Todd Barclay Nat candidate for Clutha Sthlnd

April 27, 2014

National Party members in Clutha Southland have selected Todd Barclay as their candidate for September’s election.

Todd Barclay was raised in Dipton and Gore, and at just 24 years old has established a strong mix of public and private sector experience in the public relations industry.

Working in Wellington and then Auckland, Todd worked for Bill English and cabinet ministers Hekia Parata and Gerry Brownlee. He left Parliament to work for one of New Zealand’s leading public relations consultancies, before taking on a role as Corporate Affairs Manager for Philip Morris.

Todd went to Gore High School, and studied at Victoria University of Wellington. He holds a Bachelor of Commerce in Commercial Law.

Clutha Southland is the country’s largest general electorate, covering 38,247 square kilometres.

It has been well served by Bill English who will be standing on the party list only.

He wasn’t much older than Todd when he first entered parliament 24 years ago.

Delegates have chosen a young candidate to succeed him and he will be working hard to not just win the seat, which will get him into parliament, but maximise the party vote which will ensure he’s in a John Key-led government.


Word of the day

April 27, 2014

Olitory – 0f or pertaining to, or produced in, a kitchen garden; of or relating to culinary herbs or kitchen vegetables; used for kitchen purposes.


Rural round-up

April 27, 2014

‘Incredibly high’ NZ land prices divert Aquila to Australia – Agrimoney:

The “incredibly high” prices of New Zealand dairy farms have prompted Aquila Capital to switch its investment drive to Australia, where the dairy sector offers “the best risk-adjusted returns in global agriculture”.

The alterative asset manager, which in all sectors has assets approaching $10bn, said it was in agriculture keeping dairy as its priority investment area, citing the support to the market from strong growth in Asian consumption.

“[This] might lead to a potential demand overhang for dairy products of as much as 5bn litres by 2020,” said Detlef Schoen, head of farm investments at German-based Aquila, citing analysis of OECD data. . . .

Opinion: New Zealand dairy investment isn’t such a bad bet – Agrimoney:

I was most interested in the comments by Aquila on Agrimoney.com comparing returns from Australian and New Zealand dairy farms.

Aquila made some interesting points in favour of Australia. However, I believe that New Zealand remains the better target for investment.

Land price comparatives

Land prices – whether one country’s land prices are higher or lower than another country’s is neither here nor there. It is the current and expected long term sustainable economic returns that matter and on this basis New Zealand dairy land prices quite justifiably need to be higher than Australia’s. . . .

Environmental pressure threat to pasture farming – Gerry Eckhoff :

The publication of passionate articles extolling the virtues of a given system or company needs to be tempered with a dose of reality.

One such article was by Leonie Guiney, under the headline “We abandon pasture farming at our peril – returning farmer” (FW, February 24).

I would agree with the sentiment expressed, but the real reason for the move to herd homes and/or the emotive factory farming of dairy cows – environmental pressure – was not even mentioned by Ms Guiney.

One of the major causes is so well known but is almost impossible to fix.

That is the urine patch, which deposits the equivalent of 1000 kilograms a hectare. . .

Export lamb prices offset fall in volume – Alan Williams:

Higher export lamb values have more than offset a fall in volume in the first half of the trading year, with prices continuing to rise.

The average value per tonne of product rose 14% over the six months to March 31, compared with a near 9% lift in the first three months ended December 31, Beef + Lamb New Zealand data show.

Mutton average values also rose 14% over the period, building on a 5% lift in the first three months.

“What we’re seeing is an increase in value, growing faster as time went on,” B+LNZ chief economist Andrew Burtt said.

Despite the relatively high NZ dollar, the “macro” economic environment was favourable and the outlook for prices still strong, he said. . . .

No confidence vote for straw in dairy cows – Sue O’Dowd:

Dairy farmers who add straw to their cows’ diet would be better off taking up yachting, says a rumen specialist.

Lincoln University expert Jim Gibbs spoke to about 100 farmers at DairyNZ’s FeedRight roadshow at the Westpac Taranaki Agricultural Research Station (WTARS) at Hawera last week.

Gibbs said adding straw to a pasture-based diet was a waste of money. Not one study showed an increase in milk production when straw was added.

“You’re replacing something that has an ME (metabolisable energy) of 12 with one that has an ME of 6 or 8. You’ll see either a loss of production or no change. . .

North Island-wide facial eczema warning – Gerald Piddock:

North Island farmers have been warned to check their stock for signs of facial eczema following a sharp jump in spore numbers from the fungus that causes this disease among livestock.

The disease is caused by spores from the fungus Pithomyces chartarum, which live in pasture and produce a spore containing a toxin that causes liver and bile-duct damage to livestock when eaten.

The high spore counts were the result of high soil temperatures and recent wet weather, AsureQuality facial eczema monitoring co-ordinator Leo Cooney said.

”There is a combination there that is a recipe for disaster.” . . .

Love transcends language bar – Charlotte Squire:

A Mongolian and Kiwi couple living in Golden Bay have literally created their own love language.

Golden Bay born Zoe Leetch met her future husband Enkhnasan Chuluunbaatar in 2008 on a Mongolian goldmine on the northern edge of the Gobi Desert. The pair, who then worked together on the mine, taught each other English and Mongolian, and eventually created their own unique language blend of the two languages.

These days they live in Golden Bay with their young son Tushinbayar Enkhnasan. Enkhnasan, who is known as Nasa, is now a busy sheep shearer, who came second in the intermediate section of the Golden Bay A&P Show sheep shearing champs. It took some time for Nasa, who grew up in a family of nomadic herders, to become a Kiwi sheep shearer. . .


Packets of Light

April 27, 2014

Open large picture

These are little packets of light & you need to plant them early in the year & remember to mark where they were because lots of times they look like weeds in the beginning & it’s not until later that you see how beautiful they really are.

©2014 Brian Andreas – published with permission.

You’ll see how you can sign up for a daily dose of whimsy from the lovely folk at Story People if you click on the link.

 


Work part of positive change

April 27, 2014

Fifteen thousand fewer people dependent on benefits.

That’s not just a number.

That’s 15,000 individuals whose lives have improved because they’ve moved from welfare to work.

It’s a better life for their families too.

Welfare reforms are working – so are more people.

Photo: Our reforms are helping thousands of New Zealanders move from welfare into work. See more: www.national.org.nz/Article.aspx?articleId=43648


It’s not that simple

April 27, 2014

Labour finance spokesman David Parker on the  lowering the value of the New Zealand dollar:

. . . But let’s say the New Zealand dollar was overvalued by 15 percent that means that our exporters at the moment are losing 9 billion dollars per annum. . . .

If only it was that simple!

But it isn’t.

Lowering the value of the dollar doesn’t just increase the value of export earnings it puts up the price of all imports and reduces the value of savings and income.

Among the imports which would be more expensive is fuel which would increase household expenses directly and indirectly.

If fuel costs more so does transport and therefore everything that is transported.

Farmers would get more for what they sell but they’d also pay more for big ticket items they buy like fertiliser and machinery.

Other imports include medical supplies, food and a lot of other essentials so a lower dollar would push up costs for households.

If imports cost more inflation would rise which would put pressure on interest rates too.

A lower dollar would make it more expensive to repay foreign debt, public and private.

It would make property cheaper for foreigners too which might encourage more overseas buyers, something the left wants to discourage.

A 15% fall in the value of the dollar might bring in $9 billion more per annum gross but it’s the net figure when increased costs are taken into account that matters.

That won’t be anywhere near $9 billion and it could even result in a greater loss than gain.


Sunday soapbox

April 27, 2014

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse.Photo: <3 Attitude is everything <3 Lynda Field Life Coach visit www.lyndafield.com


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