Craig’s injunction blocks debate

August 8, 2014

Colin Craig has won an interim injunction against TV3 after it refused to include him in a debate between leaders of the minor parties:

. . . Leaders from ACT, United Future, the Greens, the Maori Party, NZ First and Mana are scheduled to appear in the 34-minute debate. 

“The debate this weekend is part of a series of more targeted debates running on The Nation, and involves minor parties who have seats in Parliament and have been in Government or Opposition during the past three years,” a TV3 spokesperson said this morning. 

Mr Craig’s lawyer, John McKay, said his client had been excluded from a “vital part of democracy”.  

“It’s about voters,” Mr McKay told the court.

He said it was “extraordinary that TV3 had chosen leaders to appear on the debate based on their place in Parliament from the last election, rather than current polls”. 

Part of the issue was the show’s studio could only accommodate six lecterns for leaders, not seven, meaning there wouldn’t be enough space for Mr Craig. A wide shot can also only accommodate six people, as can the studio’s lighting. 

“There must be a trade-off between comfort and the importance of the occasion,” Mr McKay argued. 

TV3 lawyer Daniel McLellan acknowledged Mr Craig had a right to be included in televised debates in the heat of the election campaign, but tomorrow’s minor debate was not that important. 

Mr McLellan said it was “not likely to have a significant impact on the 2014 general election”, and media have a right to decided what is newsworthy without having it “dictated” to them. . .

I don’t like the idea of politicians dictating what media does and how it does.

But when TV3’s lawyer admitted Craig had a right to be included he weakened his case for his exclusions considerably.

It might only be political tragics who are fully engaged in the election campaign.

But it is only six weeks to polling day.


Word of the day

August 8, 2014

Formicate to crawl around like ants’ to swarm with ants or other crawling creatures.


Rural round-up

August 8, 2014

 Anti-foreigner stance ‘short-sighted’:

A New Zealand farming leader says he’s frustrated that a range of political parties are targetting foreigners and saying they shouldn’t be allowed to buy farms.

Federated Farmers vice president Anders Crofoot bought Castlepoint Station in Wairarapa after moving to New Zealand from the United States in the 1990s and went through the Overseas Investment Commission to do so.

The Labour Party has said that if it wins the general election sales of rural land to most foreigners will be banned. . .

Dairy farm purchase boosts employment

The purchase of a North Otago dairy farm by a company founded by a South Canterbury businessman will create more local jobs, the company says.

Craigmore Sustainables has received Overseas Investment Office approval to purchase a dairy farm in Tussocky Rd, months after buying three other farms in North Otago.

Craigmore is the brainchild of South Canterbury businessman and farmer Forbes Elworthy and is based in London. It also has offices around New Zealand.

“We have an extensive development programme in place for this property, including building a dairy shed, new effluent system, and native planting to assist with nutrient management,” the company’s director of commercial development, Hamish Blackman, said. . .

Lochinver owners want sale money for development – Patrick Gower:

The Kiwi seller of Lochinver Station is a century-old Kiwi business and wants to use the $70 million for a major property development that will help the expansion of Auckland.

Sir William Stevenson was the driving force behind his family’s business empire. He bought Lochinver Station 60 years ago, turning it from a vast wasteland into thriving farmland with 100,000 sheep.

Now, the family’s attempt to sell could be blocked by politics. Sir William’s friend Morrin Cooper says he wouldn’t like that.

“The Stevenson family deserve better than this: to be used as a chopping block just because there happens to be an election around the corner.” . . .

Trade talks failure may cost NZ in Korea:

The Agricultural Trade Envoy, Mike Petersen, is warning that farmers are in danger of losing out in the lucrative South Korean markets if trade talks fail.

The latest round of negotiations have been taking place in Seoul this week.

Last week the Minister for Trade, Tim Groser said he had given his final offer to the Koreans to resolve issues such as easing tariffs for New Zealand’s farmers, which cost exporters $195 million a year. . .

In lean times, it’s still vital to look after your workers – Chris Lewis:

The buzz about town is the revised pay-outs announced by Fonterra and Westland, which have both dropped significantly. So the pressure will be mounting this spring as farmers try to keep their heads above water. In times like these it is important to run a tight ship, not only financially but with your staff.

Stress has a way of brushing off onto those near you so look after yourself and bear a thought for your staff and your family who will not be immune to the pressure. A farm has many different aspects to it and a well cared for and oiled machine will ride out the tough times a lot smoother than one that has been roughing it or neglecting it. . .

Farmers take over yarn mill – Alan Wood:

Wool farmers have an agreement in place to buy a Christchurch yarn mill, describing the deal as a “significant” industry event to supply the carpet manufacturing industry.

Christchurch Yarns NZ went into receivership in April with the high kiwi dollar one of the challenges the business was up against at that time.

The dollar has remained stubbornly high since then and yesterday was trading around US84 cents and A90 cents.

The business was originally Christchurch Carpet Yarns and has its production facility based at a leased Sheffield Cres, Harewood property near Canterbury Technology park. . .

$3m grant boosts agri chemical research – Sue O’Dowd:

Research funding will help a Taranaki chemical-manufacturing company develop products its customers want.

Zelam is one of 52 Taranaki businesses to have received government research grants in the past three years to help them take their ideas for products and services to market.

For the next five years 20 per cent of Zelam’s eligible research costs will be refunded by Callaghan Innovation, a government agency that provides money to businesses that invest in research and development. Each year Zelam invests up to $3 million in chemistry and field trials. . .

"LA PRODUCCIÓN AGROPECUARIA EMPUJA TODA LA ECONOMÍA" Pepe Mujica – Presidente de Uruguay “No estoy de acuerdo con el dejo peyorativo, muy urbanizado, de creer que el campo es estático, que no hay progreso tecnológico ni inversión técnica. Eso es no conocer al país y, quien no lo conoce, no puede quererlo. Y es lo que más me duele”. “La producción agropecuaria empuja a toda la economía y encadena una masa laboral y de energía por los insumos que consume, los apoyos que necesita y el transporte” que requiere, aseguró el presidente oriental. Mujica explicó que las naciones avanzadas son aquellas que producen un bien al menor costo posible para venderlo al mayor valor posible. “ En cuanto al concepto de “valor agregado”, Mujica dijo que, más que la naturaleza del producto en cuestión, es necesario “tener claro cuál es el conjunto tecnológico que hay atrás para llegar a ese producto: es mucho más complejo el (mero) concepto de industrializar”. COMPARTÍ si estás de acuerdo con Pepe Mujica sobre su opinión del sector agropecuario.

The future is in the country.


#teamkey becomes #teamski

August 8, 2014

Campaigning in winter isn’t always easy.

But National’s Dunedin South candidate Hamish Walker isn’t going to let a little snow get in the way of proving to voters that the party is working for New Zealand whatever the weather:
Commitment for team key on skis. #teamski

#teamkey is also #teamski


Friday’s answers

August 8, 2014

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.?

2.  What is an anthophila more commonly known as?

3. It’s miel in French, miele in Italian,  miel in Spanish and too easy in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What is a nectavore?

5. Is your favourite toast-topping sweet or savoury?

Points for answers:

Andrei and David both win an electronic batch of ricebubble honey suckle square (recipe below answers) for a clean sweep.

J Bloggs gets three, a bonus for humour for # 4  and a nearly for # 2 – bees are flower-lovers but I think you were thinking of anthophilia with an i before the final a not anthophila.

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Fantastic facts about the south # 44

August 8, 2014

Fantastic fact # 44:


Green for stop

August 8, 2014

Green is usually the colour for go but in politics it’s the colour for stop:

Transport Minister Gerry Brownlee says the Green Party owes it to New Zealanders to identify which State highway projects would not proceed under its just released transport policy.

“With $11 billion removed from planned State highway projects, it’s hard not to conclude it’s all of them,” Mr Brownlee says.

97 per cent of New Zealand’s passenger travel and 91 per cent of freight movement is done on the roads.

“The National Government supports public transport and has provided $2.4 billion over the past five years. With the local government contribution that is $3.5 billion spent on public transport, including commuter rail investment in Auckland and Wellington.

“The Green Party needs to explain which of the following roading projects it would axe first, or if it’s all of them:

Northland (Puhoi – Wellsford: $1.38 billion, Akerama Curves Realignment & Passing Lane: $10-$13.5 million, Loop Rd North to Smeatons Hill Safety Improvements: $15-$20 million).

Auckland (Western Ring Route: $2 billion, Northern Corridor: $450 million, Southern Corridor: $210 million, State Highway 20A to the Airport: $140 million, East West Link: $10 million investigation).

Bay of Plenty (Tauranga Eastern Link: $500 million, Rotorua Eastern Arterial investigation).

Waikato (Waikato Expressway: $1.9 billion).

Taranaki (Normanby Overbridge Realignment: $10-$15 million, Mt Messenger and Awakino Gorge Corridor: $20-$25 million).

Gisborne (Panikau Hill and Wallace Hill Slow Vehicle Bays: $1.2-$1.5 million, Motu Bridge Replacement:  $3-$5 million).

Hawkes Bay (Napier port access package investigation).

Manawatu (Whirokino Trestle Bridge Replacement: $25-$30 million).

Wellington (Wellington Northern Corridor, includes Transmission Gully: $2.1 – 2.4 billion).

Nelson (Nelson Southern Link investigation).

Marlborough (Opawa and Wairau Bridges Replacement: $20-$25 million).

West Coast (Taramakau Road/Rail Bridge: $10-$15 million).

Canterbury (Christchurch Motorways: $730 million, Mingha Bluff to Rough Creek realignment: $20-$25 million).

Otago (Kawarau Falls Bridge:$20-$25 million).

“The Greens also propose to cut local road spending by over half a billion dollars, putting pressure on our communities and compromising safety.

“Since being elected in 2008 the National Government has been rectifying a 30 year deficit in road transport infrastructure. The Green Party proposal would put us back by decades.

“The National Government has a balanced land transport policy (www.transport.govt.nz/gps) which gives commuters choice in the modes they use to travel and helps businesses to choose the most efficient way of getting their goods to domestic and international markets,” Mr Brownlee says.

 The Green’s transport policy shows it’s anti-progress and anti transport.

It also shows how disconnected it is from provincial and rural New Zealand.

The road improvements it would stop are vital links within and between provinces.

They carry people, emergency services, stock and produce as well as tourists all of which are important for the social and economic well-being of the communities they link.

The only go about the Green transport is the progress which would go away if their policies were implemented.


Grass greener here

August 8, 2014

For too many years the grass has been greener on the other side of the Tasman.

But the tide has turned:

JOE Hockey frequently admits he’s a little bit jealous of our cousins across the ditch, in an economic sense at least.

THE treasurer’s green eye probably went an even deeper shade of emerald after New Zealand’s latest employment figures showed their jobless rate tumbled to a five-year low of 5.6 per cent in the June quarter from a revised 5.9 per cent previously.

The best we can hope for is Australia’s jobless rate not reaching 6.25 per cent this financial year, as predicted in Mr Hockey’s May budget. Australia’s labour force figures for July are released on Thursday and are forecast to show a solid 12,000 rise in the number of people of employed. However, economists say this won’t be enough to cut into the unemployment rate, which is expected to stay at six per cent. . .

He said New Zealand has stolen the advantage from Australia during the past few years by combining domestic structural reforms with newly negotiated trade opportunities in Asia. “As a result, they have falling unemployment, rising living standards and a budget that is coming into surplus,” Mr Hockey said. Faced with a hostile Senate over his first budget, Mr Hockey also said he was “quite jealous” that NZ Prime Minister John Key has to deal with only one parliamentary chamber. Even so, Mr Key and Finance Minister Bill English are showing the world how economic reform should be done. And it has not been achieved through “luck or complacency”. “There is no she’ll-be-right attitude,” Mr Hockey said. . . 

“Now is the time to fix our budget,” he said. “By creating an environment where businesses can grow and succeed, we will improve both the quantity and the quality of jobs available for ourselves, and ultimately for our children.” . . .

The gains New Zealand has made under two National-led governments are the result of policies which recognise the importance of economic growth as the foundation for sustainable progress.

National is lowering the burden of government and addressing deep-seated and expensive problems including welfare dependency.

A third term would enable these policies to really bed in and achieve further progress.

A change of government to one led by a weak Labour party propped up by the Green, New Zealand First and Internet Mana parties would undo much of the good that has been so hard-won and take us backwards.


110% yeah-nah

August 8, 2014

David Cunliffe still can’t give a clear yes or no on whether he’d deal with Internet Mana Party:

He says he wants voters to give Kelvin Davis two ticks but then Paul Henry asks about IMP  and says: (6:45):

“. . . You can do something about this.

No-one else in politics can do this. You can stop that party from getting in by thoroughly supporting Kelvin Davis . . .”

They then talk over each other and Cunliffe says:

” . .  110% we want to win that seat. . . “

But watch the wriggle room he leaves next when Henry says:

“You want Internet Mana out?”

Cunliffe replies:

“I wanna win that seat. . . “

That sounds like a yes but it isn’t a straight no.

It’s 110% yeah-nah, again.

He’s 110% sure he wants to be Prime Minister and if having IMP in his government is the only way that will happen we can be 110% sure it will be.

 

 

 


How low can Harre go?

August 8, 2014

Laila Harre’s blindness to the hypocrisy of  having her attempt to return to parliament funded by Kim Dotcom whose actions and principles are the antithesis of just about everything she’s ever stood for confirmed the low view many have of  politics and politicians.

Her attempt to justify the Internet Mana advertisement in which a crowd of young people shout F*** John Key takes politics down several more notches.

“Offence to who?” she says. “Young people have their right to have their voice heard.”

What’s happened to balancing the right to be heard with the responsibility to say something worth hearing in an acceptable manner?

“That will confirm what a lot of New Zealanders think of the guy,” says John Key. “In the end it’s a matter for him how he wants to run Internet Mana’s campaign .” 

Dotcom appears to want to run politics in the gutter and Harre is down there with him.

Earlier Massey University political marketing specialist Claire Robinson said the video cut down Ms Harre just as she was trying to claim the moral high ground.

“Laila Harre was expressing such indignation about John Key’s ‘sugar-daddy’ comment and the need for respect in the political debate, and at the same time you have Kim Dotcom posting a video inciting hate speech, in effect, among a crowd of young people.

“It is sinking to such a low, and completely at odds with what she’s trying to do, exposing yet again the enormous disconnect between Kim Dotcom’s hatred for John Key and the way that she wants to campaign. . .

But Harre was blind to the disconnect:

Ms Harre said she had no problem with the video, adding that it was a spontaneous reaction and Kim Dotcom did not lead the chant.

“The video is a true representation of youth expression. We are on the road to engage with young people over politics. We are not about censoring the way that young people engage.” . . .

It wasn’t a spontaneous chant and it wasn’t a one-off. It happened on at least one other occasion and it was orchestrated by IMP staff:

Is it any wonder that so many are disillusioned by politics and politicians when it’s sunk to this level?

Mindless and personal denigration is a long way from political discourse and it might also be a breach of advertising standards:

Family First NZ has laid an official complaint with the Advertising Standards Authority over the Internet Mana party’s ‘Join the Revolution’ advert on YouTube which includes a crowd chanting “f*** John Key”.

“Internet Mana is dragging political debate to a new low level. We really are in trouble as a country when a political advertisement is deemed appropriate when it simply denigrates another political leader in an offensive fashion,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.

“Political parties should show social responsibility and observe taste and decency – especially as they seek to engage families in the political campaign.”

“New Zealanders want robust and respectful debate of the issues – not personal offensive attacks,” says Mr McCoskrie.

“Advertising standards also says that ‘advertisements should not portray people in a manner which is reasonably likely to cause serious or widespread hostility, contempt, abuse or ridicule’ and ‘should not contain anything which in the light of generally prevailing community standards is likely to cause serious or widespread offence.’

“The party’s advertisement is not advocacy. It is personal denigration, and Internet Mana needs to find a better advertising agency.”

It needs to find some better principles and standards too.


August 8 in history

August 8, 2014

1220 Sweden  was defeated by Estonian tribes in the Battle of Lihula.

1503  King James IV of Scotland married Margaret Tudor.

1509  The Emperor Krishnadeva Raya was crowned, marking the beginning of the regeneration of the Vijayanagara Empire.

1576  The cornerstone for Tycho Brahe’s Uraniborg observatory was laid on Hven.

1588  Anglo-Spanish War: Battle of Gravelines – The naval engagement ended, ending the Spanish Armada’s attempt to invade England.

1647  Battle of Dungans Hill – English Parliamentary forces defeated Irish forces.

1709  Bartolomeu de Gusmão demonstrated the lifting power of hot air in an audience before the King of Portugal.

1786  Mont Blanc was climbed for the first time by Jacques Balmat and Dr Michel-Gabriel Paccard.

1793 The insurrection of Lyon.

1794 Joseph Whidbey and George Vancouver led an expedition to search for the Northwest Passage near Juneau, Alaska.

1870 The Republic of Ploieşti, a failed Radical-Liberal rising against Domnitor Carol of Romania.

1876  Thomas Edison received a patent for his mimeograph.

1879 Bob Smith, American founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, was born (d. 1950).

1889 – Jack Ryder, Australian cricketer, was born (d. 1977).

1908 Wilbur Wright made his first flight at a racecourse at Le Mans.

1910  The US Army installed the first tricycle landing gear on the Army’s Wright Flyer.

1911 The millionth patent was filed in the United States Patent Office by Francis Holton for a tubeless vehicle tire.

1915 The Wellington Battallion captured Chunuk Bair.

Wellington Battalion captures Chunuk Bair

1918  Battle of Amiens began a string of almost continuous victories with a push through the German front lines (Hundred Days Offensive).

1929 Ronald Biggs, British Great Train robber, was born.

1929  The German airship Graf Zeppelin began a round-the-world flight.

1932 – Luis García Meza Tejada, Bolivian general and politician, 68th President of Bolivia

1937 Dustin Hoffman, American actor, was born.

1940 The “Aufbau Ost” directive was signed by Wilhelm Keitel.

1942 In Washington, DC, six German would-be saboteurs (Operation Pastorius) were executed.

1942  The Quit India resolution was passed by the Bombay session of the AICC, leading to the start of a civil disobedience movement across India.

1945 The Soviet Union declared war on Japan and began the Manchurian Strategic Offensive Operation.

1946  First flight of the Convair B-36.

1947 Pakistan’s National Flag was approved.

1949  Bhutan became independent.

1950 Ken Kutaragi, Founder of PlayStation, was born.

1961 The Edge, (Favid Evans) Irish guitarist (U2), was born.

1963 Great Train Robbery: a gang of 15 train robbers stole 2.6 million pounds in bank notes.

1967 The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was founded by Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand.

1968 Jurō Wada successfully performed Japan’s first heart transplant.

1973 – Kim Dae-Jung, a South Korean politician and later president, was kidnapped.

1974  Watergate scandal: U.S. President Richard Nixon announced his resignation, effective the next day.

1980  The Central Hotel Fire, Bundoran , Ireland.

1988  The “8888 Uprising” in Burma.

1989    STS-28 Mission – Space Shuttle Columbia took off on a secret five-day military mission.

1990  Iraq occupied  Kuwait and the state was annexed to Iraq.

1991  The Warsaw radio mast, at one time the tallest construction ever built, collapsed.

1991  John McCarthy, British journalist held hostage in Lebanon for more than five years by Islamic Jihad, was released.

2000  Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley was raised to the surface after 136 years on the ocean floor.

2007 An EF2 tornado touched down in Kings County and Richmond County, New York State, the most powerful tornado in New York to date and the first in Brooklyn since 1889.

2010 –  A mudslide in Zhugqu County, Gansu, China, killed more than 1,400 people.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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