On the topic of off-topic

September 9, 2014

Until recently I had deleted very few comments and, from memory, that was either because they were defamatory or personal attacks.

However, continual spamming and off-topic comments by one commenter persuaded me to get tougher and delete comments which were off-topic.

Robert continued to post such comments so often I am holding them for moderation.

I still allow most of them through, even the ones full of bile and erroneous opinions masquerading as facts.

Every now and then he leaves a comment complaining about that the last two are these:

Ele – on a personal level – can you see how far you have fallen? You are DELETING comments that are OFF TOPIC.
Think about that.
Not comments that are lies, actionable or disgusting, but “Off topic”.
That’s how desperate you have become.
This is very sad, on a personal level. You are blocking comments that are “other” than what you want. Are you aware of how wrong your thinking has become?
“off topic” ids now your measure of comments that must be deleted?
You have fallen very far, Ele.
THINK ABOUT THIS!
“Off topic” is not your measure for deletion.
Sad.
Sick.
Worrying.
DELETING.
CENSORING.
What have you become????

 

And:

“the only proof that’s needed is my judgement. Ele”

The reasoning of a dictator. Ele. Think! What have you become???

I don’t need to think about this. This is my blog and I make the rules.

It is public in that anyone can read it and leave a comment but it is up to me to accept or reject any or all comments as I see fit.

Saturday and Sunday soap boxes allow people to discuss almost anything and I am generally lenient about discussions which take a few diversions on other posts.

But I am not going to accept spam and comments which have nothing to do with the post under which they are made.

 


Word of the day

September 9, 2014

Agnoiology – the study of culturally induced ignorance or doubt, particularly the publication of inaccurate or misleading scientific data; the study of the nature of ignorance or of what it is impossible to know; a particular theory concerning this;  theory of ignorance.


Rural round-up

September 9, 2014

Getting wools’ act together –  Rick Powdrell:

I am so tempted to email Dr Russel Norman, the Green’s co-leader, a link to Weird Al” Yankovic’s version of Lorde’s Royals; called Foil.  It is a sendup of conspiracies and Dr Norman’s repeated use of ‘dairy corporations,’ on TV3’s The Nation, brought it to mind.  

According to Dr Norman ‘dairy corporations’ are behind bad water quality and they’re masterminding economic planning too.  Of course he has the answer; clean green 100% pure branded success.  It’s big on sound bite but low on detail.  I also suspect it involves breaking up these ‘dairy corporations,’ which are mostly farmer cooperatives.  

Being a sheep and beef farmer that’s a scary thought given we must be next, being New Zealand’s number two export and chock full of ‘meat and fibre corporations.’ . . .

No bees no food, no people:

Without the incredible honeybee, two-thirds of the food we take for granted would almost vanish, making life as we know it impossible.

“The reality is that no bees mean no food and no people. That’s no joke because bees make civilisation possible,” says John Hartnell, Federated Farmers Bees Chairperson and a Christchurch based exporter of bee products.

“If we don’t look after all natural pollinators and the honeybee especially, we could see economic and social collapse.  We are truly tiptoeing around the edge of a global chasm.

“One-third of the food all humans eat is directly pollinated by honeybees.  Nothing comes close to matching nature’s super pollinator.  It is why the honeybee is most indispensable animal to modern society. . . .

Master status conferred on four for shearing skill

Two machine shearers, a woolhandler and a blades shearer have been accorded master status by Shearing Sports New Zealand.

Rakaia machine shearer Tony Coster, Christchurch blades shearer Brian Thomson, Invercargill machine shearer Nathan Stratford and Gisborne woolhandler Joel Henare earned the honour.

The organisation said Coster and Stratford were among New Zealand’s top multibreeds shearers, having each won the PGG Wrightson national series final in Masterton and the New Zealand shears circuit final in Te Kuiti. Coster won the national three times and Stratford won the title earlier this year.

Thomson has shorn in the individual and teams finals at three consecutive world championships. . . .

The beef lifecycle from farm to fork:

The beef lifecycle is perhaps one of the most unique and complex lifecycles of any food. It takes anywhere from 2-3 years to bring beef from farm to fork. Unlike other animal protein production chains, such as chicken or pork, the beef community is not vertically integrated, meaning that an animal will change owners or caretakers an average of 2-3 times during its lifetime. Each caretaker along the way specializes in a key area of a cow’s life, providing the proper care, nutrition and animal health plans that the animal needs at that specific point in its life.

The farmers and ranchers at each stage of the beef lifecycle utilize diverse resources available in their geographic area, such as local feedstuffs, land that can’t be used to raise crops, or grass that might grow all year around. The entire beef community focuses on proper animal care, such as Beef Quality Assurance, in order to raise high-quality beef for millions of people around the world to enjoy. . .

Policy makers turn to small holder farmers as partners in development – Food Tank:

Partners in the Global Forum for Agricultural Research (GFAR) share a deep commitment to meeting the development needs of resource-poor farmers. Development workers are seeking ways to better align and cross-link humanitarian aid and development agendas to enable growth out of crises and build agricultural systems that are more resilient to shocks. More than 800 experts and participants from across a wide range of sectors and 75 countries recently convened at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 2020 Conference to strategize how to promote food and nutrition security by increasing smallholder resilience.

The conference is part of a two-year global consultative process that will help development agencies ensure that smallholders have the resources they need to endure and rebound from local and global economic, political, and environmental crises. The need for knowledge and innovation to achieve greater resilience among smallholder farmers was also discussed extensively at the International Encounters on Family Farming and Research, which was held in Montpellier, France and organized by Agropolis International, GFAR, World Rural Forum (WRF), CGIAR, and the French government. . .

                                    * * * * *

 


How English are you?

September 9, 2014

How English are you?

You are 19% English! That makes you “Not English in the Least Bit.”

You are as English as Napoleon Bonaparte was tall. That’s all I have to say about that.          

Blame it on all the tartan genes but I was hoping I’d get that sort of answer.


How much will people pay?

September 9, 2014

A correspondent to the Otago Daily Times, rev Steve O’Connor, (not online) asks:

Is it stupid to try to clean up our rivers and lakes inside a generation? Is it stupid to aspire to having all rivers and lakes swimmable, fishable and suitable for food gathering? Is it stupid to have regulatory safeguards and charge a little bit for large water takes for irrigation? . . .

We don’t have to choose between a thriving primary industry and clean water. We can have both. . .

To which Ian Mackenzie, a Federated Farmers board member responds:

The question Rev Steve O’Connor should be asking is how much he is prepared to pay in extra rates to clean up the Leith to swimming standards? that is to the standards of Moana Pool.

At the moment, run-off from the streets of Dunedin contaminates the Leith to about four times the acceptable level of E. Coli for safe swimming.

That has nothing to do with farming but it is he and the greater population of North Dunedin who are responsible.

I can now swim safely in the creek that flows through my farm because for years we have been investing in stock exclusion and riparian planting to ensure good water quality .

What did the rev O’Connor’s boss say about ‘he who is without sin’?

It is possible to have a thriving primary industry and clean water.

It is also possible to have clean water in urban areas but it will take time and money to achieve the high standard required for food gathering and swimming in many places.

How do the urban people so keen to have farmers – who by and large are already doing their bit to clean up the waterways they border – pay more, feel about paying to clean up waterways in their towns and cities?


Stay on course

September 9, 2014

National’s clear economic plan and careful financial management is taking New Zealand in the right direction. ntnl.org.nz/1lQaKiR #Working4NZ

We can stay on course for continued growth and the economic, environmental and social dividends that supports or go off course, lose momentum, and the opportunities sustainable growth provides.


Not as blue as polls paint it

September 9, 2014

Successive polls are showing National at around 50%.

That ought to be good news, but a Facebook friend looked at polls and elections results and found:

. . . In the final month of polling in 2011, we averaged 52.1%. On election day, we got 47.31% – a drop of about 4.8%.

In the final month of polling in 2008, we averaged 47.1%. On election day? 44.93% – a drop of about 2.2%.

In the polls currently taken in the month before E Day, we are averaging 48.91%. The polls that dragged the mean down in the final month of polling in the previous two elections (the ones taken in the final two weeks), have not been taken yet.

What does this mean?

The polls may go down. We may lose support. E Day could be worse.

If we expect previous trends to repeat themselves, we are on track for an MMP, nail-biting, screaming-at-the-tv, 1 seat majority, hum-dinger. . .

The election result is very, very unlikely to be as blue as the polls are painting it.

An outright majority was very rare under First Past the Post. It hasn’t happened yet under MMP and is very unlikely to this year.

The trend for Labour is downwards but if National’s vote drops much below the polls, we might not get a John Key- led government and it could be possible for David Cunliffe to cobble together a coalition with the collection of mis-matched parties on the far left.


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