Word of the day

August 26, 2014

Paludal of or relating to marshes or fens; marshy; living or occurring in a marshy habitat.


Williams off NZ First list

August 26, 2014

New Zealand First MP Andrew Williams has been left off his party’s list and another MP, Asenati Lole- Taylor, at 16 is unlikely to return to parliament:

1 Rt Hon Winston Peters
2 Tracey Martin
3 Richard Prosser
4 Fletcher Tabuteau
5 Barbara Stewart
6 Clayton Mitchell
7 Denis O’Rourke
8 Pita Paraone
9 Ron Mark
10 Darroch Ball
11 Mahesh Bindra
12 Ria Bond
13 Mataroa Paroro
14 Romuald Rudzki
15 Jon Reeves
16 Asenati Lole- Taylor
17 Brent Catchpole
18 George Abraham
19 Ray Dolman
20 Hugh Barr
21 Anne Degia Pala
22 Steve Campbell
23 Edwin Perry
24 Bill Gudgeon
25 Brent Pierson

Williams’ selection three years ago was criticised but he’s largely stayed out of trouble since he’s been in parliament.

Lole- Taylor has been in the news for some very silly statements. Some are so silly people have trouble differentiating between the fake Twitter account in her name and her real one.


Maori Party list

August 26, 2014

 

The Maori Party has released its list for the 2014 election:
1. Te Ururoa Flavell (Waiariki)
2. Marama Fox (Ikaroa Rawhiti)
3. Chris McKenzie – Te Tai Hauauru
4. Te Hira Paenga (Te Tai Tokerau)
5. Ngaire Button (Te Tai Tonga)
6. Nancy Tuaine (Whanganui)
7. Tame Iti
8. Eraia Kiel
9. Anaru Kaipo (Whangarei)
10. Raewyn Bhana (Manurewa)
11. Rangimarie Naida Glavish
12. Aroha Reriti-Crofts (Waimakariri)
13. Hinurewa Te Hau (Upper Harbour)
14. Tom Phillips (Hunua)
15. Verna Ohia-Gate (Tauranga)
16. Ann Kendall (Papakura)
17. Hiria Pakinga (Coromandel)
18. Claire Winitana (Taupo)
19. Ra Smith (Wairarapa)
20. Lenis Davidson (Christchurch Central)
21. Tania Mataki (Christchurch East)
22. Sheryl Gardyne (Selwyn)
23. Te Whe Ariki Phillips (Wigram)
24. Benita Wakefield (Ilam)

Tama Iti is a long way from getting in on current polling but is a radical face for the party:

. . . Speaking in the home he built himself in Ruatoki, Iti said he had always supported the Maori Party and had decided to stand to boost the party’s support and because he endorsed the work it had done in government.

“Not very long ago I wouldn’t have thought about it but I see there’s more achievement…with National in terms of the treaty settlements so we have come a long way,” he said.

Having a Maori voice in power had led to gains in areas such as health and social services for Maori and it was important for Maori “to be sitting on the table rather than across the road throwing rocks at each other”. . .

Small parties generally get punished for supporting a government.

Their followers high, and unrealistic, expectations aren’t met. But Iti recognises that the party has made gains through its coalition agreement which would have been impossible in opposition.


Rural round-up

August 26, 2014

Blood and guts all poachers left behind   – Sonita Chandar:

A steaming pile of blood and guts was all that was left of a mob of newly bought pigs after poachers visited a Tararua farm.

In an incident that occurred earlier this year, a farmer told of taking his young grandchildren to show them the new pigs but instead they found a distressing sight.

”We released the pigs in a paddock right in the middle of the farm and they didn’t even last a week. . .

Night raiders caught in the act

A Tararua victim of stock rustling and poaching had his security cameras stolen after police showed photos of alleged rustlers around sporting goods shops.

The theft is just one incident of many that have recently occurred in a small community where several farmers have had stock go missing.

Farmers were willing to share their stories but did not wish to have their names published for fear of retaliation.

Frustrated at being the target of stock rustlers and trespassing hunters, a farmer and his son installed surveillance cameras in trees earlier this year. . .

Agricultural exports to Japan – Keith Woodford:

Back in 1988, Japan was our most important market for both total exports and agri-food exports. Now, some 25 years later, the share of total exports going to Japan has declined from more than 18 percent down to less than six percent. In part this is because of the phenomenal rise of China. Also, in that 25 year period our global exports have increased greatly, so a loss in percentage is not necessarily surprising. But our exports to Japan have been declining in absolute as well as percentage terms. So what went wrong?

The simple but somewhat naïve answer is that the Japanese economic boom came to an end. The Japanese economy has indeed struggled during those times, but per capita incomes have remained much higher than almost everywhere else in Asia. The exceptions are the city states of Singapore, Hong Kong and Macau. The Japanese GDP per capita is still more than five times that of the Chinese. . .

Water system a winner on Mt Watkins :

Switching to a gravity-fed water system has paid off for East Otago farmers David and Sarah Smith.

The couple are equity managers on a 1463ha property, Mt Watkins, near Waikouaiti, farming in partnership with Mr Smith’s parents Rex and Glenys.

The family purchased the original 920ha block in 2005 and bought another 510ha, which was previously leased, three years ago. . . .

A little home cookery for orphan lambs – Diane Bishop:

David Hamill has a secret weapon when it comes to mothering lambs onto ewes.

The semi-retired Southland farmer has been using the popular baking ingredient vanilla essence as a mothering on tool for almost 50 years.

Hamill rubs the essence on both the orphan lamb and the ewe and it’s doesn’t take long for the ewe to bond with the lamb and accept it as her own.

”I’ve had huge success with it,” Hamill said. . .

Rabobank Recognises the Challenge of Farm Succession:

As part of Rabobank’s focus on assisting New Zealand farmers with the challenges of succession planning, the agricultural specialist bank has announced it has strengthened its succession team with the appointment of succession planning manager Chris Haworth.

An experienced agricultural banker who has been involved in family farm succession planning, Chris will be working with rural farming families to achieve their personal, family and business goals for each generation. . .


Do you know your capitals?

August 26, 2014

How’s your knowledge of capital cities?

I got 15/15 with two slightly informed guesses.

You got 15 questions correct: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
YOU GOT

World Scholar!

Congratulations! You pass the test! You did better than 60% of the people, you should be proud!

 


National working for and in the south #26

August 26, 2014

Fantastic Fact # 26:


Synthetic carpet not natural choice

August 26, 2014

This isn’t good news for wool growers:

Cavalier Corporation’s move into selling synthetic carpets into the New Zealand market is producing better returns than expected, as the group waits for better Australian trading and a fall in the kiwi dollar.

But this is better:

NZ wool carpet sales at the mid to upper ends of the market are also strong, with market share gains being achieved. . .

Synthetic isn’t the natural choice for carpets and it’s not good for the wool industry.

But wool has a good story in a world looking for greener products.

Wool is a natural, renewable fibre grown in New Zealand on free range animals.

If it can’t compete with synthetics at the bottom end of the market, it must have an advantage at the middle and top where people might be prepared to put their money where their desire for a cleaner, greener world is.


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