What’s in a glass of milk?

June 1, 2014

Happy World Milk Day:

 

Photo: Isn't it amazing stuff? Happy World Milk Day 2014! #fonterra #funfacts #worldmilkday
Photo: It's World Milk Day today! To join the global celebrations we will share some fun facts about #milk today with you. Around the world, 87,717 glasses of milk are consumed every second of every day. Amazing, isn’t it? Like if you agree! #fonterra #funfacts #worldmilkday

#worldmilkday


Labour finally get a candidate

June 1, 2014

It’s taken a while but Labour has finally got a candidate for Tāmaki Makaurau.

Labour Party President Moira Coatsworth has announced that Peeni Henare will be Labour’s candidate for Tāmaki Makaurau at the 2014 General Election. . .

He’s a late starter.

But Labour hoped that Shane Taurima and then Julian Wilcox would stand for selection.

Taurima’s nomination was turned down after a report condemned his politicking at TVNZ.

Will Flavell, was nominated when the party opened, reopened and then extended the nomination period.

It was obvious the party didn’t want him. It isn’t clear how popular Henare is in the party and he’s not got much time to get the electorate’s support.

The Maori Party selected Rangi McLean, as its successor to Pita Sharples who holds the seat, a month ago and he’ll be four weeks of campaigning ahead.


Politics Daily

June 1, 2014

New Zealand Politics Daily is taking  a break.

I don’t have the time or inclination to provide the same service of a reasonably comprehensive list of links to news stories and blog posts on issues of the day.

However, I’m willing to start with a few and invite anyone who has read anything I’ve missed to add a link to it in a comment.

I won’t pretend to be balanced – there will be more links to blogs of a bluer hue. Anyone who wants the red and green end of the spectrum better represented is welcome to leave links.

IMP

NBR –    Harre confirms she is being paid by Dotcom — and how much:

Internet Party leader Laila Harre  has revealed she is being a paid back-bench MP salary as leader of the Internet Party . . .

Inventory 2 @ Keeping Stock – Is this a first?:

Laila Harre has confirmed suspicions that she is being paid a salary to lead the Internet Party; the NBR reports: . . .

Chris Keall @ NBR – NBR’s Laila Harre interview part 1: Free varsity; that John Banks donation

I sat down with Laila Harre soon after she was named Internet Party leader on Thursday. . . 

Rob Hosking @ NBR – Election 2014: Harre, Dotcom and hypocrisy:

The bizarre alliance coronation of former Alliance leader Laila Harre as leader of the Internet Party has raised more than a few eyebrows in the political world. . .

Colin Espiner @ Sunday Star Times – What’s behind Dotcom’s civil union?:

Say what you like about the sacrifice of conscience for cash – a great big German spanner has just been flung into the machinery of this year’s election campaign. . .

Mathew Beveridge – Laila Harre or Laila Haare?:

As part of the preparations for the announcement of their new party leader, the Internet Party has been doing a lot of work behind the scenes. . .

Mathew Beveridge – Laila Harre:

I was going to call this post “Laila Harre:A Twitter retrospective”. However, I thought that was a bit of a stretch, when she has less than 50 tweets to her name. . .

Jane Clifton @ The Listener – The Crazy days of autumn (paywalled):

It has always had the makings of a corny joke. A Maori, a German and an Indian walk into a party, and the bartender says … The punchline is no clearer, as the putative barman is still speechless. . .

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – Is there any democracy in the Internet Mana Party?

It is a bit of a joke is it not that a party that claims to be going to revolutionise politics in New Zealand is being populated by unreconstituted Stalinists and so far every position in the party has been appointed or paid for by a collector of Nazi memorabilia. . .

Russell Blackstock @ NZ Herald – Internet Party’s focus on young people:

The Internet Party’s first leader, Laila Harre, is promising young New Zealanders an “awesome” future in a growing digital economy. . .

David Farrar @ Kiwiblog – Translating Laila:

The HoS interviews Laila Harre: . . .

Ele Ludemann @ Homepaddock – Money can buy a leader:

Money can’t buy love but it can buy the leader of a political party: . . .

Bromhead @ NZ Herald – Cartoon: marriage of convenience

Housing

NBR –  Future of Auckland is smaller homes — Smith:

Housing Minister Nick Smith says the future of Auckland housing is “smaller, comfortable, affordable product”, noting Kiwi homes are twice the size of that in Europe.

Green Party

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – The Greens are going to need those printing presses soon:

The Green party has announced more than $280 million of extra health spending so far this year…more than the surplus forecast by Bill English. . . .

Inventory 2 @ Keeping Stock – Does this count as treating?:

Award-winning Fairfax reporter Andrea Vance has made a significant find on the merchandising table at the Green Party conference: . . .

Lindsay Mitchell – I only date boys . . . .

Keeping Stock blogs about this example of Green merchandising: . . .

Andrea Vance @ Stuff – Greens launch climate change policy:

The Greens have launched a controversial new climate change policy – a carbon tax. . .

Andrea Vance – Once upon a Green party conference:

Once upon a time, Green party conferences provided plenty of quirky material for journalists.

Polls

David Farrar @ Kiwiblog – Public polls May 2014:

That trend for Labour is very pronounced! . . .

Labour Party

Rodney Hide @ NZ Herald – Lonely Cunliffe must soldier on:

The David Cunliffe experiment has failed. Eight months into his leadership Labour is polling below what it was under Phil Goff and David Shearer. . .

Lou Taylor @ No Minister – The fine art of ‘thunking”:

As Rodney Hide points out today, Cunliffe and the remnants of the Labour Party really are up against the wall. . . 

Bevan Hurley @ NZ Herald – Secret files on old Labour leaders:

Newly declassified files from the Security Intelligence Service show secret police spied on future Labour Prime Ministers in the 1920s who were suspected of having Communist sympathies. . .

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – Cunliffe’s visit to the Coast – the true story

A West Coast member of the Ground Crew writes about David Cunliffe’s visit to Greymouth. . .

Matthew Beveridge – David Cunliffe with some cops:

David Cunliffe has been on a trip to the West Coast.

Other

Cameron Slater @ Whale Oil – Compare and contrast:

Remember the Herald reporting on the “Candle light vigil” protest that was held outside of John Key’s home a week ago? . . .

Sunday Star Times – Craig ‘compliment’ a Right game: Bradford:

The Conservative Party has a new, unwilling poster child – radical Left-winger Sue Bradford. . .

Matthew Beveridge – Tiwtter stats May 30:

Most Tweets by MP:

National: Tau Henare 243, Steven Joyce 33, Chris Tremain 30. . .

Marika Hill @ Stuff – Politicians lobbied over bible class:

Secular school campaigners are knocking on politicians’ doors to lobby for a law change over religious lessons in school. . .

Dominion Post – Today in politics: Saturday, May 31

David Farrar @ Kiwiblog – Best ever thread on the Standard:

Someone called Geoff (note not brave enough to use his full name) at asked: . . .


Word of the day

June 1, 2014

Thunking – the art of thinking backwards.

Hat tip: Lou Taylor


Rural round-up

June 1, 2014

Alliance director ‘a real Kiwi chick’  – Sally Rae:

Alliance Group’s newest independent director Vanessa Stoddart describes the meat industry as being ”at the heart” of New Zealand. She talked to agribusiness reporter Sally Rae during the company’s inaugural Pure South conference in Queenstown this week.

Vanessa Stoddart loves transforming big companies and cultures.

Last month, the Auckland-based businesswoman with an impressive resume was appointed to the board of Alliance Group as an independent director. . .

Bigger ‘not better’in dairy industry – Sally Rae:

Big is not necessarily better.

That was the message from Alliance Group independent director Graeme Milne to suppliers attending the company’s inaugural Pure South conference in Queenstown this week.

Mr Milne, who has a 30-year involvement in the dairy industry, was chief executive of the New Zealand Dairy Group prior to the formation of Fonterra.

Among various other directorships, he is chairman of Mid Canterbury dairy-processor Synlait. He was appointed to Alliance Group’s board last year. . .

One woman and her dog  – Sahiban Kanwal:

Nicky Thompson believes you have got to have the hunger to be better than the best.

Women taking part in sheep dog trial championships in New Zealand was unheard of 50 years ago.

These days, however, Thompson, from Omihi in North Canterbury, is living proof of an ever-changing farming community.

Thompson is one of the competitors at the New Zealand and South Island Sheep Dog Trial Championships at Waihi Station, near Geraldine, throughout this week. . .

Alliance considering pool payment – Lynda Gray:

A pool payment – the first in two years – could be on the cards for Alliance shareholders.

The cautiously optimistic promise was delivered by Alliance chairman Murray Taggart on the first day of the meat company’s inaugural supplier conference in Queenstown.

Also announced was the planned rollout on October 1 of a new yield payment system based on different price premiums for the primal shoulder, leg, and loin cuts. . .

More to Mt Hutt than just snow:

Iconic is an overused word these days, but occasionally it is justified – as in the case of Mt Hutt Station and not just because it covers the lower slopes of the Mid-Canterbury plains’ most visible landmark.

Its status – both nationally and internationally – is in no small part because of Mt Hutt Station’s owners, the Hood family. Because of the Hoods, Mt Hutt Station is now indelibly linked with large-scale deer farming.

For more than 35 years the property has been developed and farmed by the Hood family after Keith and his late brother Doug purchased the station in 1978. By the early 1990s, the station that had once run up to 14,000 ewes, was virtually totally deer. The station is now farmed by Keith and his wife Dennise, along with their son Bruce and daughter-in- law Becky. . .

It's World Milk Day today! To join the global celebrations we will share some fun facts about #milk today with you. Around the world, 87,717 glasses of milk are consumed every second of every day. Amazing, isn’t it? Like if you agree! #fonterra #funfacts #worldmilkday

Confidence expressed in industry’s future :

New Zealand’s largest deer farmer, Landcorp Farming, has confidence in the future of the deer industry, said its general manager of farm operations.

Addressing the Deer Industry New Zealand conference in Methven recently, Graeme Mulligan said the company was confident in the future of deer farming.

While Landcorp’s reliance on dairying would grow considerably, it was still keen to be in the deer industry.

Deer provided a diversity of product mix to the business and featured in its revenue strategy. . .


Patrick George Morrison CMG – 25.4.31 – 26.5.14

June 1, 2014

One of Country Calendar’s early programmes was screening when we got to the Darfield Recreation Centre for Pat Morrison’s funeral on Friday.

He was a young man when it was filmed, about 50 years ago, but the programme showed Pat had already achieved a lot in and for farming and the community.

He continued to do even more.

Tributes could only touch on all he had done and done so well.

However, you could have walked in to the service not knowing him, and come out with a deep appreciation of him as a farmer, farming leader, community stalwart, family man and friend.

Tim Cronshaw writes:

Retired Darfield farmer Pat Morrison will be remembered for his relentless energy as the founding chairman driving out the Central Plains Water (CPW) irrigation scheme.

The farmer, irrigation champion and big business director died this week in his early 80s.

In a ceremony last month marking the first turn of the sod by Prime Minister John Key, Morrison confided that, along with others, he had spent as many as 800 days working on the scheme.

Longtime friend Fred Bull said if the truth was known, he’d probably devoted more of his time.

“It would be 800 full days because there was a lot of weeks he was in Christchurch for a day or two and I don’t think it would be there without his tenacity.”

During a long farming history Morrison was awarded a Nuffield Farming Scholarship and AC Cameron Medal and recognised for his services to farming in the honours list in the 1990s.

His commitment to public duty began as secretary of the local cricket club in 1951 and more than 60 years later he was still an active director on the CPW board, resigning as chairman after nine years in 2012.

He served with Federated Farmers, the Young Farmers Club and Malvern A & P Association and was a director of the BNZ bank. He took on the hard jobs as chairman of the New Zealand Wool Board and New Zealand Wool Services International and was a chief opponent of a proposal to put a landfill in the Malvern Hills.

Morrison had the mix of business and farming skills and connections through the industry to make him the perfect choice to lead Central Plains Water, said board member and Buddle Findlay partner Willy Palmer.

“He was respected by everyone and gave everything to any cause he pursued and did it with style and with a great sense of humour. … I don’t believe anyone else had the necessary skills to take Central Plains from a start-up company to where it got to when he resigned as chairman.” . . .

Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre chairwoman Jeanette Maxwell said Morrison was respected by farmers for his work with Canterbury irrigation and before that with the wool industry.

“Back when I was a little girl he did a lot of work in the wool industry. He was a strong rural man and passionate about his industry. Along the way he provided strong leadership and would really drive to get things achieved.” . . .

He was a good man who gave far more than he got. His sudden death has left a big hole in his family, farming, the community and New Zealand.


Landscape of the heart

June 1, 2014

Open large picture

It is still so new & all we see is the empty space, but that is not how it is in the landscape of the heart. There, there is no empty space & he still laughs & grapples with ideas & plans & nods wisely with each of us in turn. We are proud to have known him. We are proud to have called him friend.

Landscape of the Heart ©2014 Brian Andreas – published with permission.

You’ll find a place to sign up for a daily dose of whimsy like this by email if you click on the link.

 


5/10

June 1, 2014

Just 5/10 in NBR’s Biz Quiz.


Standing up for children

June 1, 2014

Tweet of the day:


World Milk Day

June 1, 2014

It’s World Milk Day:

Why hold a World Milk Day? The Day provides an opportunity to focus attention on milk and to publicise activities connected with milk and the milk industry. The fact that many countries choose to do this on the same day lends additional importance to individual national celebrations and shows that milk is a global food.

Where did it begin? FAO (the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations) was asked to propose a specific day on which all aspects of milk could be celebrated.

Why 1st June? This date was chosen because a number of countries were already celebrating a national milk day on or around this time. Late May was originally proposed, but some countries, for example China, felt they already had too many celebrations in that month. While most countries hold their celebrations on 1st June, some choose to hold them a week or so before or after this date. . . .

What’s not to celebrate when:

Photo: Did you know this? #fonterra #funfacts #worldmilkday

Milk has both nutritional and economic importance to New Zealand.

. . . Dairying has experienced a resurgence in the past decade as increasingly sophisticated consumers look to naturally functional and whole foods for their nutritional needs, says Jacqueline Chow, director of global brands and nutrition at New Zealand dairy co-operative Fonterra.

The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations runs World Milk Day on June 1 and many organisations run events to drive awareness of the benefits of milk, she said.

Every minute around the world 1.3 million litres of milk will be consumed and 1353 tonnes of cow and buffalo milk will be produced.

Ms Chow says demand for milk shows no sign of abating with the world expected to require another 100 billion litres by 2020.

Consumption is being driven by a burgeoning middle class in emerging economies, ageing populations, a move towards natural, high protein food sources and scientific innovation in dairy. .

The challenge for the industry is to ensure the economic and social impacts don’t come at the cost of the environment.


Money can buy a leader

June 1, 2014

Money can’t buy love but it can buy the leader of a political party:

Internet Party leader Laila Harre has revealed she is being a paid back-bench MP salary as leader of the Internet Party

A backbench MP is paid $147,800, plus perks including travel and accommodation expenses plus super.

The usual remuneration for the leader of a minor party out of power is nothing.

Leaders could expect to have expenses covered or reimbursed but in any other party it’s a voluntary position.

“I have just agreed to a contract which is in line with the already public intention of the party to pay candidates the same as a backbench MP. . .

How does this fit electoral law which limits election spending?

Kim Dotcom, who made his fortune from Megaupload (for which he faces piracy, money laundering and racketeering charges), and sister sites including Megaporn and Megaerotic, has revealed he is bankrolling Internet Mana to the tune of $3 million.

Earlier, Internet Party CEO Vikram Kumar told NBR that other sources of funding paled next to the money being tipped into the campaign by one of Mr Dotcom’s family trusts. . .

This in effect means she’s not being paid by the party but by Dotcom.

If he’s paying the piper he’ll also be calling the tune.


Sunday soapbox

June 1, 2014

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse.
This won’t have you in stitches, but it was too good not to share.  #FunnyFriday


June 1 in history

June 1, 2014

193 Roman Emperor Didius Julianus was assassinated.

987 Hugh Capet was elected King of France.

1204  King Philip Augustus of France conquered Rouen.

1215  Beijing ruler Emperor Xuanzong of Jin, was captured by the Mongols under Genghis Khan, ending the Battle of Beijing.

1252 Alfonso X was elected King of Castile and León.

1495  Friar John Cor recorded the first known batch of scotch whisky.

1533  Anne Boleyn was crowned Queen of England.

1660 Mary Dyer was hanged for defying a law banning Quakers from the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

1679 The Scottish Covenanters defeated John Graham of Claverhouse at the Battle of Drumclog.

1779  Benedict Arnold, a general in the Continental Army was court-martialed for malfeasance.

1792  Kentucky was admitted as the 15th state of the United States.

1794 The battle of the Glorious First of June was fought, the first naval engagement between Britain and France during the French Revolutionary Wars.

1796 Tennessee was admitted as the 16th state of the United States.

1812  War of 1812: U.S. President James Madison asked the Congress to declare war on the United Kingdom.

1813  James Lawrence, the mortally-wounded commander of the USS Chesapeake, gave his final order: “Don’t give up the ship!”

1815  Napoleon swore fidelity to the Constitution of France.

1831  James Clark Ross discovered the North Magnetic Pole.

1843 Henry Faulds, Scottish fingerprinting pioneer, was born  (d. 1930).

1855  American adventurer William Walker conquered Nicaragua.

1857 Charles Baudelaire‘s Fleurs du mal was published.

1862  American Civil War, Peninsula Campaign: Battle of Seven Pines (or the Battle of Fair Oaks) ended inconclusively, with both sides claiming victory.

1868 Treaty of Bosque Redondo was signed allowing the Navajos to return to their lands in Arizona and New Mexico.

1869  Thomas Edison received a patent for his electric voting machine.

1878 – John Masefield, English novelist and poet was born (d. 1967).

1879 Napoleon Eugene, the last dynastic Bonaparte, was killed in the Anglo-Zulu War.

1886 – The railroads of the Southern United States converted 11,000 miles of track from a five foot rail gauge to standard gauge.

1890  The United States Census Bureau began using Herman Hollerith‘s tabulating machine to count census returns.

1907 Frank Whittle, English inventor of the jet engine was born (d. 1996).

1910  Robert Falcon Scott’s South Pole expedition left England.

1918  World War I: Battle for Belleau Wood – Allied Forces under John J. Pershing and James Harbord engaged Imperial German Forces under Wilhelm, German Crown Prince.

1920  Adolfo de la Huerta became president of Mexico.

1921 Nelson Riddle, American bandleader and arranger, was born  (d. 1985).

1921 Tulsa Race Riot.

1922  The Royal Ulster Constabulary was founded.

1926 Andy Griffith, American actor  was born.

1926 – Marilyn Monroe, American actress, was born  (d. 1962).

1928  Bob Monkhouse, English comedian, was born (d. 2003).

1929  The 1st Conference of the Communist Parties of Latin America was held in Buenos Aires.

1930 Edward Woodward, English actor, was born  (d. 2009).

1934 Pat Boone, American singer, was born.

1935  The first driving tests were introduced in the United Kingdom.

1937 Morgan Freeman, American actor, was born.

1937 Colleen McCullough, Australian novelist, was born.

1939 Maiden flight of the Focke-Wulf Fw 190 Würger (D-OPZE) fighter aeroplane.

1940  The Leninist Communist Youth League of the Karelo-Finnish SSR holds its first congress.

1940  The Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation went out of business, giving the City of New York full control of the subway system in the city.

1941  World War II: Battle of Crete ended as Crete capitulated to Germany.

1941 – The Farhud, a pogrom of Iraqi Jews in Baghdad.

1942 World War II: the Warsaw paper Liberty Brigade published the first news of the concentration camps.

1943 British Overseas Airways Corporation Flight 777 wasshot down over the Bay of Biscay by German Junkers Ju 88s, killing actor Leslie Howard and leading to speculation the downing was an attempt to kill British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

1946 Ion Antonescu, “Conducator” (leader) of Romania during World War 2, was executed.

1947 – Ronnie Wood, English guitarist (Rolling Stones), was born.

1950 Wayne Nelson, American musician (Little River Band), was born.

1956  First international flight (to Montreal YUL) from the Atlanta Municipal Airport

1958 Charles de Gaulle came out of retirement to lead France by decree for six months.

1960 New Zealand’s first official television transmission began at 7.30pm.

NZ's first official TV broadcast

1960 Simon Gallup, English bassist (The Cure), was born.

1963  Kenya gained internal self-rule (Madaraka Day).

1974  Flixborough disaster: an explosion at a chemical plant killed 28 people.

1974 –The Heimlich maneuver for rescuing choking victims was published in the journal Emergency Medicine.

1978 – The first international applications under the Patent Cooperation Treaty were filed.

1979 – The first black-led government of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 90 years took power.

1980  Cable News Network (CNN) begins broadcasting.

1988  The 4th Congress of the Communist Youth of Greece started.

1990  George H. W. Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev signed a treaty to end chemical weapon production.

1993  Dobrinja mortar attack: 13 were killed and 133 wounded when Serb mortar shells are fired at a soccer game in Dobrinja, west of Sarajevo.

1999  American Airlines Flight 1420 slid and crashed while landing at Little Rock National Airport, killing 11 people.

2000  The Patent Law Treaty was signed.

2001  Nepalese royal massacre : Crown Prince Dipendra of Nepal shot and killed several members of his family including his father and mother, King Birendra and Queen Aiswarya.

2001 – Dolphinarium massacre: a Hamas suicide bomber killed 21 at a disco in Tel Aviv.

2003  Filling began of the reservoir behind the Three Gorges Dam.

2005 The Dutch referendum on the European Constitution resulted in its rejection.

2009 Air France Flight 447 crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Brazil. All 228 passengers and crew were killed.

2009 – General Motors filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy. It is the fourth largest United States bankruptcy in history.

2011 – A rare tornado outbreak occurred in New England; a strong EF3 tornado struck Springfield, Massachusetts during the event, killing four people.

2012 – The Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental jumbo jet aircraft was introduced with Lufthansa.

Sourced from NZ  History Online & Wikipedia


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