How rumours start

May 1, 2014

Idiot/Savant at No Right Turn posts:

And then there’s this bit:

In a statement, Prime Minister John Key says he’s accepted Mr Williamson’s resignation.

“I have been made aware that Mr Williamson contacted Police some time ago regarding their investigation of Mr Donghua Liu,” Mr Key said.

Which raises the other obvious question: why didn’t Key sack him then? . . .  Or is corrupt behaviour only punished if it becomes public? . . .

IS has mis-read the sentence.

He doesn’t allow comments so I’m correcting him here.

The sentence means that the PM knows that the contact with the police was some time ago not that he’s known for some time.

If he’d known for a while he’d have said:

 I was made aware some time ago that  . . .

This is how rumours start. Someone misreads what someone says and accuses them of doing something wrong.

The wrong in this case is in the reading, and interpretation of that, by the writer not the actions of the speaker.


Word of the day

May 1, 2014

Bruit – to spread (a report or rumour) widely; report, voice abroad; a report or rumour; a sound, especially an abnormal one, heard through a stethoscope; a murmur.


Rural round-up

May 1, 2014

China’s taste for hotpot elevates lamb flaps from offcut to prime cut, sending prices to record – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – China’s taste for hotpot, where meat and vegetables are cooked in a broth at the dining table, has driven a four-fold increase in the price of lamb flaps, turning the offcut into a premium cut and lifting the overall return kiwi farmers can get from their animals.

Lamb flaps, the gristly ends of the ribs trimmed away when the butcher cuts racks and rib chops, used to be considered a cheap cut, retailing for about US$1.35 per kilogram as little as eight years ago. It has soared 84 percent to US$5.84/kg, overtaking shoulder at US$5.64/kg and narrowing the gap with lamb leg at US$8.12/kg, based on Agrifax data.

In China, the meat is processed into a lamb roll and sliced thinly for hotpot, the dominant cooking style for lamb and a staple of the national diet. Chinese sheepmeat imports nearly doubled to 165,300 tonnes in the 2013 export year as a growing population, higher incomes and a decline in the world’s largest sheep flock spurred demand for imported protein. . .

New Zealand companies approved for infant formula exporting to China:

Five New Zealand manufacturers have been approved for exporting infant formula to China, Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy and Food Safety Minister Nikki Kaye have announced today.

“These manufacturers represent around 90% of our infant formula exports to China by volume,” says Mr Guy.

“New Zealand officials have been working intensively with manufacturers and Chinese officials to address corrective actions, allowing these five manufacturers to be registered as of May 1.

“We appreciate the cooperative relationship with Chinese authorities in registering these New Zealand manufacturers. The new rules signal China’s desire for greater accountability for imported infant formula from all countries.

“MPI is working with all manufacturers to ensure the new Overseas Market Access Requirement (OMAR) – issued last night – is complied with. This sets out the requirements needed to produce infant formula for export to China from 1 May,” says Mr Guy. . . .

Nutricia takeover targets Sutton Group, Gardians among first to get China registration – Suze Metherell:

(BusinessDesk) – Sutton Group and Gardians, the dairy manufacturers acquired by Danone’s Nutricia arm, are among infant formula companies to gain registration to export to China under that nation’s new food safety regulations.

Nutricia itself gained registration, as did Fonterra Cooperative Group, GMP Pharmaceuticals and Dairy Goat Cooperative (NZ). They represent about 90 percent of New Zealand’s infant formula exports to China by volume.

Other companies can be registered after the May 1 deadline although owners of infant formula brands who can’t demonstrate a close relationship with a manufacturer may struggle to meet Chinese requirements, Food Safety Minister Nikki Kaye said today. . .

Nutricia to Add Milk Drying and Packing Capacity to Existing Platform in New Zealand:

Nutricia today announces an agreement for the simultaneous acquisition of the spray dryer of Gardians, located near Balclutha, and the blending, packing and can-forming activities of the Sutton Group in Auckland.

This transaction will provide Nutricia with a large milk drying capacity, along with a long-term fresh milk supply access. It will also add an infant formula blending and packing facility to Nutricia’s existing operations platform. . . .

Dairy Herd Consultation Underway:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has today announced consultation on the future direction of the dairy herd improvement industry.

“The government’s main objective is to ensure New Zealand’s dairy industry can benefit from genetic gain in the national dairy herd. This objective supports the National Breeding Objective to identify animals whose progeny will be the most efficient converters of feed into farmer profit, says Marianne Lukkien, Acting Director Sector Policy.

“To achieve this we need to ensure the Dairy Core Database is fit for purpose, services are accessible at competitive prices and above all farmer’s interests are protected.

“The dairy industry is preparing for the transfer of the Dairy Core Database from Livestock Improvement Corporation (LIC) to DairyNZ. . .

A new generation of tools for the primary sector:

The primary sector is facing a major evolution in how they operate their businesses. Whether its satellite imagery of plantation forests, GPS tracking and real-time scheduling of transport and logistics, soil management through wireless sensor monitoring and automated tractor or irrigation systems, our primary sector businesses have a lot to benefit from improved mobile technologies.

Some of the best minds in New Zealand and Australia came together last year in Wellington for this region’s inaugural MobileTECH Summit 2013, an event designed to discuss and showcase new mobile technologies best suited to increase productivity for the primary sector. Building on this momentum, MobileTECH 2014 will be running this year in Brisbane, Australia and again, in Auckland, New Zealand in August. . .

Chinese buy five vineyards

Hong Kong-owned QWIL and Accolade Wines have been given the go ahead by the Overseas Investment Office to buy five vineyards from Mud House Wines.

The deal for $46.4 million involves the acquisition by QWIL of a freehold interest in five vineyards – Woolshed Vineyard in Marlborough, Home, Mound and Deans Vineyards in Canterbury, and Claim Vineyard in Otago.

The land comprises about 596ha. . . .

 


Thursday’s quiz

May 1, 2014

1. Who said: “The only time to eat diet food is while you’re waiting for the steak to cook.”  ?

2. Who wrote The Grapes of Wrath?

3. It’s chou in French, cavolo in Italian,  repollo in Spanish and kāpeti in Maori – what is it in English?

4. What is a  mangelwurzel?

5. If you could eat only one fruit and one vegetable which would they be?


Mike Moore resigning

May 1, 2014

Mike Moore, New Zealand’s ambassador tot he USA is stepping down:

NZ’s premier political weekly Trans-Tasman has revealed Mike Moore, NZ’s ambassador to the US in Washington DC, is to stand down shortly, ending an extraordinary career in political and public life spanning more than 40 years. Moore lives politics and global business. He entered Parliament with the 1972 Norman Kirk Labour Govt and rose through the ranks from back-bencher to cabinet Minister and somewhat-briefly, Prime Minister.

Trans Tasman’s Editors note Moore earned the respect of hard-nosed National Ministers, including John Key and Foreign Minister Murray McCully, who recognised his international reputation and negotiating skills, scarcely acknowledged in NZ, had gained wide respect in world capitals, not least in Washington. Hence his appointment to the NZ Embassy in Observatory Circle in Washington when McCully shrewdly recognised his Labour credentials would add weight to the drive to secure a raft of international trade agreements with a Democratic president in the White House.

Trans Tasman says McCully is considering appointing a career diplomat to succeed Moore, in part because his skill-set is difficult to replace and also because of the constraints of the general election.

Mike Moore gained the title Minister for Lamburgers for his efforts to promote lamb when he was an MP.

He worked hard for free trade as director-general of the World Trade Organisation, earning cross-party admiration for doing so.

He has been our USA ambassador since 2010.


Maurice Williamson resigns as Minister

May 1, 2014

Prime Minister John Key has accepted Maurice Williamson’s resignation from Cabinet:

 “I have been made aware that Mr Williamson contacted Police some time ago regarding their investigation of Mr Donghua Liu,” Mr Key says.

“Mr Williamson has assured me that he did not in any way intend to influence the Police investigation.

“However, Mr Williamson’s decision to discuss the investigation with Police was a significant error of judgement.

“The independence of Police investigations is a fundamental part of our country’s legal framework.

“Mr Williamson’s actions have been very unwise as they have the potential to bring that independence into question.

“I have advised the Governor General to accept Mr Williamson’s resignation as a Minister.

Mr Key said he will appoint a new Minister outside Cabinet early next week and in the meantime, Nick Smith will act in the Building and Construction portfolio, Nathan Guy in Land Information, and Simon Bridges in Customs and Statistics.

The Minister has done the right thing by resigning from Cabinet for this error of judgement.

The resignation is as a minister, he is still the MP for Pakuranga.


Case for fewer restrictions on foreign investment

May 1, 2014

The New Zealand Initiative wants fewer restrictions on foreign direct investment:

New Zealand affords itself the luxury of treating overseas investment as a privilege rather than as a necessary and desirable means of better integrating ourselves with the world, so as to make the most of what it has to offer.

That blinkered attitude permeates our regulatory regime, which the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development assesses to be more restrictive than the regimes of 47 other countries out of a total of 53 countries.

This a a strong contradiction of the oppositions parties’ stance that our regimes aren’t restrictive enough.

Before international investors can deploy their capital they must find out if their planned investment concerns assets deemed sensitive.

Prior approval is required for such investments and the definition of a sensitive asset is very broad indeed.

For example, every parcel of non-urban land greater than 5 hectares is deemed to be sensitive, no matter how swampy, erosion prone, or barren, and perhaps 99% of New Zealand’s land cover is non-urban.

If their planned investment is deemed to be in a sensitive asset we absurdly subject foreign investors to tests of character, relevant business experience and acumen and financial commitment.

These are not tests that politicians are known for applying to themselves when investing taxpayers’ money, and neither are they tests that apply to local investors.

Regardless, one would have thought that the intention to invest real money buying the asset in question was in itself proof of financial commitment.

The intention to invest is proof of financial commitment but there is a place for tests of character and relevant business experience too. We don’t, for example, want to import the proceeds of crime.

As the Treasury has repeatedly pointed out, if the concern is with how the asset might be used, then this is a use question, not an ownership question, and all overseas investors must comply with exactly the same rules and regulations that apply to any asset use in New Zealand anyway.

All investors should comply with the same rules.

The Overseas Investment does ask a lot more of foreign investors for example granting public access through farmland that a domestic investor wouldn’t have to do.

That can result in public good, it could also put off foreign investors who would take their money elsewhere.

Our regime is at its most absurd when the investment is in so-called sensitive land and the investor does not intend to live in New Zealand indefinitely. In this case, the law requires the relevant minister or ministers to be satisfied that the overseas investment will benefit New Zealand. The catch is that the primary benefit – the sale proceeds to a New Zealand vendor, are not counted as a benefit. Yet, if securing that benefit was not the prime reason for selling, what was?

This regime is not only bureaucratic overkill; it actually harms New Zealand.

The world’s best companies and innovators do not have to invest in New Zealand. If we put hurdles in their way, they can simply shrug their shoulders and invest elsewhere. That makes our international links weaker, our assets worth less, and our country more of a global backwater. This is the core message of our newly released report Open for Business – Removing the barriers to international investment.

In very limited, particular cases there may be good reasons to be careful about foreign investment, but reasons based on emotional, anti-foreigner sentiment do not make the cut.

After all, most New Zealanders are the descendants of immigrants.

National security issues are widely regarded internationally as a good reason, yet New Zealand’s regulatory regime has little or nothing to do with national security.

Reciprocity is a further reason for why the Overseas Investment Act needs to be reformed. Few would want to see New Zealanders treated unfairly when trying to buy a property or business overseas, so why do the same at home?

We are hypocritically applying double-standards when we believe we should be freely able to invest overseas, yet put obstacles in foreign investors’ ways.

As we highlighted in our previous report Capital Doldrums, New Zealand also stands out unfavourably internationally for the slump in its ranking for investment attractiveness.

New Zealand ranks highly in most international comparisons but falls short in this important one.

A regime that is hostile to investment is a threat to New Zealanders’ future living standards.

Our standard of living depends on being competitive in world markets for goods and capital. We can exploit economies of scale through world trade, and we can maintain competitiveness and improve productivity if we continually tap into the technology and expertise of the world’s best firms. If we do that well, New Zealanders can enjoy the best the world has to offer and great job prospects – without emigrating.

Certainly, there is no case for gloom. We rank very highly on some measures of international competitiveness, and we are still attracting overseas investors. A Treasury working paper has estimated that imported capital between 1996 and 2006 cumulatively raised our incomes by $2,600 per worker and wealth per capita by $14,000 in 2007 prices.

Nevertheless, we need to excel in policy settings across the board if we are to offset the disadvantages of size and distance.

In our new report, we examine New Zealand’s regime in considerable depth, drawing heavily on Treasury’s far-ranging review of the regime’s shortcomings and policy options in 2009–10. The picture that emerges from their and our research is a disturbing anti-investment bias in our legislation – without actually offering any good public policy reasons for its main features.

An anti-investment bias without good public policy is stupid.

After more than two years of research on this issue, our conclusion is this: New Zealand’s regime represents a muddled, overly bureaucratic response to an ill-identified problem.

We believe that the starting presumption for a fit-for-purpose regime should be that asset transactions between a willing buyer and a willing seller should proceed unless there is a good public interest reason otherwise.

If an otherwise legitimate transaction is to be stopped for the benefit of the public at large, the costs of achieving that benefit should not fall unfairly or unduly on the asset owner. This means respecting the would-be vendor’s property rights and addressing the issue of compensation, if appropriate.

Those opposing foreign investment never take into account the vendors and what good they can then do with the money they receive. Nor do they think of the cost delaying or prohibiting a sale might impose on them.

We believe that the onus of proof for keeping our highly regulated FDI regime is on those who want to keep it.

If other countries can do well with much lower levels of regulation, we are also capable of doing the same.

This means that we should be treating domestic and foreign direct investors the same – and we should be treating foreign investors in the same way we wish to be treated as investors abroad.

New Zealand should be open for business. We need to remove the barriers to foreign investors. We have nothing to lose from such openness but much to gain.

Oversight of foreign investment is sensible and I am not averse to some restrictions.

But restrictions which cause problems for no good reason are detrimental to individuals and the economy.

 


$10.4m for sexual violence services

May 1, 2014

Social Development Minister Paula Bennett and Associate Health Minister Jo Goodhew have announced $10.4 million in new operating funding to support sexual violence services over the next two years.

“This funding boost in Budget 2014 will provide immediate stability for the specialist services providing vital support for New Zealanders and their families impacted by sexual violence,” Mrs Bennett says.

“It is a basic right that people should feel safe and secure and free of fear, which is too often taken away from people through sexual violence.”

“The sector requires extra resourcing, especially around the availability of 24/7 crisis call-out and emergency counselling services.”

The extra funding will include support for:

  • Frontline crisis-response services.
  • Community-based treatment services.
  • Services for male survivors.
  • People accessing medical and forensic services.

“We’re committed to providing the right support for those working with both victims and perpetrators of sexual violence, so that when someone comes to them for help they can provide it,” Mrs Goodhew says.

“This funding, appropriated to Vote Health, provides a shot in the arm to address current funding issues.”

“This is alongside work the Government is doing with the sector on a cross-agency, long-term strategy to make sure sexual violence services are high quality, well-run and sustainable,” Mrs Bennett says.

This includes the development of a nation-wide prevention package, and a committed focus on improving sector development, funding and governance.

“It’s important the sector has financial certainty now, in order to have the security and time to best consider what the long-term approach will contain.”

While crime rates are dropping, the rate of sexual crimes is not.

That could reflect more reporting rather than more actual crimes.

Whichever it is giving victims the help they need and prevention measures are both high priorities.
We’re committed to supporting victims of sexual violence – http://bit.ly/1hRhfcg


Brett Hudson Nat candidate for Ohariu

May 1, 2014

National Party members have selected Brett Hudson as their candidate for Ohariu.

“I congratulate Brett on his selection and look forward to working with him,” said Regional Chair Malcolm Plimmer.

“Brett brings a good understanding of Wellington issues and great real world experience to the role.”

Mr Hudson said he was honoured to be selected and will be working hard to secure strong support for National.

“National is working hard and delivering real progress for New Zealand families,” said Mr Hudson.

“Ohariu constituents strongly backed National’s return to Government in 2011. I’ll be focussed on growing that support for John Key and National in 2014.”

Brett Hudson – Biographical Notes

Brett Hudson is a Wellington-based Information and Communications Technology professional.

His experience includes sales and account leadership roles with multi-national organisations (Oracle, IBM, and TelstraClear) and with Kiwi company Starfish Consulting.

His experience drives an interest in using technology to help Kiwi businesses grow and employ.

Brett lives in Karori with his partner, Lindsay Renwick. He has three teenage daughters.

Ohariu is held be United Future’s Peter Dunne but National wins the party vote.

 

 

 


May 1 in history

May 1, 2014

305  Diocletian and Maximian retired from the office of Roman Emperor.

880 The Nea Ekklesia was inaugurated in Constantinople setting the model for all later cross-in-square Orthodox churches.

1328  Wars of Scottish Independence ended: Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton – the Kingdom of England recognised the Kingdom of Scotland as an independent state.

1576 Stefan Batory, the reigning Prince of Transylvania, married Anna Jagiellon and they became the co-rulers of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

1707 The Act of Union joined the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

1751 The first cricket match was played in America.

1753 Publication of Species Plantarum by Linnaeus, and the formal start date of plant taxonomy adopted by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.

1759 Josiah Wedgwood founded the Wedgwood pottery company in Great Britain.

1776 Establishment of the Illuminati in Ingolstadt (Upper Bavaria), by Jesuit-taught Adam Weishaupt.

1778 American Revolution: The Battle of Crooked Billet began in Hatboro, Pennsylvania.

1785  Kamehameha, the king of Hawaiʻi defeated Kalanikupule and established the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi.

1786  Opening night of the opera The Marriage of Figaro by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Vienna.

1831 Emily Stowe, Canadian physician and suffragist, was born (d. 1903).

1834  The British colonies abolished slavery.

1840  The Penny Black, the first official adhesive postage stamp, was issued in the United Kingdom.

1846  The few remaining Mormons left in Nauvoo, Illinois, formally dedicated the Nauvoo Temple.

1848 The Fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta was founded at Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.

1851 Queen Victoria opened the Great Exhibition in London.

1852 Calamity Jane, American Wild West performer, was born (d. 1903).

1852 The Philippine peso was introduced into circulation.

1863  American Civil War: The Battle of Chancellorsville began.

1865 The Empire of Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay signed the Treaty of the Triple Alliance.

1869 The Folies Bergère opened in Paris.

1875 Alexandra Palace reopened after the 1873 fire burnt it down.

1884  Proclamation of the demand for eight-hour workday in the United States.

1884 Moses Fleetwood Walker became the first black person to play in a professional baseball game in the United States.

1885 Ralph Stackpole, American sculptor, painter, was born  (d. 1973).

1886 Rallies, that ended in the Haymarket affair, were held throughout the United States demanding the eight-hour work day.

1893 The World’s Columbian Exposition opened in Chicago.

1893 Richard Seddon became Premier of New Zealand.

Richard Seddon becomes Premier

1894 Coxey’s Army, the first significant American protest march, arrived in Washington, D.C.

1898  Spanish-American War: The Battle of Manila Bay – the United States Navy destroyed the Spanish Pacific fleet in the first battle of the war.

1900 The Scofield mine disaster killed more than 200 men in Scofield, Utah.

1901 The Pan-American Exposition opened in Buffalo, New York.

1910 Dr. J. Allen Hynek, Astronomer/Astro-physicist. Noted UFO investigator, was born  (d. 1986).

1915  The RMS Lusitania departed from New York City on her two hundred and second, and final, crossing of the North Atlantic.

1925 The All-China Federation of Trade Unions was officially founded.

1926 New Zealand Railways magazine was launched.

NZ Railways Magazine launched

1927 The first cooked meals on a scheduled flight were introduced on an Imperial Airways flight from London to Paris.

1927  The Union Labor Life Insurance Company was founded by the American Federation of Labor.

1930 The dwarf planet Pluto was officially named.

1931 The Empire State Building was dedicated in New York City.

1937  Una Stubbs, English actress, was born.

1939 Judy Collins, American folk singer, was born.

1940 The 1940 Summer Olympics were cancelled owing to war.

1941 – World War II: German forces launch a major attack on Tobruk.

1945 World War II: A German newsreader officially announced that Adolf Hitler had “fallen at his command post in the Reich Chancellery fighting to the last breath against Bolshevism and for Germany”.

1945  Yougoslav partisans freed Trieste.

1945  Rita Coolidge, American singer, was born.

1946  Joanna Lumley, English actress, was born.

1946 Start of 3 year Pilbara strike of Indigenous Australians.

1946 The Paris Peace Conference concluded that the islands of the Dodecanese should be returned to Greece by Italy.

1947 Portella della Ginestra massacre against May Day celebrations in Sicily by the bandit and separatist leader Salvatore Giuliano; 11 people were killed and 33 wounded.

1948 The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) was established, with Kim Il-sung as president.

1950  Guam was organized as a United States commonwealth.

1955 – Flight Lieutenant Stuart McIntyre, led the RNZAF’s first combat strike since the conclusion of the Second World War.

1956  The polio vaccine developed by Jonas Salk was made available to the public.

1956  A doctor in Japan reported an “epidemic of an unknown disease of the central nervous system”, marking the official discovery of Minamata disease.

1960 Formation of the western Indian states of Gujarat and Maharashtra.

1960  Cold War: U-2 incidentFrancis Gary Powers, in a Lockheed U-2 spyplane, iwa shot down over the Soviet Union, sparking a diplomatic crisis.

1961 The Prime Minister of Cuba, Fidel Castro, proclaimed Cuba a socialist nation and abolishes elections.

1965 Battle of Dong-Yin, a naval conflict between ROC and PRC, took place.

1970  Protests erupted in Seattle, Washington, following the announcement by U.S. President Richard Nixon that U.S. Forces in Vietnam would pursue enemy troops into Cambodia, a neutral country.

1971 Amtrak (the National Railroad Passenger Corporation) was formed to take over U.S. passenger rail service.

1977 36 people were killed in Taksim Square, Istanbul, during the Labour Day celebrations.

1978 Japan’s Naomi Uemura, travelling by dog sled, became the first person to reach the North Pole alone.

1982 The 1982 World’s Fair opened in Knoxville, Tennessee.

1982 Operation Black Buck: The Royal Air Force attacked the Argentine Air Force during Falklands War.

1983 Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis was awarded the Lenin Peace Prize.

1987 Pope John Paul II beatified Edith Stein, a Jewish-born Carmelite nun who was gassed in the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz.

1989 Disney-MGM Studios opened at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Florida.

1990 The former Philippine Episcopal Church (supervised by the Episcopal Church of the United States of America) was granted full autonomy and raised to the states of an Autocephalous Anglican Province and renamed the Episcopal Church of the Philippines.

1992 On the third day of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, African-American activist, criminal, and victim of police beating Rodney King appeared in public before television news cameras to appeal for calm and plead for peace, asking, “People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along?”.

1994  Three-time Formula One world champion Ayrton Senna was killed in an accident during the San Marino Grand Prix at Imola.

1995 Croatian forces launch Operation Flash during the Croatian War of Independence.

1997  Tasmania became the last state in Australia to decriminalize homosexuality.

2001 Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo declared the existence of “a state of rebellion”, hours after thousands of supporters of her arrested predecessor, Joseph Estrada, stormed towards the presidential palace at the height of the EDSA III rebellion.

2003 2003 invasion of Iraq: In the “Mission Accomplished” speech, on board the USS Abraham Lincoln (off the coast of California), U.S. President George W. Bush declared that “major combat operations in Iraq have ended”.

2004 Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia joined the European Union, celebrated at the residence of the Irish President in Dublin.

2006  The Puerto Rican government closed the Department of Education and 42 other government agencies owing to to significant shortages in cash flow.

2007  the Los Angeles May Day mêlée occurred, in which the Los Angeles Police Department’s response to a May Day pro-immigration rally become a matter of controversy.

2008 The London Agreement on translation of European patents, concluded in 2000, entered into force in 14 of the 34 Contracting States to the European Patent Convention.

2009 Same-sex marriage was legalised in Sweden.

2010 – attempted car bombing of Times Square.

2011 – Pope John Paul II was beatified by his successor, Pope Benedict XVI.

2011 – Barack Obama announced that Osama bin Laden, the suspected mastermind behind the September 11 attacks was killed by United States special forces in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Sourced from NZ History Online and Wikipedia.


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