Rural round-up

Little water left for new schemes -David Bruce:

Virtually no water will be available from the lower Waitaki River for new irrigation schemes, if Environment Canterbury changes a water allocation plan for the river.

That possibility is revealed in a report on ”plan change 3” for the Waitaki catchment water allocation regional plan. Environment Canterbury (Ecan) earlier this year called for public submissions on the plan change, receiving 549. It is now in the second round of submissions.

As part of the plan change, a report under section 32 of the Resource Management Act, that contains details of what the change contains and the effects, has had to be prepared. . .

Westland Milk records highest-ever one-day milk collection – Fiona Rotherham:

 (BusinessDesk) – Westland Milk Products, the country’s second largest dairy cooperative, has recorded its highest ever one-day collection, with its tankers bringing in slightly more than four million litres of milk on Oct.31.

The Hokitika-based cooperative’s farmer shareholders have lifted production by more than 5 percent this season in spite of wet and cold weather on West Coast with 335 million litres of milk sent so far to the company’s plants in Hokitika and Rolleston, Westland said in a statement. Coast-based farmer suppliers have produced a 3 percent rise on this time last year while Canterbury shareholders are up by more than 14 percent. . .

 

Putting in 100% pays off with win – Sally Rae:

Reward for effort.

That is a common saying in the Engelbrecht household in East Otago, applied to anything from farming to the sports field.

”That sums up everything in life,” Simon Engelbrecht told those attending a field day at his farm last week.

Mr Engelbrecht, who farms at Stoneburn, near Palmerston, with his wife Kirstin, was a firm believer in ”do it 100% or don’t do it”.

The couple were the winners of this year’s New Zealand ewe hogget competition. First-time entrants in the competition, they won the crossbred section with their Coopdale hoggets and the flock performance award, before winning the overall title. . .

Exporters paying lower tariffs:

A report into trade barriers for New Zealand’s horticulture industry reveals the amount exporters have had to pay on tariffs was 25 percent less than two years ago.

The Trade Barriers report shows tariffs imposed by other countries cost New Zealand growers on average $36,000 each – about $8000 less than in 2012.

Sixty percent of New Zealand’s total production of fruit and vegetables is exported and is worth just over $2.4 billion.

Horticulture New Zealand chief executive Peter Silcock said it is important to continue efforts on getting free trade agreements because while progress has been made there is still a long way to go. . .

Non-tariff barriers next hurdle – Nigel Stirling:

A shift in New Zealand’s trade strategy looks to be underway as primary industry bosses question the value in launching yet more tariff-tackling negotiations when potentially larger obstacles to trade exist elsewhere.

The recent deal with South Korea meant NZ now had trade agreements with six of its top 10 export markets.

Of the remaining four (the United States, Japan, the European Union and India) negotiations were under way for tariffs-busting deals either through the 12-country TransPacific Partnership or in bilateral talks either underway or expected soon. . .

Study of kea strike starts – Sally Rae:

Clio Reid wants to help prevent sheep being attacked by kea – and kea being shot.

Ms Reid is seeking help from farmers in a study of sheep and kea that she is conducting as part of her PhD through the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences at Massey University.

They were encouraged to take part in a survey to find out the extent of kea strike on South Island high country sheep stations.

Kea strike was discovered in the Wakatipu area in the 1860s, with a legal government bounty initiated in the same decade which resulted in an estimated 150,000 kea killed up until the early 1970s. . .

Farm Environment Trust Celebrates ‘Great Farming Stories’:

 Many of the great farming stories delivered by the Ballance Farm Environment Awards are showcased on New Zealand Farm Environment (NZFE) Trust’s website.

NZFE chairman Simon Saunders says the Trust recently revamped its website to make the “vast wealth of educational material and fantastic farming stories” easily accessible to farmers and the wider community.

The ‘Great Farming Stories’ link on NZFE’s homepage www.nzfeatrust.org.nz will take the viewer through to an extensive choice of ‘Sustainability in Action’ video presentations and written reports. . .

 

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