Blame the media

Trans-Tasman opines:

You can’t say anything critical about the Labour Party at the moment it seems, without being accused of bias. The party’s activists, both at MP and grassroots/social media level, have become extraordinarily chippy and defensive of late. The one big policy initiative this week, the compulsory savings and monetary policy announcement, was accompanied, in finance spokesman David Parker’s speech, by an extraordinary amount of defensive rhetoric about how much the party is being mis-represented.

It is not just the usual politican’s slag-the-media, get-your-retaliation-in-first tactic. There is a genuine and rising tide of bile among Labour folk towards what they feel is a biased and pro-National political media.

Labour keeps doing stupid things, not to report that would be bias.

Bias comes in many forms though: in media matters, the most important is narrative and confirmation bias rather than ideological. If you go back a decade, the narrative bias was Labour’s Helen Clark was all-competent, all-effective, while National had trouble finding its own backside with both hands. If an expectation has been created of a certain type of behaviour, journalists will go looking for it. As a matter of substance, Labour leader David Cunliffe’s bogus claim of a grandfather with a Military Medal is pretty trivial. Most of us have family oral histories with an element of embroidery about them. But against a background of playing too cute with the facts it was asking for trouble.

The medal claim wouldn’t have been perceived so negatively, and covered so widely, had Cunliffe not already had a reputation for gilding the lily.

Most of us are not political leaders, and most of us are not putting such matters of family history into speeches aimed at garnering political support. The only way to counter this bias is to stop doing things which feed it. . .

That doesn’t mean letting media training turn you into an automaton:

 

 

3 Responses to Blame the media

  1. Judge Holden says:

    Yep, the Williamson thing should be all about Cunliffe. The media are absolutely right to run that angle. After all Williamson was just helping out a constituent who didn’t live in his electorate by trying to influence a police investigation. This was after he lobbied hard for him to get citizenship against advice, found a house for him, did maintenance work on that house, had dinners with him and what else do you think? What was the quid pro quo?

    Like

  2. Bulaman says:

    Blame the media?

    No Blame Canada!

    Like

  3. pdm says:

    He is a strange dude is Cunliffe.

    Judge – Williamson helping out constituent you say – just like Philip Field only Williamson will not be before the courts.

    Like

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