The value of work

The facts are unequivocal: children brought up in  families where at least one parent is working generally do better than children in families on the same income from a benefit.

That doesn’t mean that every child in a working family does well, nor that every child in a beneficiary family doesn’t.

It does mean that the chances of doing better, in social and financial terms, are greater in working families than beneficiary ones.

It does mean that there’s more than a monetary value to work and more than the income to lose by not working.
Photo: 84,000 more Kiwis in work over the past year.  http://bit.ly/1iVcOn0

This is why National is determined to help people who can work to do so, and why 84,000 more jobs added to the economy last year is cause for celebration.

One Response to The value of work

  1. Andrei says:

    The facts are unequivocal: children brought up in families where at least one parent is working generally do better than children in families on the same income from a benefit.

    Oh fie in two parent families both parents will be working – this statement redefines the meaning of “work” to only include” those tasks that a remunerated in ways that the tax department can take a cut of.

    For most of us that sort of work is only the means to and end so that we can accomplish the real tasks in life that are important – and for those with their heads screwed on (less and less as time goes on) raising our families is in general top of the list and the top priority.

    Exhibit

    Like

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