Word of the day

September 3, 2014

Deedy – industrious; effective; earnest.


Only party vote for National will stop him

September 3, 2014

Kim Dotcom voted today – with cameras following:

It’s a secret ballot but there’s no secret that he’d be voting for what he’s paying for –  a last-ditch attempt to avoid extradition.

The only way to stop the puppets whose strings he’s pulling having any say in government is a party vote for National.

Unless there’s a major change from recent polls, Labour and the Greens won’t have enough support to govern without the support of New Zealand First and the Internet and Mana parties – together or apart.

Dotcom can’t stand for parliament but he’s paying other people to do it for him and once there he’ll want to extract a price.

He would be the puppet master shadowing a Labour/Green/NZ First/ Internet/Mana coalition.

Only if there’s a National-led government will he be unable to pull any influential strings.

Only a party vote for  National deliver that.


Rural round-up

September 3, 2014

Scientist warns of soil biodiversity loss:

The scientist responsible for making next year the United Nations International Year of Soils says far too little is known about the microscopic life forms which are critical to healthy soil.

Stephen Nortcliff is the Emeritus Professor of Soil Science at the University of Reading in England.

He said there has been a massive loss of biodiversity across the globe thanks to human intervention and it was not clear how much of that loss had happened beneath our feet. . . .

Be Good to Bees Because … September is Bee Aware Month:

September is Bee Aware Month and the National Beekeepers Association is urging all Kiwis to promote and protect the New Zealand bee population.

“We want Kiwis to Be Good to Bees Because … they support over $5 billion annually of the country’s agri-industry exports and they help to grow one third of all the food we eat, never mind helping our home gardens to flourish,” says NBA chief executive, Daniel Paul.

“The bees in New Zealand are faring a lot better than in many other countries, where bee populations are often under threat, but we still need to promote and protect our Kiwi bees. . .

University of Canterbury to help with forestry safety:

The University of Canterbury is to launch a new research project to make sure New Zealand’s new forestry roads are safe and are established with minimal environmental impact.

The New Zealand forestry industry is building more than 1400km of new roads a year and the research, to be conducted by Dr Kris Brown, will help improve design standards.

“The importance of infrastructure is widely recognised by forestry stakeholders, but the New Zealand Independent Forestry Safety Review Panel has heard that the quality and adequacy of forestry roads, bridges and skid sites are variable and often not up to the mark.

“I hope our research at the university’s School of Forestry will help raise standards for design, construction and maintenance of forestry roads. . . .

 Irrigators under pressure are offered help:

IrrigationNZ is helping irrigators respond to increasing public pressure by educating them on how they can reduce their impact on New Zealand’s waterways.

The ‘Great Irrigation Challenge’, a training and information event, will also help irrigators understand what the government’s new freshwater policy means and how to respond to it with practical and technical solutions.

“In the context of extreme public scrutiny on water use for agriculture as a dairy farmer or industry investor, sharemilker, farm manager or staff member, your livelihood and business continuity more than ever requires a high level of knowledge, expertise and skill,” says Andrew Curtis IrrigationNZ CEO. . . .

 Five vying for DairyNZ director position:

Five nominations have been received for the farmer-elected director position on the DairyNZ board:

The five farmers seeking a four year term as a DairyNZ director are:

* Donna Smit (Whakatane, Bay of Plenty)

* Murray Jamieson (Okaihau, Northland)

* Greg Maughan (Marton, Manawatu),

* Jim van der Poel (Ohaupo, Waikato) and

* Dirk Sieling (Whitianga, Waikato)
The election follows the resignation of Taranaki farmer Barbara Kuriger, who is standing down from the board to dedicate herself to her new role as the National Party candidate for the Taranaki-King Country electorate in the September General Election. . . .

 

Farmers Don’t Have to Wait for Rural Broadband

Farmers who want to harness rapid advancements in agricultural technology don’t have to wait for rural broadband to reach their property, with internet service provider Wireless Nation working with PGG Wrightson to make slow and unreliable rural internet a thing of the past.

Wireless Nation has already been receiving positive feedback from rural customers since it started rolling out satellite broadband through the Optus satellite network, earlier this year.

Paul Sheridan, Vice President, Optus Satellite, says, “We operate dedicated transponders on our D2 satellite that provide very good line-of-sight to New Zealand’s landmass. This means that Wireless Nation can be confident in the delivery of quality broadband services to their customers regardless of where they are based.” . . .

 


Vote early . . .

September 3, 2014

Vote early and vote often is a quote attributed to Chicago gangsters.

The often, in the same election, is illegal in well run democracies but the early is good advice for anyone who is going to be busy or away on election day.

Polling booths opened today.

In times past you had to give a reason for an early vote, but electoral law now allows you to cast an early vote simply because you choose to.
Advance voting is now open! Visit www.national.org.nz/campaign to find out where you can PARTY VOTE NATIONAL.  Share this with your friends and family to ensure we get another strong, stable John Key-led National government with a plan to keep #Working4NZ.

New Zealand National Party

Advance voting is now open! Visit www.national.org.nz/campaign to find out where you can PARTY VOTE NATIONAL.

Share this with your friends and family to ensure we get another strong, stable John Key-led National government with a plan to keep ‪#‎Working4NZ‬.

Simple – give your electorate vote to the national candidate to get the right  MP in parliament and your party vote to National to get the right party leading the government.

If you’re not enrolled, it’s not too late – you can found out what to do here.

Information on voting from overseas is here.


CGT complicated, complex and costly

September 3, 2014

Prime Minister John Key floored David Cunliffe last night when he couldn’t answer whether or not Labour’s capital gains tax would apply to homes owned by trusts.

After the debate he said it wouldn’t but that’s not what the policy says:

David Cunliffe’s inability to answer the most basic questions about Labour’s proposed capital gains tax underlines key problems identified by successive tax reviews, National Party Finance Spokesman Bill English says.

“David Cunliffe’s failure to explain how he would implement a new capital gains tax, which has now been Labour policy for more than three years, will leave many thousands of New Zealanders confused and uncertain,” Mr English says.

“Nowhere in Labour’s capital gains tax policy does it exclude family homes owned by trusts. In fact, Labour actually says: ‘We will ensure trusts are not used as a means of avoiding a CGT’. David Cunliffe cannot have it both ways.

“And now Labour is trying to say the test for whether a capital gains tax applies is not whether a trust owns the property, but who lives in it. That would require Inland Revenue to confirm the living arrangements of householders in deciding whether the tax would apply.

What if there are adult children paying rent?

What if there is a boarder?

What if the boarder is a relative, for example an elderly parent?

Would it make a difference if the relative lived in a granny flat?

Would it make a difference if someone living in the granny flat wasn’t a relative?

What if there’s more than one family in the house?

“This latest confusion follows Labour previously making contradictory claims about whether the KiwiSaver accounts of 2.3 million New Zealanders would be exempt from their new tax. They now claim they would be exempt, but this is not reflected in their policy or their costings.”

Mr English says Labour’s proposed capital gains tax was already full of holes, applying only to only a quarter of the housing market, but to every New Zealand business and farm.

“All of this underlines what tax experts and independent reviews have said over the past 20 years. Implementing an extra capital gains tax would be much more complicated and confusing in practice than it appears in theory.

“By contrast, National’s clear economic plan is successfully supporting higher wages and more jobs. It is steering New Zealand back to surplus this year and ensuring government spending is invested wisely to deliver better results.

“The five new taxes promised by Labour and the Greens would stall the New Zealand economy and cost thousands of jobs.”

People who trade in property or shares already pay taxes on the capital gains.

Introducing Labour’s CTG CGT would add cost  and complexity to the tax system which wouldn’t be justified by the money raised.

Labour wants to introduce a CTG CGT and  four more taxes for the worst reason – so it can spend more.

The best way to increase the tax take is through economic growth which enables businesses to make bigger profits, increase jobs and wages.

The worst way is to increase tax rates and add new taxes which add complications, complexity and costs and put a hand brake on economic growth.


National working for and in the south # 19

September 3, 2014

Fantastic Fact # 19:


Best places to be born

September 3, 2014

Where is it best to be born?

A QUARTER of a century ago, The World in 1988 light-heartedly ranked 50 countries according to where would be the best place to be born. Then, America came top (see chart on left). Now the Economist Intelligence Unit has more earnestly calculated where would be best to be born in 2013. Its quality-of-life index links the results of subjective life-satisfaction surveys—how happy people say they are—to objective determinants of the quality of life across countries. Being rich helps more than anything else, but it is not all that counts—things like crime and trust in public institutions matter too. In all, the index takes 11 indicators into account. Some are fixed, such as geography; others change only very slowly over time (demography, social and cultural characteristics). . .

New Zealand is 7th.

Being rich isn’t all that counts but it helps more than most.

This is why National puts such strong emphasis on the economy – not as an end in itself but as the means to better economic, social and environmental outcomes for New Zealand and New Zealanders.

 


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