solid growth, growing employment and low interest rates, which help New Zealanders to get ahead. But at the same time, falling dairy prices and low inflation are restricting growth in the nominal economy and government revenue.

“This is making it more challenging for the Government to achieve surplus in 2014/15. However we remain on track to reduce debt to 20 per cent of GDP by 2020.

“Although this latest Treasury forecast predicts a small deficit for the current year, we believe the strong underlying economy and responsible fiscal management can deliver a surplus when the final government accounts are published next October,” Mr English says.

Whether we return to surplus this year or next, the government’s careful management has turned the economy around in the face of financial and natural disasters and has protected the most vulnerable people while doing it.

Previous forecasting rounds show the outlook can change significantly between the Half Year Update and the final accounts being published. As recently as 2012/13, the final OBEGAL deficit was $2.9 billion smaller than the previous HYEFU forecast.

“The Government has a track record of sticking to our spending plans to protect the most vulnerable and to provide certainty for users of public services. We won’t be changing that approach,” Mr English says.

“Despite the lower than expected revenue forecasts, the Government’s ongoing commitment to spending restraint means the public finances continue to improve significantly each year.”

The OBEGAL deficit has shrunk significantly from a peak of 9 per cent of GDP in 2010/11. Net core Crown debt is expected to peak in the current fiscal year at 26.5 per cent of GDP and then reduce to 19.1 per cent of GDP in 2020/21. A residual cash surplus is now expected in 2017/18, a year earlier than forecast previously, which is also when the Government intends to start repaying debt in dollar terms. 

The Budget Policy Statement released today confirms that allowances for Budget 2015 and Budget 2016 have each been reduced to $1 billion. The allowance has been re-phased over three years to provide a $2.5 billion allowance in Budget 2017.

“This will allow us to consider modest tax cuts and/or additional debt repayment in Budget 2017, as economic and fiscal conditions allow,” Mr English says.

Treasury’s forecasts suggest that New Zealand’s economic growth potential before inflation sets in – essentially the speed limit of the economy – is higher than estimated previously.

New Zealand recorded 3.9 per cent economic growth over the year to June, which was one of the higher rates among developed countries. Other positive economic indicators include:

  • GDP growth is expected to average almost 3 per cent over the next five years, better than the Euro area, the US, the UK, Japan and Canada.
  • Interest rates are staying lower for longer, with mortgage interest rates still just above 50-year lows.
  • Household disposable income is increasing faster than inflation – rising 9 per cent in real terms in the last four years. It is forecast to increase by another 9 per cent over the next four years.
  • Recent job growth is expected to continue. There are 72,000 more people employed now than there were a year ago. An additional 153,000 people are forecast to be in work by mid-2019.
  • The average full-time wage is expected to rise by $8,000 to around $64,000 by mid-2019.
  • Unemployment, currently at 5.4 per cent, is forecast to fall to 4.5 per cent by 2018. 

“Achieving those goals is possible only with a continuation of the sustained economic growth this Government’s careful economic management is helping to deliver,” Mr English says.

Most other countries would envy us these indicators.

National remains focused on returning to surplus, growing our economy, and supporting more jobs. ntnl.org.nz/137TT21


December 17 in history

December 17, 2014

497 BC – The first Saturnalia festival was celebrated in ancient Rome.

546 – Siege of Rome: The Ostrogoths under king Totila plundered the city, by bribing the Byzantine garrison.

942 Assassination of William I of Normandy.

1398 – Sultan Nasir-u Din Mehmud‘s armies in Delhi were defeated by Timur.

1531 – Pope Clement VII established a parallel body to the Inquisition in Lisbon, Portugal.

1538  Pope Paul III excommunicated Henry VIII.

1577  Francis Drake set sail from Plymouth on a secret mission to explore the Pacific Coast of the Americas for Queen Elizabeth I.

1583 – Cologne War: Forces under Ernest of Bavaria defeated the troops under Gebhard Truchsess von Waldburg at the Siege of Godesberg.

1586 – Emperor Go-Yozei became Emperor of Japan.

1600 – Marriage of Henry IV of France and Marie de’ Medici.

1637 – Shimabara Rebellion: Japanese peasants led by Amakusa Shiro rose against daimyo Matsukura Shigeharu.

1773 At Wharehunga Bay, Queen Charlotte Sound, 10 men who were with James Cook’s navigator Tobias Furneaux died at the hands of Ngati Kuia and Rangitane, led by their chief, Kahura.

Ten crew of Cook's ship <em> Adventure </em>  killed and eaten

1819  Simón Bolívar declared the independence of the Republic of Gran Colombia in Angostura (now Ciudad Bolívar in Venezuela).

1834 The Dublin and Kingstown Railway, the first public railway in Ireland opened.

1853 – Pierre Paul Émile Roux, French physician, co-founded the Pasteur Institute (d. 1933)

1865 First performance of the Unfinished Symphony by Franz Schubert.

1889 New Zealand’s Eifel tower opened at the South Seas Exhibition.

New Zealand’s own Eiffel Tower opens

1904 Paul Cadmus, American artist, was born (d. 1999).

1915 André Claveau, French singer, was born (d. 2003).

1918 Culmination of the Darwin Rebellion as some 1000 demonstrators march on Government House in Darwin.

1935 First flight of the Douglas DC-3 airplane.

1936  Tommy Steele, English singer and actor, was born.
1937 Kerry Packer, Australian businessman, was born (d. 2005).
1938  Peter Snell, New Zealand runner, was born.
Peter Snell and Murray Halberg win Olympic gold
1939  Battle of the River Plate – The Admiral Graf Spee was scuttled by Captain Hans Langsdorff outside Montevideo.

Graf Spee at Spithead.jpg

1944 Major Major, No. 1 Dog, 2NZEF, and member/mascot of 19 Battalion since 1939, died of sickness in Italy. He was buried with full military honours at Rimini.

Major Major, mascot of 19 Battalion, dies of sickness

1947  First flight of the Boeing B-47 Stratojet strategic bomber.

1961 Sara Dallin, English singer (Bananarama), was born.

1967  Prime Minister of Australia Harold Holt disappeared while swimming near Portsea, Victoria and was presumed drowned.

1969 The SALT I (Strategic Arms Limitation Talks) began.

1969  Project Blue Book: The United States Air Force closed its study of UFOs, stating that sightings were generated as a result of “A mild form of mass hysteria, Individuals who fabricate such reports to perpetrate a hoax or seek publicity, psychopathological persons, and misidentification of various conventional objects.”

1983 The IRA bombed Harrods Department Store killing six people.

1989 Pilot episode of The Simpsons aired in the United States.

2003  SpaceShipOne flight 11P, piloted by Brian Binnie, made its first supersonic flight.

2005 – Jigme Singye Wangchuck abdicated the throne as King of Bhutan.

2009 – MV Danny F II sank off the coast of Lebanon, resulting in the deaths of 44 people and over 28,000 animals.

2010 – Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire. This act became the catalyst for the Tunisian Revolution and the wider Arab Spring.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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