$10.4m for sexual violence services

Social Development Minister Paula Bennett and Associate Health Minister Jo Goodhew have announced $10.4 million in new operating funding to support sexual violence services over the next two years.

“This funding boost in Budget 2014 will provide immediate stability for the specialist services providing vital support for New Zealanders and their families impacted by sexual violence,” Mrs Bennett says.

“It is a basic right that people should feel safe and secure and free of fear, which is too often taken away from people through sexual violence.”

“The sector requires extra resourcing, especially around the availability of 24/7 crisis call-out and emergency counselling services.”

The extra funding will include support for:

  • Frontline crisis-response services.
  • Community-based treatment services.
  • Services for male survivors.
  • People accessing medical and forensic services.

“We’re committed to providing the right support for those working with both victims and perpetrators of sexual violence, so that when someone comes to them for help they can provide it,” Mrs Goodhew says.

“This funding, appropriated to Vote Health, provides a shot in the arm to address current funding issues.”

“This is alongside work the Government is doing with the sector on a cross-agency, long-term strategy to make sure sexual violence services are high quality, well-run and sustainable,” Mrs Bennett says.

This includes the development of a nation-wide prevention package, and a committed focus on improving sector development, funding and governance.

“It’s important the sector has financial certainty now, in order to have the security and time to best consider what the long-term approach will contain.”

While crime rates are dropping, the rate of sexual crimes is not.

That could reflect more reporting rather than more actual crimes.

Whichever it is giving victims the help they need and prevention measures are both high priorities.
We’re committed to supporting victims of sexual violence – http://bit.ly/1hRhfcg

25 Responses to $10.4m for sexual violence services

  1. Andrei says:

    Expensive election year bribe for the man hating, feminist,lesbian constituency.

    Like

  2. Mr E says:

    Andrei- You don’t think support for sexual violence victims is necessary?

    Like

  3. Andrei says:

    This would be an example of the Government throwing tax payers money at people with an axe to grind in an election year Mr E.

    And will be used to support them while they grind their axe.

    Like

  4. Mr E says:

    I repeat – You don’t think support for sexual violence victims is necessary?

    Like

  5. Andrei says:

    Discussing “sexual violence” which is a classic example or Orwellian newspeak in a calm, rational and responsible manner is impossible Mr E.

    From the moment Marilyn French claimed “all men are rapists” the conversation has been owned by the politically correct thought police.

    But as a general proposition I do wonder how millions of people born around the time of my parents and including them endured what they endured without “support services”, taxpayer funded or otherwise, to council them through their significant life traumas?

    Like

  6. JC says:

    What I hate is this..

    A woman suffers a home invasion, is beaten within an inch of her life, permanently disabled and traumatised for life. But because she wasn’t raped the best she gets in a disability allowance and some temporary support for her traumas.

    A woman is attacked in her home, raped but otherwise unhurt.. she gets a good chunk of her wages, tens of thousands spent on her mental state and and total support for the rest of her life if deemed needed.. all courtesy of ACC.

    Sexual violence is not and cannot be construed as an “Accident”, it is a crime just like in the first case and often much less traumatic that the first woman above, yet somehow we have allowed a huge inequality of treatment and support to develop.

    This isn’t me making light of rape, but rather pointing out what I think is a major injustice. I’d go further and say that burglary falls into the same category in that it destroys peoples’ sense of home security and can blight lives every bit as badly as more serious assaults.

    IMO these three crimes are quite similar and indeed many rapists start out as burglars because their kicks come as much from the thrill of invasion of space and privacy and person. Victims of burglary sometimes say its like a rape and I can readily see why.

    In assessing these three crimes I think we should start from the same point as rape in considering the seriousness of the impact(s) on the victims but rape should not be part of ACC, that is unjust to the other victims.

    JC

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  7. Mr E says:

    Andrei,
    Do you also wonder what they did before antibiotics and paracetamol?

    “Harden up” is not a phrase that works for everyone Andrei. In my opinion looking after mental health is just important (if not more) than looking after physical health.

    I am a little surprised at your lack of empathy. I am guessing that you are one tough individual. However not everyone is as tough as you. Sweeping their issues under the rug wont help.

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  8. TraceyS says:

    “Sexual violence is a crime just like in the first case and often much less traumatic than the first woman above…”

    “This isn’t me making light of rape, but…”

    “Victims of burglary sometimes say its like a rape and I can readily see why.”

    “I’d go further and say that burglary falls into the same category…[as rape]”

    I’m really glad you’re not in the police or other services that deal with rape and its aftermath, JC. I can just imagine it…there, there, dear, I was burgled back in 1947 and that was terrible too.

    Do you really think that anyone who has been both raped and burgled (on separate occasions) would equate the two experiences comparably?

    You say a “woman is attacked in her home, raped but otherwise unhurt”. Right, so the very real fear, or reality, of being infected with a STD or conceiving a rapist’s child is not “hurt”?

    Andrei, your attitude on this announcement is pretty awful too. A lot has changed since your parents day. A lot! Seems something that hasn’t changed is your last-century attitude along with JC’s.

    Like

  9. Andrei says:

    Seems something that hasn’t changed is your last-century attitude along with JC’s

    The thing about so called “modern” attitudes is that they are inward looking – oh poor me style thinking.

    And people end up feeling so sorry for themselves over their misfortunes they don’t see other peoples misfortunes or needs.

    We live in a shitty world where shitty things happen to us and to others and if we open our eyes to others rather than dwelling on our own wounds then we can give them “therapy” they need with our love and compassion often just by noticing and acknowledging them .

    I actually think we are a self absorbed, self indulgent generation and that is why we are so isolated from one another.

    Like

  10. TraceyS says:

    When I was sixteen and at work on a Friday evening an intoxicated man came into the shop (where I was working by myself). He lunged across the counter said what filthy things he wanted to do to me. I swayed out of his reach and got down to the back office where the manager was and he called the police who were there almost instantly.

    What if I’d not gotten away? Would my life have followed the same path? I can’t be sure, but have a fair idea that it wouldn’t have. I don’t remember having any support later but did take a while to get over it.

    The ironic thing was that the man turned out to be an old friend of my father who thought the whole thing was a bit of a joke and that I shouldn’t have allowed the police to press charges, which they did, and the guy had his day in court. Dad probably went and had a beer with him afterwards to have a good ol’ catch up.

    The man was ordered by the Court to write an apology. He did and I have never opened it.

    Now I have had my car broken into, our business, but never our home fortunately. Being burgled is not in the same category as sexual violence or even the threat thereof. Burglary does feel like an invasion. It is an invasion but no way is in in the same category as a sexual invasion.

    Like

  11. TraceyS says:

    I actually think you are doing a lot to isolate yourself Andrei.

    But now that I’m over my incident perhaps I should look up the bugger who had a go at me and find out if HE needs some “therapy”? Almost certainly he did and still does.

    I suppose I ought to be thankful he didn’t go further so as to f*** my life up, and my subsequent success means I can now even afford to pay for his therapy too.

    If that would make YOU feel less isolated.

    There is no need to be isolated in this day and age. But it must be hard to avoid if you are a biggot

    Like

  12. Mr E says:

    Andrei – I’m not sure where you are coming from at all. I usually try to understand others point of view with an open mind, but I’m struggling with yours.

    I think people are possibly more self aware than they used to be?. But to say self absorbed – I don’t think so.

    Also we don’t live in a sh…y world, not in my view at least.

    I think we live in an amazing world that contains some imperfections. Some are luckier to be more isolated from those imperfections than others. Those that are close to the imperfections – see the world from a whole different perspective. Often the strain of those imperfections can lead to mental health challenges, and this can twist the world into a ‘very sad place’ so to speak.

    Like some I have struggled through what I consider to be undiagnosed or perhaps subclinical depression through my younger years. From this experience I can say that my view of the world was very different from what it is now. Reflecting, I can now say that the dark was darker and the light was non existent. The opposite of rose tinted glasses I think. I now recognise it as a mental health issue and I empathise strongly for those that go through such times.

    Victims of crime can be faced with challenges to their mental health and supportive behaviour is needed by ALL to move them through this. I would say dismissive behaviour does little to improve the situation of those folks.

    Are victims of sexual violence likely to face significant mental health challenges? I’m no expert but it is fair to say my expectation would be – absolutely and undeniably.

    There has been an increase in the number of sexual crimes reported. To dismiss victims of this crime would not be helpful at all.

    Like

  13. JC says:

    “Seems something that hasn’t changed is your last-century attitude along with JC’s.”

    In reality your comments make my point about the perversity of separating rape from other home invasions. Consider I said that one woman was “beaten within an inch of her life, permanently disabled and traumatised for life”.

    And you seem to be saying “Oh, she wasn’t raped therefore doesn’t need or deserve the same money and support as the uninjured rape victim”.

    Or take the burglary that puts the children in the house in constant fear of an invasion for many years thereafter.

    I was at pains not to downrate rape, rather I thought I was explicitly upgrading the other two cases into the same category as rape because they can have quite similar effects and in the case of the woman permanently disabled its clear to me that she is shamefully treated in comparison with the rape victim.

    I could have added that ACC can now fund and support people who have witnessed an accident but have suffered no injury whatsoever. Where on Earth is the justice in that for the beaten and disabled woman.

    JC

    Like

  14. Paranormal says:

    JC

    I understand where you’re coming from re the different treatments.

    In answer to your concern over ACC funding those that have witnessed an accident. I wasn’t aware this had changed but can understand why that might be. This may be more about closing a loophole than anything else.

    Following the death of his wife in 1999 on the Shotover Jet an American tourist successfully sued Shotover Jet for $1,000,000 claiming mental injury from seeing it happen. As he was not physically injured ACC did not apply so he was free to sue. As you say this is now covered under ACC I assume it is to stop similar private actions.

    Like

  15. TraceyS says:

    I asked two questions, JC:

    1) Do you really think that anyone who has been both raped and burgled (on separate occasions) would equate the two experiences comparably?

    2) You say a “woman is attacked in her home, raped but otherwise unhurt”. Right, so the very real fear, or reality, of being infected with a STD or conceiving a rapist’s child is not “hurt”?

    In the absence of a direct response from you, can I assume the answer to both is “yes”?

    Like

  16. JC says:

    OK, your two questions..

    1. I’m saying they both are in the same category of invasion and that the Courts will sort out the relative harm(s) that have been suffered and impose the appropriate penalty.. a penalty for burglary terrifyingly inadequate for the mental harm it can cause.

    But never will I accept rape is a workplace “accident” and to the best of my knowledge the rest of the world doesn’t either. Rape is a crime pure and simple but it does not necessarily create as much harm as other forms of invasion and battery. For example husband or partner rape might cause some pain and massive humiliation etc but it is not per se worse than a person being battered with an iron bar and left paralyzed for life. To say otherwise is a perversion in a civilised country.

    2. STDs and pregnancy are treatable, permanent disability is not. The mental harm to a child as a result of burglary may be worse than some or even many rapes.. it depends on the individual. Again its up to the Courts to make those judgements based on all the facts and the mental harm caused.

    JC

    Like

  17. Andrei says:

    See JC – I did warn above you enter this debate at your peril and run the risk of having various epithets favoured by the thought police thrown at you if you stray from the reservation of rigid conformity demanded of those who have framed the debate.

    Like

  18. TraceyS says:

    “…never will I accept rape is a workplace “accident” and to the best of my knowledge the rest of the world doesn’t either.”

    And I’m pretty sure that “the world” doesn’t regard my nephew’s shoulder dislocation while water skiing as a workplace accident either. But still it is covered by ACC. So which is worse?

    What peril Andrei?

    The only real risk you run in this conversation is having your mindset challenged. And no one is forcing you…

    Like

  19. Andrei says:

    There is no need to be isolated in this day and age. But it must be hard to avoid if you are a biggot

    See you deployed the “B” word a perennial favourite of the indoctrinated

    Like

  20. TraceyS says:

    There lies the peril Andrei. To be faced with, and more importantly, to deal with the affront of terms such as “indoctrinated” or “bigoted”.

    And we can only get those answers about ourselves from within. In what Mr E called “self awareness”. Generally, women are better at this than men.

    I may be indoctrinated, you may be bigoted, maybe neither definition is correct. All that really matters is that we are capable of looking within ourselves for answers.

    You might call this self-absorption. But it may just be critical for more, rather than fewer, people to do this in order to stem the rising tide of sexual crimes.

    Far from being the “thought police”, this is just encouraging people to question why they think a certain way or have formed particular views. Appreciate it is harder for some…

    Like

  21. Mr E says:

    JC – you were being rude. Recognise it. Apologise, move on.
    Tracey, don’t be so sensitive. Bloggers can be crass, it is unavoidable. Challenge, then laugh it off. I think JC is baiting you.

    Andrei. I have no advice for you. You seem beyond my advice.

    Mr E, who are you to advise anyone?

    Like

  22. TraceyS says:

    Mr E – I took JC at face value. Might be wrong, but despite not agreeing, I thought he was quite sincere. Would’t say his comments were rude, but rather revealing.

    If you go back to the original post and what it is about I shake my head that anyone could take issue with it. There is a need for additional funding and it is being met. The statistics provide the evidence of the need.

    The logical argument to the “election bribe” suggestion is why did the government not increase funding sooner? It is also the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff. What are we going to do to reduce these crimes? Keep increasing the number of ambulances?

    Why be sensitive about this issue? Well consider for a moment the people working in the agencies to receive additional funding, many of whom will have been victims of sexual violence themselves. Suggesting they’re being bought is incredibly disempowering and that is the opposite to what is needed.

    Like

  23. Andrei says:

    Tracey these people are an advocacy group with a particular world view who are peddling a quasi religious response to what is a universal need that is not met in a Godless secular society.

    Like

  24. TraceyS says:

    Similar to what you do, just a different response.

    Like

  25. Andrei says:

    Similar to what you do, just a different response?

    You mean the Government is about to give me a cool 10.4 million smackeroos to advocate my way of being in this world?

    I await with baited breath

    Like

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