Word of the day

May 22, 2014

Moider – to confuse, perplex, bewilder; to exhaust, overcome, stupefy; throw into disorder or an unsettled state; talk in a rambling or confused manner; bother or pester.


Rural round-up

May 22, 2014

Dambusters must not damn Hawke’s Bay’s future:

The draft report from the Tukituki Board of Inquiry is a poor outcome for the entire Hawke’s Bay community, not just farmers.

“The recent Board of Inquiry draft report won’t be a good outcome for Hawke’s Bay if it ends up blocking the single largest environmental and economic opportunity we’ve got from progressing,” says Will Foley, Federated Farmers Hawke’s Bay provincial president.

“We mustn’t kid ourselves that Ngai Tahu’s polite wording in its withdrawal, simply reflects the kicking Ruataniwha got in the draft decision. 

“They are a big loss but Ngai Tahu is also one very smart farmer.  If it can see the scheme is a financial goer then I am certain they’ll be back, as will other investors. . .

Recovery from Psa and record returns drive rebound of orchard values:

New Zealand kiwifruit growers have received the highest-ever average per-hectare return for supplying Zespri Green Kiwifruit, Zespri’s 2013/14 annual results show.

While the return to the individual grower is influenced by factors such as orchard yield, costs and fruit characteristics, the average $42,659 per-hectare Green return underlined confidence in the industry’s future, Zespri chairman Peter McBride said.

“After the impact of Psa over the past three years, there is a real sense of optimism in the industry now. Orchard prices have rebounded, investment has started again and the future looks bright,” Mr McBride said. . . .

Federated Farmers backs wool levy vote:

Federated Farmers welcomes the opportunity wool growers will have to vote on whether to reinstate a levy on wool.  It urges its members to engage in the process to come, to talk with the Wool Levy Group we’ll help to set up meetings with and above all, to vote.

“Wool has been the quiet export achiever worth $700 million to New Zealand in 2013,” says Jeanette Maxwell, Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre chairperson.

“At that level, it easily eclipsed the exports of personal, cultural, and recreational services, which, by the way, includes motion pictures.

“We are here now because the pan sector Wool Levy Group has learned from history. It is defining what the levy will fund and do but boy, do we need to crack some industry good issues that are holding wool back. . .

$33,000 sale ‘amazing highlight’ for family – Sally Rae:

Selling a bull for $33,000 at the national Hereford sale at AgInnovation was an ”amazing highlight” for the Paterson family from Greenvale, near Gore.

Waikaka Skytower 1289 was bought by Peter Reeves, from Mokairau Station at Gisborne – the third-highest-priced Hereford bull at the sale.

The Paterson family, from Waikaka Station, have been breeding Herefords since 1954 and it was the highest price they have achieved. . .

Student ‘gets his name out there’ – Sally Rae:

It may have been his debut at the Hereford national show and sale – but young Middlemarch breeder Will Gibson made his mark.

His bull Foulden Hill McCoy was third in the Honda Motorcycles Impact Sires led class and went on to sell for $9000 to Nelson Hereford stud Lake Station.

Mr Gibson (20), a third-year student at Lincoln University studying agricultural commerce, also received the Hereford herdsman award. . . .

The simple answer to MPI milk chilling regulations:

There are very few dairy farmers who will not be affected by the new MPI milk chilling regulations. An innovation first revealed at Central Districts Field Days promises to be the simple solution, with some added advantages. And it’s already creating a flurry of interest in the industry.

Matt Parkinson and Dale Stone are already well known in the dairy and refrigeration industries and Snapchill is their answer to the issues that the MPI’s regulations will create.

Snapchill is a milk chilling solution aimed at the 75% of New Zealand farmers who have herds if between 300 and 600 cows. The unit can typically be fitted in a day or two and does not require a power upgrade to the farm supply. It sits between farmers’ existing pre-chillers and the bulk milk vat and works by creating ice during off-peak times when power is cheaper. As it does so, it recovers heat – enough to make a tank full of water at around 82° for the plant wash. . . .


Thursday’s quiz

May 22, 2014

1. Who said: In large states, public education will always be mediocre, for the same reason that in large kitchens the cooking is usually bad.?

2.  What is a spurtle?

3. It’s four in French, forno in Italian, horno in Spanish and oumu in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What would you do with a toque?

5. You’ve got half an hour to prepare a meal for unexpected guests, what do you cook?


Where will milk price go?

May 22, 2014

Fonterra will announce its forecast payout for the 2014/15 season next week.

This graph showing the relationship between GlobalDairyTrade auction prices and the payout give a good indication of where it’s likely to go:

milkgdt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The milk price has shadowed the GDT price index until the last few months when the index has fallen but the payout has remained higher.

Even the most optimistic forecasts for the coming season indicate a fall from the 2013/14 record payout.

This graph reinforces that and there’s speculation the new season’s inaugural forecast could be down by more than $1.50, to $7 per kilogram of milk solids (kg ms).  

. . . BNZ economist Doug Steel said a lower payout forecast was unlikely to surprise farmers, given highly visible declines in world prices to date.

Given current price and currency conditions, a milk price forecast somewhere around the $7 kg ms mark seemed plausible, Mr Steel said.

”This [latest decline] fits within our view that dairy prices would be lower this year,” he said in a statement.

Westpac chief economist Dominick Stephens also believed the new season payout forecast next week would be well down, at around $7.10kg ms, while also picking the present season forecast would be downgraded, from $8.65 to $8.50kg ms.

Because the dairy sector carried the majority, or about 65% of all agricultural debt, and half the dairy debt was held by about 10% of all farmers, the Reserve Bank was watching the sector closely, he said. . .

Wise farmers have used this season’s record payout to reduce debt and have been budgeting on a lower payout for the coming season.

 


More bad blood spilt

May 22, 2014

More of the bad blood between independent MP Brendan Horan and his former leader Winston Peters was spilled in parliament yesterday:

. . . Mr Horan told Parliament on Wednesday that New Zealand First is using taxpayer-funded computer software for party political purposes, such as campaigning and fundraising.

He said the party has paid tens of thousands of dollars out of the leader’s budget to develop this software and that Parliamentary staff are running the programme in preparation for the general election on 20 September.

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters said the accusations are without foundation. . .

Horan’s given up on an official complaint about his allegation Peters should have declared a horse on his register of pecuniary interests.

But he’s obviously not giving up on any chance to get at Peters.


What about the provinces?

May 22, 2014

The debate on immigration and the pressure it might place on house prices is an Auckland and Christchurch centric one.

The demand for houses in those two cities is outstripping supply and the inevitable result of that is pressure on prices.

The sadly inevitable result of that is dog-whistle anti-immigration politics.

That’s a triennial hardy for New Zealand First leader Winston Peters as he tries to convert xenophobia into votes each election year.

To his shame, Labour leader David Cunliffe is echoing that dog whistle.

. . . The annual figure has plummeted too, from 34,100 to 11,000, but the immigration debate is now central to the political fight over house prices.

Because as well as more New Zealanders staying home than ever, more foreigners are moving here too – 71,210 in the last year, the highest in 11 years.

Labour leader David Cunliffe says their arrival comes at the expense of New Zealanders.

“Extra heat on our housing market drives up interest rates and exceeds the capacity of our education and health systems to cope,” he says.

Net migration is the crucial overall figure, which shows population growth is also at a decade high, up to 34,400 in the past year.

Treasury has predicted it could blow out to 41,500, and ANZ economists go higher, predicting 45,000.

Labour says the past ideal was just 5,000 to 15,000. . .

Auckland and Christchurch might not want many more people, but what about the rest of the country, in particular the provinces?

After several successive censuses showing the population declining in our district, last year’s census recorded a very small but very welcome increase.

That it was small in spite of the big increase in jobs that have come in the wake of irrigation means had it not been for that development we’d still have been going backwards.

That the debate on immigration focuses on Auckland, and to a lesser extent Christchurch, shows that the provinces aren’t on Labour’s radar.

If immigration is really a problem in some areas – and that is debatable – why does it have to be limited in areas which would welcome more people?

Why should the provinces pay the price for the poor planning decisions which have meant that the housing supply in Auckland hasn’t kept up with demand?

Why should we lose out on immigrants who could provide investment, workers and a population boost where they’re needed?

The xenophobes are quick to point out problems with immigration.

This picture shows the upside in the UK – is it likely to be different here?


May 22 in history

May 22, 2014

334 BC The Macedonian army of Alexander the Great defeated Darius III of Persia in the Battle of the Granicus.

1176 The Hashshashin (Assassins) attempted to murder Saladin near Aleppo.

1377  Pope Gregory XI issued five papal bulls to denounce the doctrines of English theologian John Wycliffe.

1455 Wars of the Roses: at the First Battle of St Albans, Richard, Duke of York, defeated and captured King Henry VI of England.

1724 Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne, French explorer  was born (d. 1772).

1762 Sweden and Prussia signed the Treaty of Hamburg.

1807 A grand jury indicted former Vice President of the United States Aaron Burr on a charge of treason.

1807 Most of the English town of Chudleigh was destroyed by fire.

1809 On the second and last day of the Battle of Aspern-Essling (near Vienna), Napoleon was repelled by an enemy army for the first time.

1813 Richard Wagner, German composer, was born (d. 1883).

1819 The SS Savannah left port at Savannah, Georgia, on a voyage to become the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean.

1826  HMS Beagle departed on its first voyage.

1840 The transporting of British convicts to the New South Wales colony was abolished.

1842 Farmers Lester Howe and Henry Wetsel discovered Howe Caverns when they stumbled upon a large hole in the ground.

1843 Thousands of people and their cattle headed west via wagon train from Independence, Missouri to what would later become the Oregon Territory . They were part of the Great Migration.

1844 Persian Prophet The Báb announced his revelation, founding Bábism. He announced to the world the coming of “He whom God shall make manifest”.

1848 Slavery was abolished in Martinique.

1856  Congressman Preston Brooks of South Carolina beat Senator Charles Sumner with a cane in the hall of the United States Senate for a speech Sumner had made attacking Southerners who sympathized with the pro-slavery violence in Kansas (“Bleeding Kansas“).

1859  Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, British physician and writer, was born  (d. 1930).

1871  The U.S. Army issued an order for abandonment of Fort Kearny in Nebraska.

1872  Reconstruction: U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant signed the Amnesty Act of 1872 into law restoring full civil rights to all but about 500 Confederate sympathizers.

1884  The first representative New Zealand rugby team played its first match, defeating a Wellington XV 9-0.

First NZ Rugby team in action

1897 The Blackwall Tunnel under the River Thames was officially opened.

1903 Launch of the White Star Liner,  SS Ionic.

1906 The 1906 Summer Olympics, not now recognized as part of the official Olympic Games, opened in Athens.

1906  The Wright brothers were granted U.S. patent number 821,393 for their “Flying-Machine”.

1907 Laurence Olivier, English stage and screen actor, was born  (d. 1989).

1915 Lassen Peak eruptsed.

1915 Three trains collided in the Quintinshill rail crash near Gretna Green,, killing 227 people and injuring 246.

1936 Aer Lingus (Aer Loingeas) was founded by the Irish government as the national airline of the Republic of Ireland.

1936  M. Scott Peck, American psychiatrist and writer, was born  (d. 2005).

1939 World War II: Germany and Italy signed the Pact of Steel.

1942  Mexico entered World War II on the side of the Allies.

1942 The Steel Workers Organizing Committee disbanded, and a new trade union, the United Steelworkers, was formed.

1946  George Best, Northern Irish footballer, was born  (d. 2005).

1947  Cold War: in an effort to fight the spread of Communism, U.S. President Harry S. Truman signed the Truman Doctrine granting $400 million in military and economic aid to Turkey and Greece, each battling an internal Communist movement.

1958  Sri Lankan riots of 1958: a watershed event in the race relationship of the various ethnic communities of Sri Lanka. The total number of deaths is estimated to be 300, mostly Sri Lankan Tamils.

1950 Bernie Taupin, English songwriter, was born.

1955 Iva Davies, Australian rock star (Icehouse), was born.

1960 An earthquake measuring 9.5 on the moment magnitude scale, now known as the Great Chilean Earthquake, hit southern Chile – the most powerful earthquake ever recorded.

1962  Continental Airlines Flight 11 crashed after bombs explode on board.

1963  Assassination attempt of Greek left-wing politician Gregoris Lambrakis.

1964 U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announced the goals of his Great Society social reforms to bring an “end to poverty and racial injustice” in America.

1967  The L’Innovation department store in the centre of Brussels burned down -the most devastating fire in Belgian history, resulting in 323 dead and missing and 150 injured.

1968 The nuclear-powered submarine the USS Scorpion sank with 99 men aboard 400 miles southwest of the Azores.

1969  Apollo 10‘s lunar module flew within 8.4 nautical miles (16 km) of the moon’s surface.

1970 Naomi Campbell, British model and actress, was born.

1972  Ceylon adoptseda new constitution, ecoming a Republic, changed its name to Sri Lanka, and joined the Commonwealth of Nations.

1980  Namco released the arcade game Pac-Man.

1990  Microsoft released the Windows 3.0 operating system.

1992  After 30 years, 66-year-old Johnny Carson hosted The Tonight Show for the last time.

1995 – Waikato-Tainui signed a Deed of Settlement with the Crown.

Waikato-Tainui sign Deed of Settlement with the Crown

1997  Kelly Flinn, US Air Force’s first female bomber pilot certified for combat, accepted a general discharge in order to avoid a court martial.

1998 Lewinsky scandal: a federal judge ruled that United States Secret Service agents could be compelled to testify before a grand jury.

2002 – A jury in Birmingham, Alabama, convicted former Ku Klux Klan member Bobby Frank Cherry of the 1963 murders of four girls in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church.

2003 Annika Sörenstam became the first woman to play the PGA Tour in 58 years.

2004  Hallam, Nebraska, was wiped out by a powerful F4 tornado (part of the May 2004 tornado outbreak sequence) that broke a width record at 2.5 miles (4.0 km) wide, and killed one resident.

2008  The Late-May 2008 tornado outbreak sequence unleashed 235 tornadoes, including an EF4 and an EF5 tornado, between 22 May and 31 May 2008. The tornadoes struck 19 US states and one Canadian province.

2011– An EF5 Tornado struck the US city of Joplin, Missouri killing 161 people, the single deadliest US tornado since modern record keeping began in 1950.

2012 – Tokyo Skytree was opened to public. It is the tallest tower in world (634 m), and the second tallest man-made structure on Earth, after Burj Khalifa (829.8 m).

2013 – British soldier Lee Rigby was murdered in a London Street.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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