Riverstone features in Cuisine awards again

June 10, 2014

Riverstone Kitchen, the first regional restaurant to win Cuisine’s restaurant of the year, features in the awards again this year as runner-up for the regional award.

Auckland fine-diner Sidart is Cuisine’s Restaurant of the Year 2014, heading off a string of strong contenders in the highest restaurant count in the 10-year history of the awards.

Winners of the prestigious Cuisine NZ Good Food Awards, held in association with Vittoria Coffee, were announced last night at a glitzy who’s who of the restaurant industry at St-Matthew-in-the-City.

Sidart also took out the title of Sanpellegrino Best Metropolitan Restaurant, with head judge Kerry Tyack describing the degustation-only menu of inspirational and innovative chef Sid Sahrawat as “art on a plate”.

The picture-perfect presentation of superbly flavoured dishes, a complementary drinks list and seamless service made dining at Sidart an experience to be savoured in every way, Tyack says. “Good chefs never stand still – they continuously experiment, evolve and adjust. Over the past year, Sid Sahrawat’s food at Sidart has come into its own and truly excelled.”

Adds Cuisine editor Sarah Nicholson, “This year it’s been tougher than ever before to create a dining experience that stands out from the exceptional group of restaurants in New Zealand. Sid Sahrawat’s food is clever and technical, and looks amazing, but at the end of the day it is absolutely delicious, and that is the most important thing.”

Sixteen new eateries made the cut in the nationwide awards this year, with the total number of coveted chef’s hats increasing to 30 from 2013’s twenty.

The Grove, plus its buzzing new Italian offspring Baduzzi, earned executive chef Benjamin Bayly the title of Vittoria Coffee Chef of the Year. Baduzzi was crowned American Express Best Specialist Restaurant, with Wellington’s popular Ortega Fish Shack & Bar the runner-up.

Nic Watts’ chic Japanese eatery Masu at Auckland’s SkyCity was named Electrolux Best New Restaurant, with the intimate Roots in Lyttelton as runner-up.

The KitchenAid Best Regional Restaurant title went to the smart, laid-back Chim Choo Ree in Hamilton, with North Otago’s awards stalwart Riverstone Kitchen the runner-up. The House of Travel Best Winery Restaurant was Hawke’s Bay’s elegant Elephant Hill, with Central Otago’s picturesque Amisfield Bistro the runner-up.

Proprietor Chris Upton’s long-standing dedication to wine service earned Auckland’s O’Connell Street Bistro the Negociants New Zealand Best Wine Experience award, a new category this year, and the captivating Mojo Horiuchi, manager-sommelier at Auckland’s Kazuya, was named European Foods Restaurant Personality of the Year.

Find full profiles of the winners and other successful restaurants in the Cuisine NZ Good Food Awards 2014 on cuisinegoodfoodguide.co.nz, or get the Cuisine Good Food Guide 2014 free with the July issue of Cuisine, on sale 16 June 2014.

Cuisine NZ Good Food Awards 2014 winners:

RESTAURANT OF THE YEAR 2014: Sidart, Auckland

Vittoria Coffee Chef of the Year: Benjamin Bayly, Baduzzi and The Grove, Auckland

Sanpellegrino Best Metropolitan Restaurant: Sidart, Auckland

KitchenAid Best Regional Restaurant: Chim Choo Ree, Hamilton
Runner-up: Riverstone Kitchen, North Otago

Electrolux Best New Restaurant: Masu, Auckland
Runner-up: Roots, Lyttelton

American Express Best Specialist Restaurant: Baduzzi, Auckland
Runner-up: Ortega Fish Shack & Bar, Wellington

House of Travel Best Winery Restaurant: Elephant Hill, Hawke’s Bay
Runner-up: Amisfield Bistro, Central Otago

European Foods Restaurant Personality of the Year: Mojo Horiuchi, Kazuya, Auckland

Negociants New Zealand Best Wine Experience: O’Connell Street Bistro, Auckland

2014 Hat recipients
Scores out of 20 determine a restaurant’s hat rating. One hat is considered very good, two hats are great to excellent and three hats (18-20) mean a restaurant is consistently amazing and among the best of the best.

3 HATS
Clooney, Auckland
Sidart, Auckland
The French Café, Auckland
The Grove, Auckland

2 HATS
Baduzzi, Auckland
Kazuya, Auckland
Logan Brown, Wellington
Masu, Auckland
Merediths, Auckland
The Grill by Sean Connolly, Auckland

1 HAT
Amisfield Bistro, Queenstown
Bracu, Auckland
Cazador, Auckland
Charley Noble, Wellington
Chim Choo Ree, Hamilton
Depot, Auckland
Elephant Hill, Hawke’s Bay
O’Connell Street Bistro, Auckland
Orphans Kitchen, Auckland
Ortega Fish Shack & Bar, Wellington
Ortolana, Auckland
Pegasus Bay, Waipara, North Canterbury
Pescatore, Christchurch
Ponsonby Road Bistro, Auckland
Rata, Otago
Riverstone Kitchen, Oamaru
Roots, Christchurch
Soul Bar & Bistro, Auckland
Taylors on Jackson, Petone
The Larder, Wellington

One of the benefits of tourism and provincial development is the improvement in the quality of food in smaller towns.

In North Otago we’ve got Riverstone Kitchen just north of Oamaru,  Fleurs Place at Moeraki to the south and in Oamaru for the finest of dining there’s Pen-y-Bryn Lodge.

Portside, at the harbour and Northstar are also worth a visit and for more casual dining Fat Sally’s is also good.

There’s others featured here.


Politics Daily

June 10, 2014

IMF report

Bill English – IMF report backs NZ’s economic progress

TV3 – NZ given tick by IMF

Jonathan Underhill @ NBR – China slowdown, weaker commodity prices, drop in house prices biggest risks to NZ: IMF

Manufacturing

Inventory 2 @ Keeping Stock – Manufacturing still in crisis. Yeah right.

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – Labour’s Manufacturing Crisis just keeps crisising along

Beehive

Bill English & Steven Joyce – Business Growth Agenda boosting investment, jobs & growth

Steven Joyce – Encouraging sole parents into higher study

Murray McCully – Whaling comments “worrying”

Judith Collins – New MOU signed to improve family justice

Craig Foss – Going Digital on time and under budget

Quake Court

Kloe Palmer @ TV3 – National: Labour’s quake court poorly considered

Mike Hosking @ NewstalkZB – Issues with Earthquake Court plan

The Press – Labour’s bold Canterbury policy

Derek Cheng @ NZ Herald –  Insurance Council rejects Labour’s ‘Earthquake Court’

Election

Inventory 2 @ Keeping Stock – Tweet of the Day – 10 June 2014

Scrubone @ Something Should Go Here Maybe Later – Reminder all politicians play games

Phil Quin @ Pundit – How Internet Mana could help National reach 50%

Patrick Leyland @ The NZ Progress Report – NZ Facebook pages

Pete George @ Your NZ – Craig’s Conservatives cold shouldered

Peter Cullen @ Stuff Fixed-term payouts when ministers gets marched

Pattrick Smellie @ NBR – Coat-tail deals ‘a few weeks away’, says Key

Lew @ Kiwi Politico – Doubloons

Peter George @ Your NZ – Green election prospects

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – Green Hypocrisy on Coat-tailing and strategic voting

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – More trouble amongst the alliance partners

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – A reader emails about the so-called “missing million”

Dominion Post – Nats don’t need another tea party

Campaign funding

Stacey Kirk @ – Campaign funding allocations ‘unfair

Taxpayers’ Union – Civilian Party Surely Playing Practical Joke

Hannah Herchenbach@ The Press – Civilian Party leader: Criticism ‘dishonest’

Electoral Prosecutions

David Farrar @ Kiwiblog – Police electoral prosecutions

NZ Herald – Investigation into police needed over Banks case

The Press –  Banks faces political reality

Bryce Edwards @ NBR – NZ POLITICS DAILY: The impact of John Banks on the election campaign

Liam Hehir @ Manawatu Standard – Redemption never impossible

Labour

Chris Trotter @ Bowalley Road – Labour’s Caucus Still In Charge

David Farrar @ Kiwiblog – Smith on Labour

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – Mike Smith – On Labour’s Mantra of Misery

IMP

Inventory 2 @ Keeping Stock – Cash for credibility

Other

ACT – The Letter

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – ACT’s Letter on Banks and Hone

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – Uh oh, the Greens aren’t buying Cunliffe’s dog whistle either

Dominion Post – Today in Politics Tuesday June 10

Matthew Beveridge – Tweet MPs

ODT – Fraction too much friction

David Farrar @ Kwiblog – NZ Public poll methodologies

Dominion Post – Today in Politics: Tuesday, June 10


Word of the day

June 10, 2014

Apostasy – the abandonment or renunciation of a religious or political belief or principle; a total desertion of or departure from one’s religion, principles, party, or cause;  political revolt or defection.


Rural round-up

June 10, 2014

More qualifications needed in future:

A new report released by the Ministry for Primary Industries indicates a lot more people in the sector are going to have to have a tertiary qualification if they hope to take advantage of a predicted 15 percent increase in jobs by 2025.

MPI manager of science and skills policy Naomi Parker said even roles that traditionally did not require post secondary school qualifications would do so in future because of the increasing reliance on technology. . . .

Eradicating TB from Rangitoto enhances biodiversity:

TBfree New Zealand is working with environmental groups to stamp out pests in the Rangitoto Range to control bovine tuberculosis (TB) and bring the birds back.

The Hauhungaroa and Rangitoto ranges make up a part of New Zealand’s 10 million hectare TB risk area in which TB-infected wild animals have been found.

The objective of the national pest management plan is to eradicate the disease from at least 2.5 million hectares of the country’s total TB risk area by 2026. TBfree New Zealand aims to eradicate the disease from the Rangitoto Range as part of this plan. . . .

Water and governance under scrutiny at Massey:

Framing new ways for organisations to collaborate over controversial decisions, such as water use, is the focus of a Massey University symposium involving some of New Zealand’s key leaders in governance.

The July 8 symposium, Redefining Governance for the new New Zealand, brings together a diverse range of experts and thought leaders with experience in governance.

Speakers and panellists include Alastair Bisley (chair of the Land and Water
orum), Suzanne Snivelly (economic strategist), David Shand (public sector reformer and a member of the Royal Commission on Auckland Governance), Grant Taylor (Auckland Council’s governance director), and Dave Hansford (award-winning photographer and environmental journalist). . . .

Fonterra Appoints MD Global Operations:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited announced today the appointment of Robert Spurway to the role of Managing Director Global Operations, a newly-created position on Fonterra’s management team.

Chief Executive Theo Spierings said Mr Spurway was uniquely qualified for the position.

“Robert is currently Acting Director New Zealand Operations in NZ Milk Products, responsible for overseeing milk collection, manufacturing and logistics for the Co-operative’s New Zealand milk supply.

“One of our top business priorities is to optimise our global ingredients sales and operations footprint, so we can better manage price volatility and increase value, while ensuring a total focus on food safety and quality, and our customers’ needs. . .

 

 Technology to top farmers’ shopping list:

Agricultural Fieldays 2014 will be a measure of how the agribusiness sector is gearing up to capitalise on growing export opportunities, according to New Zealand’s largest agricultural lender, ANZ New Zealand.

“With an economic recovery in full swing and growing export demand for New Zealand agricultural products, the scene is set for farmers to again invest in the technology that will drive productivity,” said Graham Turley, ANZ’s Managing Director Commercial & Agri.

“Agri-business is New Zealand’s most productive and successful business sector and it achieves this through ongoing investment in market leading technology. Agri businesses are only as successful as they are because they constantly innovate. . .

 

Hottest new dairy technology designed in New Zealand:

Technology designed to bring the power of intelligent communication and unprecedented future proofing to dairy farmers’ milking systems will be highlighted at National Fieldays.

The product in the spotlight at this year’s show (11-14 June) on the Waikato Milking Systems stand is a newly designed product known as the Bail Marshal.

The New Zealand owned company’s Chief Executive Dean Bell says the innovative product has been designed to enable all technology devices on a milking system to work together seamlessly and continually communicate with each other. . . .

Sharp Blacks Get Ready for the Tri-Nations:

 

Pure South Sharp Blacks

Our national butchery team diced up their final practice yesterday proving they have got what it takes to defend their title against Australia and England next month.
This year our team of six top butchers, the Pure South Sharp Blacks, travel to Yorkshire, England to compete in the Tri-Nations Butchers’ Challenge.

After many months of refining their skill, the Pure South Sharp Blacks performance at their last practice, held at Wilson Hellaby in Auckland, has confirmed just how promising our national team is. . .

Ambitious Butchers Make the Cut:

The Alto Young Butcher and Competenz Butcher Apprentice of the Year is well underway with the Lower North Island Regional held yesterday in Palmerston North.

The Alto Young Butcher winner Alex Harper of The Village Butcher in Frimley, Hastings and Competenz Butcher Apprentice winner Amy Jones of New World Taumarunui have successfully secured their place to challenge some of the finest butchery talent in the country at the Grand Final in September.

Alex and Amy’s motivations are high with a study tour around Europe up for grabs if they are successful in the next stage of the competition. . . .

A taste of New Zealand in Dubai, Taiwan and Singapore:

New Zealand Trade and Enterprise has been giving the world a taste of New Zealand.

In Dubai, New Zealand was centre stage for the 2014 Taste New Zealand chef competition. Targeted at professional chefs, the competition aims to raise awareness of the diversity and quality of New Zealand food and drink products available in the United Arab Emirates amongst chefs, buyers, and food service and retail industry leaders. Last year, the competition helped NZTE customers secure $4 million in new deals. . . .


Tractor not ideal get-away vehicle

June 10, 2014

Police think two men they were pursuing have used a stolen tractor as a get-away vehicle:

. . . Police were pursuing two men in a car in Te Aroha at 11pm on Monday night when their vehicle crashed into a paddock.

The two men fled and officers were unable to find them despite using search dogs.

On Tuesday morning at 7am a local farmer reported his John Deere tractor was missing. . . .

The average tractor is big and slow-moving which isn’t what’s normally wanted a get-away vehicle.

 


IMF backs NZ progress

June 10, 2014

The IMF is backing New Zealand’s progress:

New Zealand should expect strong and increasingly broad-based economic growth, according to the International Monetary Fund’s latest report on New Zealand, published today.

The IMF is forecasting annual economic growth in New Zealand to peak at 3.5 per cent next year and not fall below 2.5 per cent over the next few years.  This growth will be driven by strong construction activity, higher prices for exports and increases in net migration.

“This is the latest in a series of encouraging reports on the New Zealand economy, which confirms that we are well placed compared with most other developed countries,” Mr English says.

“The IMF highlights the importance of getting the Government’s books back to surplus to help the Reserve Bank keep interest rates lower for longer. Under the previous government, excessive spending, alongside the booming housing market, contributed to floating mortgage interest rates reaching almost 11 per cent.

“A range of indicators points to broad-based growth in the economy. Building consents in March were nearly double the number issued three years ago. Business confidence remains near 20-year highs. And employment figures showed 84,000 more jobs in the year to March – the largest annual increase in employment since 2004.

“Sticking to our responsible economic management will help ensure Budget forecasts for strong economic growth, average wage increases of $7,600 by 2018, and unemployment falling to 4.4 per cent, all occur.”

The IMF is expecting New Zealand’s current account deficit to increase to around 6 per cent of GDP by 2016 – still well below the levels seen in the mid-2000s.  

“Although this longstanding imbalance remains a vulnerability, the latest figures are encouraging with Statistics New Zealand showing the current account deficit at 3.4 per cent of GDP,” Mr English says.

“Getting on top of Government spending to keep interest rates down and promote broad-based economic growth is a key plank of that improvement.

“Overall, the IMF report confirms the Government’s economic programme is taking New Zealand’s economy in the right direction,” Mr English says.

“This is the best way to support jobs and raise New Zealanders’ living standards.”

Economic progress is not just important, it’s necessary if we also want sustainable environmental and social progress.

 The IMF report says:

1. Economic developments. The economic expansion is becoming increasingly embedded and broad-based, with growth exceeding 3 percent in the second half of 2013, somewhat stronger than expected. The drivers include supportive financial conditions, record high export commodity prices, resurgent construction activity related to the Canterbury post-earthquake rebuild and general housing shortages, and a substantial increase in net immigration (text figures). Business and consumer confidence indicators have risen to the hi ghest levels since the global financial crisis. The labor market continues to strengthen with the unemployment rate falling to 6 percent (Figure 1). Strong terms of trade have narrowed the 2013 current account deficit to 3¼ percent of GDP and have contributed to the elevated New Zealand dollar, which continues to hold back growth in the non-agricultural tradeable goods sector. With the high exchange rate damping tradable price inflation, headline inflation has remained below the mid-point of the target band (Figure 2). Nominal wage inflation has so far remained subdued.  . . .

3. Fiscal developments. Supported by healthy output growth the government’s aim of reducing the budget deficit is going according to pl an. The deficit is currently projected to decline almost ½ percent of GDOP to less than ½ percent of GDP this year due to restraint in expenditure growth. 1 The plan would reduce public debt from it s peak of 26 percent of GDP in 2013 to about 20 percent by 2018. The government just concluded selling stakes in state-owned enterprises, which generated proceeds of about 2 percent of GDP.

Near-term outlook. Growth is forecast to increase to about 3½ percent this year and moderate to a trend rate of 2½ percent over the medium term. Strong construction activity is expected to remain an important driver for near-term growth (text figure), although the speed of the Canterbury post-earthquake rebuild and its interaction with the wider economy are less certain. The terms of trade are projected to ease somewhat due to an assumed moderation in global dairy prices, but remain high relative to historical levels and continue to boost growth in national income. The current monetary policy stance remains well below neutral, and with leading indicators pointing to an economy that is set to grow above trend in the near-term, pressure on core inflation should follow, particularly from the construction sector . . .

Economic expansion which is becoming increasingly embedded and broad-based. Growth peaking at 3.5% next year and going no lower than 2.5% over the next few years. That is very encouraging.

It will be driven by construction activity, much but not all of which will be in Christchurch. Higher prices for exports and increases in net migration will also help.

This is of course predicated on a continuation of current government policies which encourage economic development, exports and immigration, not a change to a left-wing government which will hamper growth, is anti business in general and farming in particular and anti-immigration.

 

 

 


For and against farming

June 10, 2014

The National Fieldays open tomorrow and MPs of all colours will be there at some stage.

Those from National will have a much easier job convincing farmers and those who work for, support and supply them that they deserve another term than any of the opposition parties will have trying to gain support.

National:

*Has several farmers in its caucus, understands farming and business and their importance to New Zealand.

*Holds all but two provincial electorates.

*Has kept public spending down.

*Has kept pressure off interest rates.

*Has begun reforming the RMA and will do more.

*Introduced 90 day employment trials.

*Lowered company and personal tax rates.

*Invested $400 million in water storage and irrigation

*Invested $700 million in the Primary Growth Partnership

*Exempted agricultural emissions from ETS and invested in Greenhouse Gas Coalition which has international support

*Expanded NZ’s access into the Middle East and South America, achieved direct currency exchange with China, and made significant progress on free trade throughout Asia-Pacific

While in the red and green corner Labour/Green/ and whoever else they need:

*Don’t understand or appreciate farmers, farming and business.

*See agriculture as a problem to be managed, not as the engine of our economy.

*Hold only 2 provincial seats.

*Will introduce a Capital Gains Tax

*Labour wants to double costs of the ETS and include agriculture

*Greens want to introduce a carbon tax charging $30 per dairy cow per year. Russell Norman said: “This won’t drive them to the wall… even the bottom 10% could afford to do this.”

*Have said farmers don’t pay enough tax. David Cunliffe has said businesses ‘can afford to pay more’. Russell Norman said last week when announcing new carbon tax ‘

*Will introduce water charges

*Will axe the irrigation fund

*Will tighten employment law

*Will increase public spending and debt which will push up interest rates

*Will make steeper increases to minimum wage.

*Will make KiwiSaver compulsory

*Oppose Free Trade

And let’s not forget this from which we all benefit:

If we stick to the Government’s plan, net Crown debt will fall to 20 per cent of GDP by 2020, well below the 60 per cent it was projected to reach under Labour’s policies from 2008. http://ntnl.org.nz/SqoQJh


%d bloggers like this: