Word of the day

December 6, 2014

Acyrology – incorrect use of language or words, especially the use of malapropisms.


Rural round-up

December 6, 2014

Alliance hires former Fletcher exec Surveyor as new CEO – Paul McBeth:

(BusinessDesk) – Alliance Group, the world’s largest processor and exporter of sheepmeat, has hired former Fletcher Building executive David Surveyor to head up the meat processor from next year.

The Invercargill-based, farmer owned cooperative today said Surveyor will join the company as chief executive from January, replacing Grant Cuff, who said in July he was stepping down. Surveyor is currently executive general manager of Fletcher subsidiary Laminex, having previously worked for BHP and Bluescope Steel.

“It is a privilege to be leading the business into its next phase,” Surveyor said in a statement. “I aim to build on what has already been achieved to further improve the Alliance Group’s performance and returns to the company’s shareholder suppliers.” . . .

Beef + Lamb New Zealand director nominations called for:

North Canterbury farmer Andy Fox is not seeking re-election to the board of Beef + Lamb New Zealand and will stand down at next year’s annual meeting in March.

Fox has represented sheep and beef farmers for three terms – a total of nine years. He was first elected to the board of Meat & Wool New Zealand and then to its successor, Beef + Lamb New Zealand.

Fox said he had been proud to represent sheep and beef farmers and his biggest satisfaction was seeing more levy-funded activity focused behind-the-farm-gate. Advances in animal genetics through farmer investment via Beef + Lamb New Zealand were especially good. . .

Forest Firefighting Expert for International Safety Conference

The Forest Industry Engineering Association (FIEA) is pleased to announce US Forest Service forest firefighting expert Ivan Pupulidy has been confirmed as a keynote speaker for its flagship forest safety conference series in March 2015. The summit will be at Rotorua’s Distinction Hotel on 3-4th March and the Bayview Eden Hotel in Melbourne on 10-11th March.

“Ivan’s expertise in fire-fighting behaviours and root cause analysis is well-respected internationally. So we’re sure he will be well-received at our 2015 Safety Summit conferences,” says FIEA’s forestry spokesman John Stulen. . .

Rural Women New Zealand Calls for Keep Left Road Markings on All Roads to reduce Tourist Crashes

Rural Women New Zealand is calling for arrows to be painted on the left-hand side of roads leaving tourist venues, and at regular intervals on all roads, in an attempt to reduce the number of accidents involving tourists.

“The danger posed by tourists particularly on rural roads was a hot topic at our recent national conference,” says Rural Women NZ national president, Wendy McGowan.

Last year 558 crashes resulting in death or injury involved foreign drivers. In three-quarters of the cases the visitors were shown to be at fault, with many of the accidents caused by drivers being on the wrong side of the road. . .

Paua Industry Calls for Delay in Shark Cage Dive Operations:

The paua industry is calling for a moratorium on great white shark cage dive operations in order to avoid risks to paua divers and local communities.

The Department of Conservation is currently considering applications for permits for great white shark cage dive operations in the waters around Stewart Island.

Storm Stanley, Chairman of the industry representative group PauaMAC5, said that a one year moratorium would allow time for the Department to properly assess the impacts of shark cage diving on the fully protected great white shark population. . .

 


Saturday’s smiles

December 6, 2014

A blonde, brunette, and red head, all very fit woman, were crossing a lake in a breast stroke swimming race.

The brunette finished first and was followed shortly after by the red head.

The race organisers realised the blonde was struggling and sent a couple of life guards in to rescue her.

When she was safely aboard their boat, the life guards asked why she had such a difficult time crossing the lake.

The blonde looked uncomfortable, and lowered her eyes as she replied “I don’t like to tell tales, but the other two woman used their arms.”


Counting down to Christmas

December 6, 2014

It used to take years to get from one Christmas to another.

I don’t think it’s even been weeks since the last one.

But here we are counting down to this one with the first candle of advent having been lit.

 

advent

The credit for the wreath goes to Jonell’s Florist in Oamaru who make me one each year.

Everyone has been different, all have been beautiful.


Saturday soapbox

December 6, 2014

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse but not to abuse.

One of the most sincere forms of respect is really listening to what someone says.


December 6 in history

December 6, 2014

1060 – Béla I of Hungary was crowned king of Hungary.

1240 – Mongol invasion of Rus: Kiev under Danylo of Halych and Voivode Dmytro fell to the Mongols under Batu Khan.

1534 The city of Quito in Ecuador was founded by Spanish settlers led by Sebastián de Belalcázar.

1648 Colonel Pride of the New Model Army purged the Long Parliament of MPs sympathetic to King Charles I  in order for the King’s trial to go ahead; –  “Pride’s Purge“.

1704 – Battle of Chamkaur.

1721 – James Elphinston, Scottish philologist and educator, was born (d. 1809).

1745 – Charles Edward Stewart’s army began retreat during the second Jacobite Rising.

1768 The first edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica was published.

1792 – William II of the Netherlands was born (d. 1849).

1849 American abolitionist Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery.

1865 – The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, banning slavery.

1872 – Arthur Henry Adams, Australian journalist and author, was born (d. 1936).

1877  The first edition of the Washington Post was published.

1877 – Thomas Edison created the first recording of a human voice, reciting “Mary Had a Little Lamb”.

1884 The Washington Monument in Washington D.C. was completed.

1896 – Ira Gershwin, American songwriter, was born (d. 1983).

1897  London became the world’s first city to host licenced taxicabs.

1900  Agnes Moorehead, American actress, was born (d. 1974).

1907 –  A coal mine explosion at Monongah, West Virginia killed 362 workers.

1917 Finland declared independence from Russia.

1917  Halifax Explosion: A munitions explosion killed more than 1900 people and destroyed part of the City of Halifax.

1921 The Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed in London by British and Irish representatives.

1922 The Irish Free State came into existence

1933 U.S. federal judge John M. Woolsey ruled that the James Joyce‘s novel Ulysses was not obscene.

1935 New Zealand’s first Labour government took office with Michael Joseph Savage as Prime Minister.

First Labour government takes office

1947 The Everglades National Park in Florida was dedicated.

1952  – Charles Bronson, English criminal, was born.

1956 – Aged 14, swimmer Sandra Morgan became the youngest Australian to win an Olympic gold medal.

1957 –  A launchpad explosion of Vanguard TV3 thwarted the first United States’ attempt to launch a satellite into Earth orbit.

1965 – Pakistan’s Islamic Ideology Advisory Committee recommended that Islamic Studies be made a compulsory subject for Muslim students from primary to graduate level.

1967 – Adrian Kantrowitz performed the first human heart transplant in the United States.

1975 – Balcombe Street Siege: An IRA Active Service Unit took a couple hostage in Balcombe Street, London.

1977 – South Africa granted independence to Bophuthatswana, although it was not recognized by any other country.

1978 – Spain approved its latest constitution in a referendum.

1982 – Droppin Well bombing: The Irish National Liberation Army detonated a bomb in Ballykelly, killing eleven British soldiers and six civilians.

1988 – The Australian Capital Territory was granted self-government.

1989 The École Polytechnique Massacre (or Montreal Massacre): an anti-feminist gunman murdered 14 young women at the École Polytechnique in Montreal.

1992 – Extremist Hindu activists demolished Babri Masjid – a 16th century mosque in Ayodhya, India which had been used as a temple since 1949.

1997 – A Russian Antonov An-124 cargo plane crashed into an apartment complex near Irkutsk, Siberia, killing 67.

1998 – Hugo Chávez Frías, Venezuelan military officer and politician, was elected President of Venezuela.

2005 – Several villagers were shot dead during protests in Dongzhou, China.

2006 – NASA revealed photographs taken by Mars Global Surveyor suggesting the presence of liquid water on Mars.

2008 – The 2008 Greek riots broke out upon the murder of a 15-year-old boy, Alexandros Grigoropoulos.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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