Word of the day

August 25, 2014

Fuscous – dark and sombre in colour; of brownish-gray; dusky.


Richard Attenborough 29.8.23 – 24.8.14

August 25, 2014

British actor and film director Richard Attenborough has died.

 

Oscar-winning British film director Richard Attenborough has died at the age of 90, his son has said.

Lord Attenborough was one of Britain’s leading actors, before becoming a highly successful director.

In a career that spanned six decades, he appeared in films including Brighton Rock, World War Two prisoner of war thriller The Great Escape and later in dinosaur blockbuster Jurassic Park.

As a director he was perhaps best known for Gandhi, which won him two Oscars. . . .

 

 


Rural round-up

August 25, 2014

Key skill is the attitude – Bryan Gibson:

I had the chance last week to spend an afternoon at the Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre in Masterton during a visit by Prime Minister John Key.

He spent more than an hour talking to staff and students and saw them at work milking, measuring pasture, washing down quad bikes and fencing. . .

Stint as ocean-going shepherd an eye-opener – Sally Rae:

When Fred Ellis boarded a ship at Port Chalmers in 1957 in charge of a consignment of stud sheep bound for Brazil, he was ”dead scared”.

His only previous sea experience was crossing Cook Strait on the Wellington-Lyttelton ferry in his school holidays.

Now in his 80s and retired in Inglewood, Taranaki, Mr Ellis contacted the Otago Daily Times after watching a recent Country Calendar episode which featured Central Otago.

It reminded him of his own exploits 57 years ago and he wondered where the sheep came from and how many subsequent exports of sheep to South America there had been. . . .

They don’t come here for fun – Alan Williams:

New Zealanders need to respect the reasons for migrant workers coming to this country to work, Waimate resource centre manager Steve Napper says.

Most of those he speaks to haven’t come just for the Kiwi way of life.

“They come from areas of the world with much greater deprivation than we experience and so come to earn a decent wage so they can support their families back home,” he said.

“That they come here to support their families instead of living large is to be admired.” . . .

Couple thrilled with move north – Sally Rae:

Dairying is likely be a regular topic of discussion in the Duffy household.

Husband and wife Mark and Sue Duffy work for artificial breeding company CRV Ambreed, which has a core business of dairy semen production and sales.

Mr Duffy is sales and services manager for the South Island, managing about 20 full-time staff, while Mrs Duffy is the regional sales and services manager, covering the area from Rakaia to Invercargill. . .

Alpaca breeders forming owners’ group – Sally Rae:

Interested in alpacas?

Southern alpaca breeders Brenda and Stewart McLean, of Windermere Alpacas, and Gordon Baird, of Waiwera Alpacas, have formed an Otago-Southland alpaca owners’ group.

The aim of the new group was to share information and help new and interested alpaca owners, following an increasing number of inquiries to breeders about basic alpaca care, from health and welfare through to feeding and shearing.

Mr Baird, from Waiwera South, in South Otago, first became interested in alpacas in the mid-1990s. . .

Winegrowers see growth through value:

Future wine industry growth will largely come from increased value, rather than from planting more vineyards, New Zealand Winegrowers chair Steve Green says.

The industry exports more than $1 billion worth of product and has set a target of nearly doubling that within two years.

It has confirmed a record grape harvest this year of 445,000 tonnes, up about 60,000 tonnes on last year. . .


National working for and in the south #27

August 25, 2014

Fantastic Fact # 27:


What is your calling in life?

August 25, 2014

What is your life’s calling?

Intellectual Genius

You have a fascinating mind. You’re very self-aware, wickedly smart (no doubt), sometimes a bit shy, and you tend to enjoy indoor hobbies just as much, if not more, than outdoor ones. You may not open up easily, but once you do, no one can compete with you. Your brilliance seems to increase by the day!

I think someone else must have answered most of these questions for me to come up with this answer.

 


National working for and in the south #28

August 25, 2014

Fantastic Fact # 28:

(In case you’re wondering that’s First Church, not Forsyth Barr Stadium, though there are some who regard sport, and rugby in particular, as a religion).


All aren’t equal

August 25, 2014

Teacher unions try to tell us that all teachers are equal, this survey gives the lie to that:

Two thirds of people remember a teacher who had a significant positive impact on their life, according to a survey.

And nearly everyone believes a good teacher can change the course of a student’s life, the survey commissioned by Warehouse Stationery found.

About 87 percent of respondents felt teachers had a “really hard job”, while eight out of ten said teachers were undervalued. . .

Good teachers can and do change their pupils’ lives for the better, teaching is a very difficult job and teachers are undervalued.

Schools can’t do much to change home environments but good teachers can do a lot for even the most disadvantaged children.

Not all teachers are good. Most could be with the right help and that is why putting resources into helping teachers be better is one of the best uses for extra funding in education.


%d bloggers like this: