Consumer stress drops to 2-yr low

Consumer stress in New Zealand has fallen to its lowest level since the beginning of 2012 as the economy’s ongoing expansion continues to boost New Zealanders’ financial position and strengthen their capacity to borrow and spend.

Despite interest rates rising, Dun & Bradstreet’s Consumer Financial Stress Index has found that stress levels improved during the first quarter of the year to reach -5.6 points in March, down from 7.5 points a year earlier. An index reading below zero indicates that lower financial stress exists among consumers.

Increasingly healthy economic conditions in New Zealand have seen the stress index, which reflects consumer credit activity, demand, capacity and confidence, fall ahead of its mid-year forecast, suggesting that Kiwis will continue to see their financial position strengthen throughout 2014.

Last year’s breakout economic performance in New Zealand saw the Consumer Financial Stress Index fall from 13.9 points to zero across the year. According to D&B’s country analysis, this performance will continue through 2014, with real GDP growth in New Zealand forecast to lift to 3.4 per cent on the back of strong trade, bustling business confidence, population growth and consumer spending.

While further interest rate increases have the potential to temper consumers’ willingness to borrow and spend on credit, D&B expects the economy’s underlying momentum and a healthy jobs market to drive a further reduction in financial stress levels.

“With good news on the economy continuing to circulate during the first quarter of the year we’re seeing consumer optimism consolidate and financial stress ease,“ said Dennis Martin, Managing Director of Dun & Bradstreet New Zealand.

“Falling unemployment and confidence in jobs growth are supporting consumers’ willingness and ability to spend, while the booming property and share markets are lifting household wealth.

Improvements in unemployment have been lagging behind other positive indicators but that is beginning to change.

“While consumers appear set to face additional interest rate increases this year, which will place some strain on their debt repayments, we forecast that stress levels will continue to ease through to the middle of this year,” Mr Martin added. 

Fundamental to the positive trend in consumer stress has been the falling unemployment rate, which has declined for consecutive quarters, most recently reaching six per cent in Q4 2013.  Job security and employment opportunities are essential to financial comfort and confidence, and have been evident in D&B’s analysis of stress levels. . .

New Zealand’s Financial Stress Index is more than 20 points lower than Australia’s

 “Consumers are in an increasingly sound position, which reflects the solid and now sustained lift in economic activity over the past year and the sharp fall in the unemployment rate,” said Stephen Koukoulas, Economic Advisor to Dun & Bradstreet. “The strength in the New Zealand economy is apparent in the fact that consumers are spending and borrowing with confidence,”

Mr Koukoulas added.“While the present situation is strong, the start of the interest rate hiking cycle from the RBNZ may pose some challenges over the more medium term as borrowing costs increase, although the risk of a severe deterioration in consumer financial stress remains low,” Mr Koukoulas added.

This is very good news.

Confidence breeds confidence, creating a virtuous cycle.



				
				

				

			

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: