Rural round-up

Wishing won’t make it happen – Allan Barber:

Southland Regional Council chair, Ali Timms, hopes the government will take on board her warning about the effect of the red meat sector’s continued decline on water quality and increased nitrogen levels.

It’s an understandable message from a regional councillor, given the impact on a region’s land uses and water resources. But it’s no different from the message being promoted by Meat Industry Excellence group and sheep and beef farmers in general, except for the focus on water quality.

Wringing the hands and wishing won’t make a blind bit of difference. Minister of Agriculture Nathan Guy has repeated his position which reflects exactly what the Prime Minister told the Red Meat Sector Conference last year: if the meat industry as a whole can agree on a restructuring plan, the government will support it. Otherwise it won’t interfere to provide a legislative remedy to a commercial problem, nor should it. . .

Creating value aim of deer industry strategy – Sally Rae:

After joining Deer Industry New Zealand eight months ago as its new chief executive, Dan Coup learnt ”pretty quickly” that confidence among producers was generally at a low ebb.

He arrived at a time when farmers were frustrated at the state of profitability, particularly in venison, and were determined that things needed to change.

Addressing the deer industry conference in Methven this week, Mr Coup said that was well understood by Deer Industry New Zealand (Dinz) which was taking up the challenge. . . .

 

Big grants for Kiwi animal to human disease scientists:

A group of scientists including some from Massey and Otago Universities has been given grants worth $8.8 million to study infectious diseases spread from animals to humans.

The coalition of researchers working in northern Tanzania has won three grants to study zoonotic infectious diseases among poor livestock keepers.
Professor John Crump, the McKinlay Professor of Global Health and co-director of the Otago University Centre for International Health, is involved in all three projects.Massey researchers who are internationally leading experts in food safety and meat production will play a key role in one that focuses on foodborne disease spread risk during the transition from subsistence to commercial livestock production.The overall programme, Zoonoses in Emerging Livestock Systems’ (ZELS), is funded by the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and UK Department for International Development (DfID) and seeks to improve the health of poor farmers and their livestock through integrated human, animal and environmental health research, an approach often referred to as One Health. . . .

Irrigators mull options for upgrade – David Bruce:

Farmers between Duntroon and Kurow are considering plans to upgrade their irrigation schemes and preliminary estimates for the work range from almost $30 million to $53.6 million.

Two options for improving the schemes, potentially irrigating another 5597ha, have come out of a study undertaken by the Kurow-Duntroon Irrigation Co, Maerewhenua District Water Resource Co and Waitaki Independent Irrigators Inc, which collectively irrigate about 7700ha.

The Lower Waitaki south bank integrated irrigation study was prompted by requirements to upgrade schemes to renew resource consents, including conditions relating to the more efficient use of water. . .

Otago Highlanders help Fonterra:

Fonterra Milk for Schools celebrates one year in Otago today. To date, 8,135 school children from 100 schools across the region have participated in the programme.

The milestone is being marked with a celebration at Otago’s George Street Normal School where students were challenged to a ‘fastest folder competition’ by members of the Otago Highlanders Super Rugby team.

George Street Normal Principal, Rod Galloway, says the Fonterra Milk for Schools programme is providing nutrition that is beneficial to the children’s learning, and is also helping to teach them about the importance of recycling. . .

Milk for schools helps Asian children:

Kiwi kids drinking free school milk are helping Asian students learn by recycling the milk packs.

Fourteen million Fonterra Milk for Schools packs emptied by 170,000 New Zealand primary school children in the last year have been sent to Thailand and Malaysia where they are recycled into products including desks, paper, books and roof sheets.

At George Street Normal School in Dunedin yesterday children and Highlanders rugby team players took part in a fastest folder competition.

Principal Rod Galloway said as well as providing nutrition beneficial to the children’s learning the programme was teaching them about the importance of recycling. . .

 

 Think twice before bashing farmers and their practices – Lauren Purdy:

After offending farmers everywhere with their aggressive ad campaign claiming local-raised food is healthier and anything else is just plain bad, Chipotle is feeling the effects of what some would call Karma.

According to Gary Truitt, Chipotle has seen a shift downward in its stock shares recently, falling 7% to $495.92. The burrito giant also saw its proposed executive pay plan voted down by 77% of shareholders last Thursday. Since the plan was denied, the entire pay structure of higher level employees within the company will now be reviewed. . .

 

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