Word of the day

September 3, 2014

Deedy – industrious; effective; earnest.


Only party vote for National will stop him

September 3, 2014

Kim Dotcom voted today – with cameras following:

It’s a secret ballot but there’s no secret that he’d be voting for what he’s paying for –  a last-ditch attempt to avoid extradition.

The only way to stop the puppets whose strings he’s pulling having any say in government is a party vote for National.

Unless there’s a major change from recent polls, Labour and the Greens won’t have enough support to govern without the support of New Zealand First and the Internet and Mana parties – together or apart.

Dotcom can’t stand for parliament but he’s paying other people to do it for him and once there he’ll want to extract a price.

He would be the puppet master shadowing a Labour/Green/NZ First/ Internet/Mana coalition.

Only if there’s a National-led government will he be unable to pull any influential strings.

Only a party vote for  National deliver that.


Rural round-up

September 3, 2014

Scientist warns of soil biodiversity loss:

The scientist responsible for making next year the United Nations International Year of Soils says far too little is known about the microscopic life forms which are critical to healthy soil.

Stephen Nortcliff is the Emeritus Professor of Soil Science at the University of Reading in England.

He said there has been a massive loss of biodiversity across the globe thanks to human intervention and it was not clear how much of that loss had happened beneath our feet. . . .

Be Good to Bees Because … September is Bee Aware Month:

September is Bee Aware Month and the National Beekeepers Association is urging all Kiwis to promote and protect the New Zealand bee population.

“We want Kiwis to Be Good to Bees Because … they support over $5 billion annually of the country’s agri-industry exports and they help to grow one third of all the food we eat, never mind helping our home gardens to flourish,” says NBA chief executive, Daniel Paul.

“The bees in New Zealand are faring a lot better than in many other countries, where bee populations are often under threat, but we still need to promote and protect our Kiwi bees. . .

University of Canterbury to help with forestry safety:

The University of Canterbury is to launch a new research project to make sure New Zealand’s new forestry roads are safe and are established with minimal environmental impact.

The New Zealand forestry industry is building more than 1400km of new roads a year and the research, to be conducted by Dr Kris Brown, will help improve design standards.

“The importance of infrastructure is widely recognised by forestry stakeholders, but the New Zealand Independent Forestry Safety Review Panel has heard that the quality and adequacy of forestry roads, bridges and skid sites are variable and often not up to the mark.

“I hope our research at the university’s School of Forestry will help raise standards for design, construction and maintenance of forestry roads. . . .

 Irrigators under pressure are offered help:

IrrigationNZ is helping irrigators respond to increasing public pressure by educating them on how they can reduce their impact on New Zealand’s waterways.

The ‘Great Irrigation Challenge’, a training and information event, will also help irrigators understand what the government’s new freshwater policy means and how to respond to it with practical and technical solutions.

“In the context of extreme public scrutiny on water use for agriculture as a dairy farmer or industry investor, sharemilker, farm manager or staff member, your livelihood and business continuity more than ever requires a high level of knowledge, expertise and skill,” says Andrew Curtis IrrigationNZ CEO. . . .

 Five vying for DairyNZ director position:

Five nominations have been received for the farmer-elected director position on the DairyNZ board:

The five farmers seeking a four year term as a DairyNZ director are:

* Donna Smit (Whakatane, Bay of Plenty)

* Murray Jamieson (Okaihau, Northland)

* Greg Maughan (Marton, Manawatu),

* Jim van der Poel (Ohaupo, Waikato) and

* Dirk Sieling (Whitianga, Waikato)
The election follows the resignation of Taranaki farmer Barbara Kuriger, who is standing down from the board to dedicate herself to her new role as the National Party candidate for the Taranaki-King Country electorate in the September General Election. . . .

 

Farmers Don’t Have to Wait for Rural Broadband

Farmers who want to harness rapid advancements in agricultural technology don’t have to wait for rural broadband to reach their property, with internet service provider Wireless Nation working with PGG Wrightson to make slow and unreliable rural internet a thing of the past.

Wireless Nation has already been receiving positive feedback from rural customers since it started rolling out satellite broadband through the Optus satellite network, earlier this year.

Paul Sheridan, Vice President, Optus Satellite, says, “We operate dedicated transponders on our D2 satellite that provide very good line-of-sight to New Zealand’s landmass. This means that Wireless Nation can be confident in the delivery of quality broadband services to their customers regardless of where they are based.” . . .

 


Vote early . . .

September 3, 2014

Vote early and vote often is a quote attributed to Chicago gangsters.

The often, in the same election, is illegal in well run democracies but the early is good advice for anyone who is going to be busy or away on election day.

Polling booths opened today.

In times past you had to give a reason for an early vote, but electoral law now allows you to cast an early vote simply because you choose to.
Advance voting is now open! Visit www.national.org.nz/campaign to find out where you can PARTY VOTE NATIONAL.  Share this with your friends and family to ensure we get another strong, stable John Key-led National government with a plan to keep #Working4NZ.

New Zealand National Party

Advance voting is now open! Visit www.national.org.nz/campaign to find out where you can PARTY VOTE NATIONAL.

Share this with your friends and family to ensure we get another strong, stable John Key-led National government with a plan to keep ‪#‎Working4NZ‬.

Simple – give your electorate vote to the national candidate to get the right  MP in parliament and your party vote to National to get the right party leading the government.

If you’re not enrolled, it’s not too late – you can found out what to do here.

Information on voting from overseas is here.


CGT complicated, complex and costly

September 3, 2014

Prime Minister John Key floored David Cunliffe last night when he couldn’t answer whether or not Labour’s capital gains tax would apply to homes owned by trusts.

After the debate he said it wouldn’t but that’s not what the policy says:

David Cunliffe’s inability to answer the most basic questions about Labour’s proposed capital gains tax underlines key problems identified by successive tax reviews, National Party Finance Spokesman Bill English says.

“David Cunliffe’s failure to explain how he would implement a new capital gains tax, which has now been Labour policy for more than three years, will leave many thousands of New Zealanders confused and uncertain,” Mr English says.

“Nowhere in Labour’s capital gains tax policy does it exclude family homes owned by trusts. In fact, Labour actually says: ‘We will ensure trusts are not used as a means of avoiding a CGT’. David Cunliffe cannot have it both ways.

“And now Labour is trying to say the test for whether a capital gains tax applies is not whether a trust owns the property, but who lives in it. That would require Inland Revenue to confirm the living arrangements of householders in deciding whether the tax would apply.

What if there are adult children paying rent?

What if there is a boarder?

What if the boarder is a relative, for example an elderly parent?

Would it make a difference if the relative lived in a granny flat?

Would it make a difference if someone living in the granny flat wasn’t a relative?

What if there’s more than one family in the house?

“This latest confusion follows Labour previously making contradictory claims about whether the KiwiSaver accounts of 2.3 million New Zealanders would be exempt from their new tax. They now claim they would be exempt, but this is not reflected in their policy or their costings.”

Mr English says Labour’s proposed capital gains tax was already full of holes, applying only to only a quarter of the housing market, but to every New Zealand business and farm.

“All of this underlines what tax experts and independent reviews have said over the past 20 years. Implementing an extra capital gains tax would be much more complicated and confusing in practice than it appears in theory.

“By contrast, National’s clear economic plan is successfully supporting higher wages and more jobs. It is steering New Zealand back to surplus this year and ensuring government spending is invested wisely to deliver better results.

“The five new taxes promised by Labour and the Greens would stall the New Zealand economy and cost thousands of jobs.”

People who trade in property or shares already pay taxes on the capital gains.

Introducing Labour’s CTG CGT would add cost  and complexity to the tax system which wouldn’t be justified by the money raised.

Labour wants to introduce a CTG CGT and  four more taxes for the worst reason – so it can spend more.

The best way to increase the tax take is through economic growth which enables businesses to make bigger profits, increase jobs and wages.

The worst way is to increase tax rates and add new taxes which add complications, complexity and costs and put a hand brake on economic growth.


National working for and in the south # 19

September 3, 2014

Fantastic Fact # 19:


Best places to be born

September 3, 2014

Where is it best to be born?

A QUARTER of a century ago, The World in 1988 light-heartedly ranked 50 countries according to where would be the best place to be born. Then, America came top (see chart on left). Now the Economist Intelligence Unit has more earnestly calculated where would be best to be born in 2013. Its quality-of-life index links the results of subjective life-satisfaction surveys—how happy people say they are—to objective determinants of the quality of life across countries. Being rich helps more than anything else, but it is not all that counts—things like crime and trust in public institutions matter too. In all, the index takes 11 indicators into account. Some are fixed, such as geography; others change only very slowly over time (demography, social and cultural characteristics). . .

New Zealand is 7th.

Being rich isn’t all that counts but it helps more than most.

This is why National puts such strong emphasis on the economy – not as an end in itself but as the means to better economic, social and environmental outcomes for New Zealand and New Zealanders.

 


Of course it’s the economy

September 3, 2014

The latest Roy Morgan poll identifies economic issues as the most important in New Zealand:

 Just three weeks before NZ heads to a National Election, Economic issues (41%, down 3% since May 2014) are still clearly the most important problems facing New Zealand however the biggest problems facing the World today are War & Terrorism issues (35%, up a huge 15% since May) now ahead of Economic Issues for the first time ever according to the latest Roy Morgan Research conducted in July and August 2014.

New Zealand views on Problems facing New Zealand
When asked about the most important problem facing New Zealand, 41% of New Zealanders mention some kind of Economic issue. This is down 3% since May 2014 but still well ahead of Social issues (24%, up 3%), Government/ Public policy/ Human rights issues (19%, up 1%) and Environmental issues (6%, down 2%). . . .

Of course it’s the economy and economic issues that matter.

Only if the economy is growing can we afford the first world social services and infrastructure we need and the only way to make funding for these sustainable is with sustainable economic growth.

National’s policies are sustainable, Labour/Green/New Zealand First/ Internet Mana ones aren’t.

 

 


GDT drops 6%

September 3, 2014

GlobalDairyTrade’s price index took another fall in this morning’s auction:

gdt30914

 

gdt3.914

One of our staff is Dutch and keeps up with news from home on the internet.

He said the Russian boycott of produce was causing a glut of vegetables in Holland. It will also be one of the factors impacting on dairy prices.

Meanwhile Russia will have to spend billions subsidising its farmers.

Russia’s agriculture minister has warned that Moscow must spend billions of dollars in the coming years subsidising farmers in order to avoid a shortage caused by its ban on most Western foods.

Agriculture Minister Nokolai Fyodorov’s stark comments on Wednesday (local time) represented Moscow’s first admission that its decision to strike back at US and EU sanctions with sweeping food bans, including those against Australia, may have long-term costs for both its budget and consumers.

The trade war is part of a broader crisis in East-West relations sparked by Russia’s perceived attempts to split strife-torn Ukraine in two after Kiev’s decision to seek a closer political and economic alliance with Europe.

Russia relies heavily on foreign fruits and vegetables because its long winters and inhospitable climate keep farmers from growing produce desired by the country’s booming middle class.

It also imports huge volumes of Australian and European meat along with US poultry and Norwegian salmon – all banned under Russian President Vladimir Putin’s orders earlier this month. . .

Russia isn’t boycotting our produce but goods not allowed into Russia will be competing with ours elsewhere.


Five more taxes

September 3, 2014

Three years ago John Key asked then-Labour leader Phil Goff to show him the money and he couldn’t.

Last night the Prime Minister asked Labour’s current leader David Cunliffe if people who’s home is in a trust would have to pay a capital gains tax and he wouldn’t answer.

If it would it would hit more than 200,000 families.

There is no tax advantage for having a home in a trust but people use trusts for other reasons.

Even if homes in trusts wouldn’t be hit, farms and businesses would be. That would impose extra costs and reduce profitability.

The PM asked Cunliffe if New Zealand already has a CTG, he said no.

The PM responded that he knows the tax code and we do.

He also pointed out that a Labour/Green government would add five more taxes.

That’s a big point of difference.

National will continue to manage public spending well and let people keep more of their own money; Labour and the Green Party would tax more so they can spend more.

 

We're with John. #teamkey #keyvcunliffe


September 3 in history

September 3, 2014

36 BC  In the Battle of Naulochus, Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, admiral of Octavian, defeated Sextus Pompeius, son of Pompey, thus ending Pompeian resistance to the Second Triumvirate.

301 San Marino, one of the smallest nations in the world and the world’s oldest republic still in existence, was founded by Saint Marinus.

590  Consecration of Pope Gregory the Great.

863  Major Byzantine victory at the Battle of Lalakaon against an Arab raid.

1189  Richard I of England (Richard “the Lionheart”) was crowned at Westminster.

1260  The Mamluks defeated the Mongols at the Battle of Ain Jalut in Palestine, marking their first decisive defeat and the point of maximum expansion of the Mongol Empire.

1650  Third English Civil War: Battle of Dunbar.

1651  Third English Civil War: Battle of Worcester – Charles II of England was defeated in the last main battle of the war.

1666  The Royal Exchange burned down in the Great Fire of London

1777  Cooch’s Bridge – Skirmish of American Revolutionary War in New Castle County, Delaware where the Flag of the United States was flown in battle for the first time.

1783  American Revolutionary War: The war ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris by the United States and Great Britain.

1798  The week long battle of St. George’s Caye began between Spanish and British off the coast of Belize.

1802 William Wordsworth composed the sonnet Composed upon Westminster Bridge.

1803  English scientist John Dalton began using symbols to represent the atoms of different elements.

1812  24 settlers were killed in the Pigeon Roost Massacre.

1838  Dressed in a sailor’s uniform and carrying identification papers provided by a Free Black seaman, future abolitionist Frederick Douglass boarded a train in Maryland on his way to freedom from slavery.

1870 Franco-Prussian War: the Siege of Metz began.

1875 – Ferdinand Porsche, Austrian-German engineer and businessman, founded Porsche (d. 1951)

1878 More than 640 died when the crowded pleasure boat Princess Alice collided with the Bywell Castle in the River Thames.

1899 – Frank Macfarlane Burnet, Australian virologist, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1985)

1905 – John Mills, New Zealand cricketer (d. 1972)

1914  William, Prince of Albania left the country after just six months due to opposition to his rule.

1933 Yevgeniy Abalakov reached the highest point of the Soviet Union – Communism Peak (7495 m).

1935  Sir Malcolm Campbell reached speed of 304.331 miles per hour on the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, becoming the first person to drive a car over 300 mph.

1939  World War II: France, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Australia declared war on Germany after the invasion of Poland, forming the Allies. In contrast to its entry into the First World War, New Zealand acted in its own right.

New Zealand declares war on Germany

1940 Pauline Collins, English actress, was born.

1941 Holocaust: Karl Fritzsch, deputy camp commandant of the Auschwitz concentration camp, experimented with the use of Zyklon B in the gassing of Soviet POWs.

1942 Al Jardine, American musician (The Beach Boys), was born.

1942  World War II: In response to news of its coming liquidation, Dov Lopatyn led an uprising in the Lakhva Ghetto.

1944  Holocaust: Diarist Anne Frank and her family were placed on the last transport train from Westerbork to Auschwitz.

1945 – Three-day celebration was held in China, following the Victory over Japan Day on September 2.

1947 Eric Bell, Irish guitarist (Thin Lizzy), was born.

1950 “Nino” Farina became the first Formula One Drivers’ champion after winning the 1950 Italian Grand Prix.

1951 The first long-running American television soap opera, Search for Tomorrow, aired its first episode on the CBS network.

1955 Steve Jones, English musician (Sex Pistols), was born.

1958 Pioneering heart surgeon Brian Barratt-Boyes performed New Zealand’s first open heart  surgery using a heart-lung bypass machine.

First open-heart surgery in NZ

1967  Dagen H in Sweden: traffic changed from driving on the left to driving on the right overnight.

1971 Qatar became an independent state.

1976 The Viking 2 spacecraft landed at Utopia Planitia on Mars.

1987  In a coup d’état in Burundi, President Jean-Baptiste Bagaza was deposed by Major Pierre Buyoya.

1994 Sino-Soviet Split: Russia and the People’s Republic of China agreed to de-target their nuclear weapons against each other.

1997 A Vietnam Airlines Tupolev TU-134 crashed on approach into Phnom Penh airport, killing 64.

1999  87-automobile pile-up on Highway 401 freeway just east of Windsor, Ontario, after an unusually thick fog from Lake St. Clair.

2004  Beslan school hostage crisis: Day 3: The Beslan hostage crisis ended with the deaths of morethan 300 people, more than half of whom were children.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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