Word of the day

August 10, 2014

Autarkic –  self-sufficient, especially economic, as applied to a nation; independent of imports.


Rural round-up

August 10, 2014

Transformation reaps top award – Annette Scott:

David Crutchley used to feel he was a lone voice but his rise to the top in the inaugural Green Agriculture Innovation Awards has transformed that loneliness to fame. He talked to Annette Scott.

David Crutchley might be familiar to many as a champion dog trialist on the popular 1980s television series A Dog’s Show.

Now he has won fame in the inaugural Green Agriculture Innovation Awards (GAIA) for innovation in pastoral transition.

Crutchley was the supreme winner of the awards.

The humble high-country farmer achieved ground-breaking results finding a profitable way to support growing family enterprises.

“The farm was dead,” he says. . .

Late planting of crops will cause shortages – Heather Chalmers:

Canterbury arable farmers will be hoping for favourable conditions in coming weeks to get a backlog of crops in the ground, months later than usual.

Record wet, boggy conditions in autumn prevented many farmers from planting autumn-sown cereals, with the delayed planting expected to impact on yields come harvest time, says Federated Farmers South Island grain and seed vice-chairman David Clark.

Farmers on heavy soils in the Mid-Canterbury districts of Eiffelton and Wakanui as well as parts of South Canterbury were unable to get machinery on to paddocks for autumn sowing. . .

Demo farm stays on course – Tim Cronshaw:

A lower milk payout will leave little “wiggle room” for the Lincoln University demonstration dairy farm to reach planned targets under its self-imposed tightening of nitrogen losses, following its bumper profit last season.

Under a milk payment of $8.40 a kilogram of milksolids the Lincoln University Dairy Farm achieved a record $1 million result in 2013-14. This result is after farm expenses were removed but is slightly skewed as it is a demonstration farm and normally some of this return would be taken by tax, investment capital, debt, drawings and dividends.

Another $100,000 would have been added had its managers not committed to limiting nitrogen losses. . .

Dairy production for China begins – Jasmine O’Donoghue:

Pactum Dairy Group (Pactum) and China’s Bright Dairy has begun initial production of U+, which is to be shipped to China as a part of the duo’s strategic supply agreement.

The 250mL dairy product U+, will be the first Australian based high quality dairy product manufactured for a major Chinese dairy company under its own brand.

U+ will be marketed on Australia’s reputation for high quality dairy product, and will be launched in China in August. . .

2015 ANZ Young Farmer Contest Season Opens:

Young Farmers from around the country will be sharpening their agricultural skills over the coming weeks and months as entries are now open for the 2015 season of the ANZ Young Farmer Contest.

The season is set to launch in Taupo Friday 3rd October with the first district final, Bay of Plenty, held Saturday 4th October in Tihoi.

District finals run from October to December and are the entry level for the ANZ Young Farmer Contest. Entry is open and free to all paid members of New Zealand Young Farmers between the ages of 15-31 (entrants must be under 31 years of age at 1st January 2015). Competition hopefuls can enter online at www.youngfarmers.co.nz . . .

It's over and out from national office for the weekend. Here's a Friday funny to put a smile on the dial :-)


Fantastic facts about the south # 42

August 10, 2014

Fantastic fact # 42:


Action Plan

August 10, 2014

action plan 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rules for making the world:

1. Stand up & do the thing you see needs doing.

2. That’s it. (If it was easy, we’d be having a different conversation.)

©2014 Brian Andreas – published with permission.

You can sign up for a daily dose of email whimsy like this by clicking on the link above.


70,000,000 reasons for sale

August 10, 2014

Tim Worstall, writing at Forbes, says there’s 70,000,000 reasons for selling Lochinver Station:

There’s a slightly bizarre argument going on over in New Zealand over the ownership of a large farm, Lochinver Station. The argument is over whether it’s right or not for it to be sold to a Chinese company. There’s so many things wrong with even having the debate that it’s difficult for we foreigners to get our minds around it. For a start the very definition of private property is that you can dispose of said property as you wish. If you can’t then it’s not actually private property any more. But more than that the basis of the argument against allowing the sale seems to be that the sale should be in New Zealand’s economic interest as a whole. Which, of course, it is, there’s 70 million benefits coming into the country in the form of the $70 million that’s being paid for it. Why the debate continues after this is a mystery. . .

The debate continues because of emotion and politics.

. . . To which I would just add that one about the 70 million benefits. A foreigner (a corporation, an individual, it doesn’t matter) is bringing money into the country to pay for Lochinver Station. The price that’s being paid is, by definition, everyone’s best guess as to the total current value of all of the future profits from that farming operation. This is thus an addition of $70 million to New Zealand’s capital stock. Before, there was the farm worth $70 million. After the sale there will still be the farm, which will still employ people, pay taxes and so on. And also the family operation that used to run the farm now has $70 million. The deal adds to the capital stock of the country and what makes a place richer is increasing the amount of capital that is added to the labour of that place. Thus there’s 70 million benefits to the sale, each dollar being paid over being a benefit of one dollar.

Other than a xenophobic appeal to economic populism (and those with long memories might care to ponder on where said autarkic populism led the economy under Robert Muldoon) there’s really nothing at all to support the idea that Lochinver Station cannot be sold to anyone at all who wants to buy it.

Private property rights and economics mean nothing to the xenophobes opposing the sale.

They also fail to see the benefits to the seller and the country from those $70,000,000 and all the other money the would-be purchaser, Shanghai Pengxin,  will have to put into the farm to meet the very strict criteria of the Overseas Investment Office.


Gap just 4% in poll of polls

August 10, 2014

Colin James is doing a poll of the four most recent polls each week until the election.

The first one shows that the gap between a National-led government and a Labour-led one is just 4%:

National’s polling average may have peaked during July at 52.5% in the four polls up to mid-July. By end-July it was at 50.3%. That is still a very healthy figure under MMP but if National sheds only 4% by election day, it cannot count on a third term, even with help from ACT, United Future and the Maori Party.

At the comparable time before the last election National was averaging around 56%. It dropped 9 percentage points from there to 47.3% at the election.

(The POLL of POLLS is an arithmetical average of the four most recent major polls, and will appear as a special series of election columns every Saturday on radionz.co.nz until after the election on September 20.)

james poll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This isn’t all bad news.

National’s continued high polling could have led to complacency from supporters who thought they didn’t need to vote or could afford to play with their party vote and from people who want National to win but not too well.

Another important election pointer also looks to have gone through a peak in July: Roy Morgan’s measure of whether people think the country is going in the right direction or the right direction. Those saying “right direction” were at 60% in late July, down from measures ranging from 63.5%-65.5% through the previous two months.

But that is still a very high reading. In a first-past-the-post election it would point to an easy re-election for an incumbent government. It is one reason why National continues to poll so highly.

 

This isn’t an FPP election and while the positive view of the direction the country is heading in is good for national it isn’t good enough for complacency.

The contrast between a stable government led by a strong National Party and an unstable government led by a weak Labour Party which gives lots of bargaining power to the ill-assorted parties they’d need to have on board is stark.

But there is still a lot of work to do to convince enough voters to do the right thing – in all senses of the word.

It might help if more people realise that David Cunliffe’s yeah-nahing over whether or not Internet Mana will be in a government he leads is just words which don’t speak nearly as loudly as the actions of his candidates:

 

mana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The marriage between Internet Mana and Labour which John Minto thinks is made in heaven  would be hell for New Zealand.


Sunday soapbox

August 10, 2014

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse.

 

Growing Bolder's photo.


August 10 in history

August 10, 2014

955 Battle of Lechfeld: Otto I, Holy Roman Emperor defeated the Magyars, ending 50 years of Magyar invasion of the West.

991 Battle of Maldon: English, led by Bryhtnoth, Duke of Essex, were defeated by a band of inland-raiding Vikings.

1270 Yekuno Amlak took the imperial throne of Ethiopia, restoring the Solomonic dynasty to power after a 100-year interregnum.

1316  Second Battle of Athenry.

1519 Ferdinand Magellan’s five ships set sail from Seville to circumnavigate the globe.

1557 Battle of St. Quentin: Spanish victory over the French in the Habsburg-Valois Wars.

1628 The Swedish warship Vasa sank in the Stockholm harbour after only about 20 minutes on her maiden voyage.

1675 The foundation stone of the Royal Greenwich Observatory in London was laid.

1680 The Pueblo Revolt began in New Mexico.

1792 French Revolution: Storming of the Tuileries Palace, Louis XVI was arrested.

1809 Quito declared independence from Spain.

1829 First ascent of Finsteraarhorn, the highest summit of the Bernese Alps.

1840 HMS Britomart arrived at Akaroa, on Banks Peninsula, a week before a shipload of French colonists landed. The ship’s captain raised the Union Jack to confirm British sovereignty over the area.

British assert sovereignty as French head for Akaroa

1846 The Smithsonian Institution was chartered by the United States Congress after James Smithson donated $500,000 for that purpose.

1861 American Civil War: Battle of Wilson’s Creek.

1901 The U.S. Steel Recognition Strike by the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers began.

1904 Russo-Japanese War: the Battle of the Yellow Sea.

1905 Russo-Japanese War: peace negotiations began in Portsmouth.

1913  Delegates from Bulgaria, Romania, Serbia, Montenegro, and Greece signed the Treaty of Bucharest, ending the Second Balkan War.

1920 World War I: Ottoman sultan Mehmed VI’s representatives signed the Treaty of Sèvres that divides the Ottoman Empire between the Allies.

1932 Rin Tin Tin, German shepherd dog, was born (b. 1918).

1932 A 5.1kg  chondrite-type meteorite broke into at least seven pieces and landed near Archie in Cass County, Missouri.

1940 Bobby Hatfield, American singer (The Righteous Brothers), was born (d. 2003).

1943 Jimmy Griffin, American guitarist (Bread), was born (d. 2005)

1944 World War II: American forces defeated the last Japanese troops on Guam.

1947  Ian Anderson, Scottish singer (Jethro Tull), was born.

1948 Candid Camera made its television debut after being on radio for a year as Candid Microphone.

1954 The groundbreaking ceremony for the Saint Lawrence Seaway was held.

1961  Jon Farriss, Australian musician (INXS).

1969 Members of Charles Manson‘s cult killed Leno and Rosemary LaBianca.

1977  David Berkowitz (“Son of Sam”) was arrested for a series of killings in the New York City area over the period of one year.

1988  U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, providing $20,000 payments to Japanese Americans who were either interned in or relocated by the United States during World War II.

1990  The Magellan space probe reached Venus.

1990 The Massacre of more than 127 Muslims in North East Sri Lanka by paramilitaries.

1993  An earthquake measuring 7.0 on the Richter Scale hit the South Island.

1995  Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols were indicted for Oklahoma City bombingMichael Fortier pleaded guilty in a plea-bargain agreement for his testimony.

1998 The Royal Proclamation of HRH Prince Al-Muhtadee Billah as the crown prince of Brunei.

2003 The highest temperature ever recorded in the UK – 38.5°C (101.3°F) in Kent.

2003 – Yuri Malenchenko became the first person to marry in space.

2006  Scotland Yard disrupted major terrorist plot to destroy aircraft travelling from the United Kingdom to the United States. In the wake of this all toiletries were banned from commercial airplanes.

2009 – Twenty people were killed in Handlová, Trenčín Region, in the deadliest mining disaster in Slovakia’s history.

2012 – The Marikana miners’ strike began near Rustenburg, South Africa.

2013 – The World Championships in Athletics took place in Moscow.

 

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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