Word of the day

September 18, 2014

Transpicuous – transparent; easily understood; clearly seen through; lucid.


Security agencies foil terror attack

September 18, 2014

Australian police have arrested suspected terrorists in Sydney and Brisbane:

A SERIES of anti-terrorism raids were sparked by intelligence reports that Islamic State supporters were planning a public execution in Australia, Prime Minister Tony Abbott says.

Details of the planned attack have emerged in the wake of the biggest anti-terrorism operation in Australia’s history, involving hundreds of police officers in co-ordinated raids across Sydney and Brisbane this morning.

Mr Abbott was briefed on the police raid on Wednesday night, which included intelligence that public beheadings were planned. “The exhortations, quite direct exhortations, were coming from an Australian who is apparently quite senior in ISIL to networks of support back in Australia to conduct demonstration killings here in this country,” he told reporters.

“So this is not just suspicion, this is intent and that’s why the police and security agencies decided to act in the way they have.”

LIVE UPDATES: Terror raids

NSW Police will allege that some of the Sydney men arrested in the operation had communicated with the Islamic State organisation while developing their alleged plan to seize a random member of the public and behead them live on camera. . . .

Some comments on the raids:

    1:41pm: Labor leader Bill Shorten is holding a press conference about the terror raids.

“The raids will no doubt come as a shock to many Australians.”

“It does remind us that the threat of terror can actually occur on our shores.”

“The reports of what these people were allegedly preparing are truly shocking.”

“Australians should be reassured by the capabilities of our security agencies. People should be reassured that our [agencies] are able to do their job before bad things happen to people.”

He said four major terrorist attacks planned on Australian soil had been disrupted since 2003 with the participants convicted and jailed. . .

 

12:44pm: NSW Premier Mike Baird said the alleged plot, to behead a person on the streets of Sydney, was “undoubtedly horrifying”.

“But I want to pay absolute … thanks to the authorities that have done their job,” he said.

“We want to say to the community: be assured, the actions [today] show that every single effort will be made to ensure that we are safe.”

12:42pm: NSW Premier Mike Baird is holding a press conference about the anti-terrorism raids.

He warned those who wanted to harm the community that “we will hunt you down”.

“To those that think they may be operating in dark corners, we are shining the light upon you,” he said.

 

This puts into perspective what Prime Minister John Key said last night:

New Zealanders face real threats and as Prime Minister of New Zealand I can either choose to walk away from protecting New Zealanders or do my job. I will never walk away from protecting New Zealanders.

If we ever lived in a benign strategic environment we don’t now and that is why security agencies must have the powers they need to protect us.

 


Just in case you were wondering . . .

September 18, 2014

"Only


Thursday’s quiz

September 18, 2014

1. Who said:  “The people who cast the votes don’t decide an election, the people who count the votes do.” ?

2.  Who was the woman who led the campaign for women’s suffrage in New Zealand?

3. It’s élire in French;  eleggere in Italian; elegir in Spanish and whiriwhiri in Maori, what is it in English?

4. Who was the first Maori to win a general electorate?

5. If you could choose anyone – living or not – as Prime Minister now who would it be?


Rural round-up

September 18, 2014

The most boring bankrupt economic argument–“we export raw logs when we could be adding value and making jobs” : Eye to the Long Run:

The rot set in in the late 1940s on this. Jim Anderton was maybe the first in the modern era to believe we wantonly refused to profit from the blindingly obvious money and jobs to be had from processing timber.

In recent times only Winston Peters has been bright enough to see what the entire business sector has apparently completely missed.

Now, joining him as a value add timber processing expert we have the lawyer from Herne Bay – Mr Cunliffe who has spotted the opportunity.

It is, you understand, not so profitable that any of them would give up their day job… it never is, is it? . . .

Future of red meat promotion under threat – Allan Barber:

Next year’s Commodity Levy Act referendum is one of the factors concentrating meat industry minds on the question of red meat promotional investment. B+LNZ is currently conducting a consultation round with individual meat companies to find out how this critically important, if contentious, topic should be agreed for the benefit of all industry participants.

B+LNZ Chief Executive Scott Champion told me it’s too early to make any predictions about the outcome, at least until after completion of the consultation round at the end of September. With the referendum about 12 months away, the process is geared to providing time to gather enough detail for promotional strategy development before taking this out to farmers to test it in advance of the vote. . . 

New Zealand’s Hake and Ling Join Top 8% of World’s Sustainable Fisheries:

Hake and ling from New Zealand are now among the top 8% of global sustainable fish species after being recognised by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC).

Each of the three New Zealand hake trawl fisheries, five ling trawl fisheries and five ling long line fisheries have been certified as sustainable against the MSC standard – the ‘gold standard’ for sustainable seafood production.

Only 8% of the world’s wild-capture harvest is certified through the global MSC programme which sets high internationally-accepted standards for sustainable fishing and provides consumers with assurance that MSC certified seafood is sustainable, based on sound, independent science. . .

 

Rural New Zealand wants gigabit equality:

Federated Farmers and TUANZ believe it is essential the next Government delivers better connectivity to rural New Zealand, and is keen to work with them to make that happen.

“We are encouraged by the National Party’s further commitment of $150million, if they’re re-elected, and hope to see a similar commitment from our next Government announced this Saturday” says Anders Crofoot, Federated Farmers Telecommunications Spokesperson.

“Federated Farmers and TUANZ support a Gigabit Agenda for Rural New Zealand that doesn’t leave our productive sector behind. We need to talk about gigabit speeds, where farmers can eventually get their gigabytes as fast as the townies do. . . .

 The right people trained the right way –  Craig Littin:

Our recently released Manifesto talks about building a sustainable farm system giving us the collective means to go forward as a nation.  We can and we will be more than we are today, but to do that we need the right people trained the right way.

Firstly we need to look at what we are trying to achieve. We need to have the young people of New Zealand believing that farming is the attractive career option that it is. We also need to put our money where our mouth is in terms of investing in education, science, research and innovation.

There are some great stories out there of the highly skilled people in our industry who have worked through the agricultural industry to now run multimillion dollar businesses, on very attractive salaries. These opportunities are available to anyone with the enthusiasm, intellect and discipline required to make it in the dairy industry, but we need sound education systems to get the right people into the industry. To do this we need to align the requirements and standards to fulfil job roles with the qualifications offered within primary industry training/education institutes. . . .

Molkerei Ammerland Completes First Sweet Whey Powder Auction on Globaldairytrade:

Sweet whey powder has been sold for the first time on GlobalDairyTrade (GDT), the world’s leading online dairy auction platform, with Molkerei Ammerland selling the product they offered at their first trading event.

Molkerei Ammerland CEO Ralf Hinrichs said the company was pleased with the results from the first SWP online auction.

“Through GDT we have been able to extend our reach to a larger number of customers, and to transact with them much faster. We’re looking forward to using GDT to grow our export market,” he said. . .

Tasman Tanks Appoints Craig Hemmings as Dairy Effluent Sector Manager:

Leading New Zealand and Australian storage tank company Tasman Tanks, has appointed Craig Hemmings as dairy effluent sector manager.

Mr Hemmings brings to his position more than a decade of management experience with nationally and internationally recognised agricultural companies.

As dairy effluent sector manager for Tasman Tanks, Mr Hemmings will oversee the operational management of the company’s dairy effluent division in New Zealand.

“From small beginnings in 1996, Tasman Tanks has built its reputation on designing, manufacturing and installing fully engineered and certified tanks,” said Mr Hemmings. . .

 Central Otago Wine Industry no longer a “One Trick Pony”:

As we have come to expect, Central Otago wines dominated the medals for pinot noir at the 2014 New Zealand International Wine Show, taking out 10 of the 15 Gold Medals awarded. But what is more interesting about the results of this show is that Central Otago wines won medals in a total of 10 different wine categories – Methode Traditionelle, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Gewürztraminer, Chardonnay, Dessert Wine, Rose, Pinot Noir, and Syrah.

Now in its tenth year, The New Zealand International Wine Show is firmly established as the largest wine competition held in New Zealand each year. The 2014 New Zealand International Wine Show was judged from 8th to 10th September in Auckland and attracted a total of 2130 entries. Trophies will be awarded at the Awards Dinner on 27 September. . .


Why we need 90 day trial

September 18, 2014

This example of an unscrupulous worker highlights why we need 90 day trial periods:

Federated Farmers believes the experience of a husband and wife farming team in Taranaki underscores why the 90-days provision is so important to small businesses.

“Yesterday a member called 0800 FARMING to alert us to a guy doing the rounds in Taranaki who may be gaming employment laws,” says Andrew Hoggard, Federated Farmers Employment spokesperson.

“He appeared to be a keen farmworker but became insistent that all he needed to start was a handshake. This guy even told the couple concerned that he could see they were under pressure so even offered to pitch his tent.

“They did exactly the right thing by getting him to sign Federated Farmers’ industry standard employment contract before starting. That’s where the bush lawyer emerged as he tried to get clauses modified.

“Lucky for them they stuck to their guns and to Federated Farmers agreement and advice. As it turns it wasn’t a long employment relationship lasting a mere 4.5 days.

“On the very first day there was a major argument over helmet use where he refused to wear one. He turned up to work another day wearing a balaclava asking if, “it intimidated them.”

“Along with a generally unhelpful demeanour it appeared to our member that he was trying to bait them into a summary dismissal.

“They called Federated Farmers 0800 327 646 advice line and followed that advice to the letter dismissing the person under the 90-days provision. His parting shot was “it’s going to cost you.”

“It shouldn’t because they stuck to the law and to Federated Farmers’ advice and contract. No matter how small or short term the role is, never “shake on it” or allow a person to start work before they have signed their employment contract.

“What concerns us is that there are bush lawyers out there who could be looking to game employment laws in order to secure a settlement from unwitting farm employers. Our member wanted this publicised to prevent other farmers from being caught out.

“It is why the 90-days provision is so important and why it would become a feeding frenzy for such people if it were to be axed.

“The 90-days provision is a crucial protection for employers to prevent them from being stuck with unscrupulous workers. Our member told us their last employee only left after four years in order to go sharemilking.

“They were fine because they had systems in place backed up by Federated Farmers’ employment contracts and member advice. If you haven’t got your systems together you seriously risk an employment law shellacking,” Mr Hoggard warned.

Labour and the unions always promote the worker as the weaker one in the employer-employee relationship.

But it is very difficult to get rid of a worker who isn’t working out and it’s not just the business that suffers as a result of that, it’s other staff when the dud worker poisons the workplace.

 


Craig’s press secretary leaves in tears

September 18, 2014

Conservative leader Colin Craig has just lost his press secretary of two years:

Rachel MacGregor has told Newstalk ZB she’s left the party as of this morning.

Our political editor Barry Soper says she is very upset and has taken public relations advice.

“Colin Craig does campaign on being this wholesome, out there sort of a bloke, that’s all encompassing, that really is the sort of person we should be looking up to.

“Now if he can’t get his own house in order in terms of staff in the Conservative Party then you’ve got to ask questions.”

Barry Soper says this will damage the Conservative Party brand.

Soper just told Leighton Smith he’d talked to her and she was in tears.

Whatever the truth of this is, it will do the party no good.

It is on 4% in Colin James’ poll of polls.

If  it doesn’t make the 5% threshold those votes will be distributed to parties which do.

A friend was talking to a woman about this yesterday. When she realised her vote for the Conservatives might end up helping Labour and the Green Party get an extra MP she was horrified.


Nats aim for 25% reduction in beneficiaries

September 18, 2014

A re-elected National Government will reduce the number of people on welfare by 25 per cent, with a series of new initiatives to support beneficiaries into work.

“We’re making a difference with stronger expectations and greater support. The plan we’ve set out today allows us to take the next steps to get more New Zealanders off welfare and into work,” says National Party Social Development spokesperson Paula Bennett.

“National is focused on building a stronger economy and creating opportunities for more jobs and higher wages. Jobseekers are in the best position in years to take advantage of New Zealand’s economic growth. We’ll be supporting them with our investment approach and targeting more resources earlier to those who need the most help.

“We will reduce the total number of people receiving a benefit by 75,000 by 2017, including reducing the total number of young people aged between 16 and 24 on benefit by 40 per cent, or around 21,000 people.

“Our aim is to bring benefit numbers down from 295,000 to 220,000 people over the next three years.

“These are ambitious targets, but they are realistic and achievable. Since December 2010, nearly 60,000 people have come off welfare, and over the past two years 30,000 children have gone from living in a benefit-dependent home to a working one.”

Our plan includes:

Offering incentive payments for beneficiaries who stay in work for a set period of time.

Offering more childcare support by expanding our Flexible Childcare pilot.

Making first-time Work and Income assessments more comprehensive so people are directed to the right sort of support from the very start. 

“Our target of a 40 per cent reduction of young people on benefit is a bold one, but 53,000 young people aged between 16 and 24 on welfare is too many for a country with prospects like ours,” says Mrs Bennett.

“We have already announced the expansion of our Youth Service to all teen parents and many 18 and 19 years olds. We’re going to put a similar focus on young people aged between 20 and 24 with a series of new measures, so they get the same level of attention as younger beneficiaries.”  

New initiatives for young people include:

Exploring a trial where iwi administer welfare payments to young people, similar to the Youth Service.

Helping young people get driver’s licences.

Expanding the successful $3k to Christchurch scheme to other regions needing energetic and motivated workers.

Investigating a regional Work Skills scheme to get young people on benefit working in the community.

“We’ve already seen welfare numbers dropping by the thousands, and it’s important to keep our foot on the pedal,” says Mrs Bennett.

“We have a comprehensive and ambitious plan for New Zealanders on welfare who, with the right support from a re-elected National Government, can get into meaningful work that helps them and their families get ahead,” she says.

 The welfare policy is here.

One of the stark differences between National and the parties on the left is the determination to help those who can work to do so.

The facts are irrefutable – getting people from welfare to work is the best way out of poverty.

Reducing welfare dependency pays both social and economic dividends for the people involved and the country.

 


Don’t second guess polls

September 18, 2014

If you don’t want a National-led government you can vote for any party.

If you do want a National-led government then you must give your party vote to National.

Thanks for tuning in. MMP elections are always close. Only your Party Vote for National will keep the team that’s #Working4NZ. #Vote2014NZ

A man I phoned last night said he’d always been going to give Jacqui Dean his electorate vote but had been considering giving one of the wee parties his party vote. However, the closeness of the polls has convinced he can’t afford to do that if he wants a National-led government so he’s going to give two blue ticks.

He’s right. It’s the party vote that counts.

Give yours to National to provide it with the strongest possible position for post-election negotiations with potential partners.


NZIER: water taxes will suck Otago & Canterbury dry

September 18, 2014

Water taxes could become a regional tax on Canterbury and Otago, seriously impacting those regional economies.

This is the conclusion of a New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) report for Federated Farmers.

Care needs  to  be  taken  when  considering  taxing  competitive  agricultural  sectors since  countries  which  have  done  so  without  strong  justification  have  performed poorly (e.g. Argentina).

While there is little policy relevant data to tell us how much water is being used by the rural sector, preliminary estimates suggest that for every cent (per cubic metre of water) the rural sector is charged, $39 million will be taken out of rural communities.

This assumes  that  the  policy  is  enforceable  and  that  any  exceptions  could  be adequately  accommodated.1

Further, if  focused  on  irrigation  only,  the  tax  will predominantly fall on Canterbury and Otago  water users  (see following table), while traditional dairying areas such as Taranaki and Waikato will pay a minimal water tax.

While water  quality  is  reasonably  good,  maintaining  water  quality  is  a  major challenge that needs  to be overcome  with the  spotlight firmly on non-point  source agricultural run-off. Farmers need to be proactive in addressing this issue or others (e.g.  over-zealous  regulators, foreign consumers)  will do so  instead, possibly in ways that are less efficient for farmers and the country than an industry-driven initiative.

Doing nothing about water quality  is  not a sensible  option.  Neither is rushing ahead without sufficient information.  

But this is not a new problem. New Zealand can learn from other countries’ water quality regulatory experiences here and hopefully avoid making their mistakes. Some key lessons are:

  •  Addressing water quality that impacts on agriculture is a long term game. Rash decisions made now could have significant and costly unintended consequences
  •  Use science to determine minimum flows to sustain healthy water ways, and be flexible and adaptive in the management of the environment as scientific knowledge improves
  •  Using markets to allocate water between competing uses can be efficient and effective when conditions allow, but be aware that market forces alone will not solve all problems
  •  Water taxes will not be an effective allocation mechanism if significant physical, regulatory or information barriers exist. Specifically, further work is required in understanding the detailed water use trade-offs since we lack the necessary policy-relevant information, data and institutional capability
  •  Where possible, including urban areas within the same water allocation and trading framework will improve efficiency. . . .

It compares the policies of the National, Labour and Green parties and says:

There certainly  needs  to  be  a  step  up  in  primary  sector  –  and  other  sectors’  – responsiveness to this issue. But durable, effective water  trading  solutions take time to develop and must be based on robust analysis and facts, not rhetoric and ideology.

Voters should  be  wary  about  promised  policy  outcomes  when  the  evidence  base around  the  economic,  environmental,  social  and  cultural  impacts  of  the  proposed policies is far from complete. . .

There are no credible arguments against the importance of good water quality, the need to prevent degradation of water ways and clean up the dirty ones.

But imposing a water tax on Canterbury and Otago farmers to address problems all over the country, some of which have nothing to do with irrigation or farming, is not the answer to poor water quality in some areas and will create other problems.

It will also impose huge costs on a relatively small number of farmers in two regions:

“Let’s not kid ourselves that the road Labour and the Greens are travelling down with Water Taxes, looks more like regional farming taxes to us,” says Ian Mackenzie, Federated Farmers Environment spokesperson.

“The NZIER have calculated that a water tax of one cent on every cubic metre (m3) of water used for irrigated and stock purposes, means $39 million would need to be paid by farmers. 

“While Labour and the Green Party won’t confirm what they are considering, in 2011, the Greens campaigned on ten cents a cubic metre.

“If that happened then Canterbury’s farmers would foot 62 percent of the cost ($248 million) while 21 percent of the cost would fall on Otago’s farmers ($82 million).  Those two regions being where most of New Zealand’s irrigation happens.

“This represents something like a 13 percent bite out of agricultural GDP in Canterbury and 12.5 percent out of Otago’s agricultural GDP.  That’s one heck of a wallop and for what?

“These taxes have little to do with the political rhetoric of tackling water quality. There are plenty of regions with little or no irrigation, which have water quality challenges due to agriculture, industry and municipal influences.  

“It seems more about revenue generation to plug big spending promises and farmers, horticulturalists and vintners in Otago and Canterbury are being lined up to foot the bill.

“There’s no mention that these same businesses already pay thousands of dollars each year in ‘taxes’ to regional and district councils for the privilege  of accessing water.

“It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to work out that water taxes will only drive up the cost of food production, especially locally grown fresh vegetables and fruit.

“Are Kiwis really prepared to gift our domestic food market to other countries by pricing ourselves off the market?

“Labour and the Greens claim it will drive better and more efficient use of water. Well they are too late. Over the past ten years or so, farmers have been spending hundreds of millions of dollars upgrading on and off-farm irrigation infrastructure to more efficiently use water.

“This is plainly obvious for all to see in Canterbury with the proliferation of centre pivot irrigators.  With each one costing some $250,000, they allow the farmer to use substantially less water producing more food and fibre over traditional border dykes.

“There’s only so much money to go around for farmers to invest.  These proposed tastes will only slow down or stop a farmers’ ability to invest in new technologies.

“You’ve got to remember that we’re only using a fraction of New Zealand’s renewable freshwater resource, but the proper word is renewing.

“As the NZIER also notes, there are large informational, institutional and implementation gaps on water taxes. In our view, water tax proposals should have ‘use with caution’ in flashing red lights.

“If you want an example of a country with ill-founded and ill-thought out taxes that are like a wrecking ball through the primary industries then Argentina provides it.  Dr William Rolleston visited it earlier this year and saw for himself how everyone loses out there.

“By attacking Canterbury and Otago irrigators, there is such a dislocation between who you tax and the problem you want to solve, that the only thing you hurt is the economy.

“That’s why the media, politicians and commentators need to heed NZIER’s advice that, “care needs to be taken when considering taxing competitive agricultural sectors since countries which have done so without strong justification have performed poorly”.

“With some trading partners increasingly believing we are not responsibly harnessing our water resources to guarantee production, this is no place for policy experiments,” Mr Mackenzie finished by saying.

We don’t need an expensive experiment the direct costs of which will be carried by a relatively small number of farmers and the indirect costs of which will impact on Otago and Canterbury.

We need more of what’s already working.

This includes independently audited environmental plans for farms, which is what the North Otago Irrigation Company requires of all its water users.

Farmers already had lots of reasons to vote for another National-led government. This report provides them with more.


September 18 in history

September 18, 2014

96  Nerva was proclaimed Roman Emperor after Domitian was assassinated.

324 Constantine the Great decisively defeated Licinius in the Battle of Chrysopolis, establishing Constantine’s sole control over the Roman Empire.

1180  Philip Augustus became king of France.

1454  In the Battle of Chojnice, the Polish army was defeated by the Teutonic army during the Thirteen Years’ War.

1709 Samuel Johnson, English writer and lexicographer, was born (d. 1784).

1739  The Treaty of Belgrade was signed, ceding Belgrade to the Ottoman Empire.

1793  The first cornerstone of the Capitol building was laid by George Washington.

1809 The Royal Opera House in London opened.

1810  First Government Junta in Chile.

1812  The 1812 Fire of Moscow died down after destroying more than three quarters of the city. Napoleon returned from the Petrovsky Palace to the Moscow Kremlin, which was spared from the fire.

1837  Tiffany and Co. (first named Tiffany & Young) was founded by Charles Lewis Tiffany and Teddy Young in New York City.

1838 The Anti-Corn Law League was established by Richard Cobden.

1850  The U.S. Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850.

1851  First publication of The New-York Daily Times, which later became The New York Times.

1863  American Civil War: Battle of Chickamauga.

1870  Old Faithful Geyser was observed and named by Henry D. Washburn during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition to Yellowstone.

1872 King Oscar II acceded to the throne of Sweden-Norway.

1873  The Panic of 1873 began.

1876 James Scullin, 9th Prime Minister of Australia, was born (d. 1953).

1879 The Blackpool Illuminations were switched on for the first time.

1882 The Pacific Stock Exchange opened.

1885  Riots broke out in Montreal to protest against compulsory smallpox vaccination.

1889  Doris Blackburn, Australian politician, was born (d. 1970).

1895  Booker T. Washington delivered the “Atlanta Compromise” address.

1895  Daniel David Palmer gave the first chiropractic adjustment.

1895 John Diefenbaker, 13th Prime Minister of Canada, was born (d. 1979).

1898  Fashoda Incident – Lord Kitchener’s ships reached Fashoda, Sudan.

1900 Seewoosagur Ramgoolam, 1st Prime Minister of Mauritius, was born (d. 1985).

1905  Agnes de Mille, American choreographer, was born (d. 1993).

1905  Greta Garbo, Swedish actress, was born(d. 1990) .

1906 A typhoon on with tsunami killed an estimated 10,000 people in Hong Kong.

1910  In Amsterdam, 25,000 demonstrated for general suffrage.

1911  Russian Premier Peter Stolypin was shot at the Kiev Opera House.

1914 The Irish Home Rule Act became law, but was delayed until after World War I.

1919 The Netherlands gave women the right to vote.

1919 – Fritz Pollard became the first African-American to play professional football for a major team, the Akron Pros.

1923 Queen Anne of Romania was born.

1928  Juan de la Cierva made the first autogyro crossing of the English Channel.

1931 The Mukden Incident gave Japan the pretext to invade and occupy Manchuria.

1937 David and Mary McGregor moved in to New Zealand’s first state house.

First state house opened in Miramar

1939 Jorge Sampaio, President of Portugal, was born.

1939 World War II: Polish government of Ignacy Mościcki fled to Romania.

1939   William Joyce made his first Nazi propaganda broadcast.

1940  World War II: Italian troops conquered Sidi Barrani.

1942  The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was authorized.

1943  World War II: The Jews of Minsk were massacred at Sobibór.

1943 – World ar II: Adolf Hitler ordered the deportation of Danish Jews.

1944  World War II: The British submarine HMS Tradewind torpedoed Junyō Maru, 5,600 killed.

1948  Communist Madiun uprising in Dutch Indies.

1948 –Margaret Chase Smith of Maine became the first woman elected to the US Senate without completing another senator’s term, when she defeated Democratic opponent Adrian Scolten.

1948 – The Donald Bradman-led Australian cricket team completed the unprecedented feat of going through an English summer without defeat.

1952 Dee Dee Ramone, American bassist (The Ramones), was born (d. 2002).

1959 Vanguard 3 was launched into Earth orbit.

1961  U.N. Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld died in a plane crash while attempting to negotiate peace in the war-torn Katanga region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

1964  Constantine II of Greece married Danish princess Anne-Marie.

1971 Lance Armstrong, American cyclist, was born.

1972  First Ugandans expelled by Idi Amin arrived in the United Kingdom.

1974 Hurricane Fifi struck Honduras with 110 mph winds, killing 5,000 people.

1975 Patty Hearst was arrested after a year on the FBI Most Wanted List.

1976 Mao Zedong‘s funeral in Beijing.

1980 Soyuz 38 carried 2 cosmonauts (including 1 Cuban) to Salyut 6 space station.

1981 Assemblée Nationale voted to abolish capital punishment in France.

1982  Christian militia began killing six-hundred Palestinians in Lebanon.

1984  Joe Kittinger completed the first solo balloon crossing of the Atlantic.

1988 End of pro-democracy uprisings in Myanmar after a bloody military coup by the State Law and Order Restoration Council.

1991 Yugoslavia began a naval blockade of 7 Adriatic port cities.

1992  An explosion rocks Giant Mine at the height of a labour dispute, killing 9 replacement workers.

1997  United States media magnate Ted Turner donated $US1 billion to the United Nations.

1997 – Voters in Wales voted yes (50.3%) on a referendum on Welsh autonomy.

1998  ICANN was formed.

2001  First mailing of anthrax letters from Trenton, New Jersey in the 2001 anthrax attacks.

2006 Right wing protesters riot the building of the Hungarian Television in Budapest.

2007 Pervez Musharraf announced he would step down as army chief and restore civilian rule to Pakistan, but only after he was re-elected president.

2007 Buddhist monks joined anti-government protesters in Myanmar, starting the Saffron Revolution.

2009 The 72 year run of the soap opera The Guiding Light ended as its final episode is broadcast.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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