Word of the day

March 8, 2014

Piquant  – having a pleasantly sharp taste or appetizing flavour; agreeably stimulating, interesting, or attractive; sharp, pointed object; spec. a hedgehog spine.


Wayne Walford Nat candidate for Napier

March 8, 2014

National’s Napier electorate has selected Hawkes Bay Chamber of Commerce Chief Executive Wayne Walford as its candidate to replace retiring MP Chris Tremain.

“Wayne has a great understanding of communities across Napier and Wairoa. He has the full support of myself and the National Party to run a strong campaign for the seat this year,” says retiring MP Chris Tremain.

Mr Walford says he is proud to have been selected and will be working hard to keep Napier’s strong voice in John Key’s National Party.

“The Government has delivered real results for the Hawkes Bay, and strong local representation in John Key’s National Party has been critical to getting some major local projects over the line,” says Mr Walford.

“These include the expressway redevelopment and Napier-Wairoa Road upgrade to name just a few.

“I’ll be working hard to win the confidence of the electorate to keep that strong voice and continue delivering jobs and growth for Napier, Wairoa, and the Bay.”

Wayne Walford – Biographical Notes

Of Ngati Porou descent, Wayne Walford was raised in the Hawke’s Bay and lives in Napier with wife Joan.

As Chief Executive Officer of the Hawkes Bay Chamber of Commerce, Wayne brings a track record of advocacy and leadership, and a focus on jobs and growth.

He holds a Masters in Business Administration and a Post Graduate Diploma in Business Studies from the University of Waikato, and a Diploma in Business Studies from Massey University.

 This is the second National selection this weekend and again the members have chosen a strong candidate.


Rural round-up

March 8, 2014

Otago water plan appeals resolved:

The appeals of Federated Farmers and others on Otago Regional Council’s Plan Change 6A (Water Quality) have been constructively resolved for farming and the environment.

“Otago Regional Council’s Plan Change 6A is now a reality,” says Stephen Korteweg, Federated Farmers Otago provincial president.

“On paper, at least, it offers a roadmap for maintaining or improving water quality in Otago. Now the hard work of implementing the plan begins. . .

What’s good for the farmer also proves good for the environment – Jamie Gray:

In Canterbury, the cockies are only half joking when they say they’re into hydroponics.

For dairy farmers, once they have the land it’s just a matter of adding water, the right feed, nutrients and cows and the result is milk. Lots of it.

In some parts of the province, you only have to dig down a few centimetres before hitting gravel and soil can vary widely in depth and quality.

Dairying does have an impact on the environment and it is heavily reliant on irrigation. So it comes as no surprise that water usage and quality is a hot topic in the region and the nation in general. . .

New posting to boost MPI presence in the Middle East:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed the creation of a new position for an Agricultural Counsellor to be based in Dubai.

The announcement has been made as part of the Minister’s current visit to Saudi Arabia, Oman and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

“This new position is the latest step by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) to increase its presence in the Middle East. It recognises the growing importance of the New Zealand relationship with the region and will provide further support for New Zealand exporters,” says Mr Guy.

“Based in Dubai, the position will cover key markets in the Middle East and seek to advance our trade and economic relationships. The position will also contribute to New Zealand’s strategy to develop strong government and private sector relationships with the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). . .

Why wait till disaster strikes? – Katie Milne:

Ten years ago last month, the Manawatu suffered flooding in scenes eerily similar to what we saw in Britain and now Christchurch.  That 2004 flood event cost $300 million with Palmerston North coming within a hair’s breadth of disaster. 

In Britain, a former head of its Environment Agency dismissively said of Somerset’s flood management: “I’d like to see a limpet mine put on every pumping station.”  The UK’s Environment Agency acts like a huge regional council for England and Wales on flood and coastal management.  Its embattled head, Lord Smith, now faces headlines like this: “Environment Agency bosses spent £2.4million on PR… but refused £1.7million dredging of key Somerset rivers that could have stopped flooding.”

In October 2010, the late Horizons Regional Councillor, David Meads, told the Manawatu Standard that the Resource Management Act made it harder for his council to deliver its core business of flood protection:  “…that $6 million saved Palmerston North…But the work lower down, on the tributaries, was way behind. As we found out in 2004.”  Farmers felt shut out on consultation on flood and drainage schemes yet, “they were the people whose gumboots overflowed when heavy rain caused flooding on the plains.” In Christchurch, I guess we can add homeowners. . .

Husband and Wife to be tested in Kaikohe:

The Northern Regional Final of ANZ Young Farmer Contest will see husband and wife Rachel and Robert Cashmore of Papakura, battle it out in Kaikohe, Saturday 15 March.

The couple, along with six other competitors, will be vying for a place at the Grand Final and their share of $14,000 in prizes from ANZ, Lincoln University, Silver Fern Farms, AGMARDT, Ravensdown, Honda, Husqvarna and Vodafone.

The events begin with the practical day at the Kaikohe Showgrounds which will test competitors’ skills, strength and stamina. There will be a variety of hands-on, physical and theoretical challenges – all with an agricultural and farming focus.. .

Fieldays seeks agricultural innovators:

The highly regarded Fieldays Innovation Competition is back after yet another ground breaking year which saw previous entrants finding fame and fortune.

The most innovative competition in the agricultural industry is now open for 2014 and organisers are urging inventors to enter their rural innovations in the distinguished competition held annually at Fieldays, the Southern Hemisphere’s largest agribusiness expo.

The competition celebrates New Zealand ingenuity by showcasing the latest innovations, backyard inventions and commercial improvements, with thousands of Fieldays visitors eager to view the latest rural advancements. . .

Years of Dedication Sees Double Award Win for Goat Cheesemaker:

Rural Waikato cheesemaker Jeanne Van Kuyk is celebrating an incredible double win at the 2014 NZ Champions of Cheese Awards after claiming a highly sought-after supreme award and major category win.

Aroha Organic Goat Cheese cheesemaker, Jeanne, was presented with the Milk Test NZ Cheesemaker of the Year Award at a gala dinner and awards night held at The Langham, Auckland on Tuesday night (March 4).

While the certified organic, and GE free company is no stranger to award wins, this is the first time Aroha Organic Goat Cheese has taken out one of the coveted supreme titles. . .


How languages sound to foreigners

March 8, 2014

Ever wondered what your language sounds like to a foreigner.

19-year-old Finnish YouTube user Sara is here to unveil the mystery. Although she is speaking total gibberish, her spot-on accents give us a clue as to how you might sound to someone who doesn’t speak your language.


Celebrating all but one

March 8, 2014

It’s International Women’s Day and National is celebrating the depth and diversity of their women’s caucus.

Photo: National women - Strong, dynamic leaders.

Labour is trying to but have scored another SMOG – social media own goal.

They’re celebrating all but one of their women –  Dunedin South MP Clare Curran is missing.
Where's Clare?

Is this deliberate or accidental and does it have anything to do with the fact that Dunedin South still hasn’t confirmed its candidate selection?


He would say that

March 8, 2014

Labour MP Shane Jones says he backs his leader, David Cunliffe.

Well, he would say that wouldn’t he – but does he mean it?

 


Belief born out of experience

March 8, 2014

One of the 12 questions put to National Minister Steven Joyce was were you always right wing at heart?

To which he answered:

I don’t see myself as right wing. I’ve believed strongly in the ability of individuals to make decisions and make their own courses in terms of how they want to live their lives. I don’t see that as particularly ideological.

My parents owned a dairy when I was young and wanted to get ahead in life. What I believe is born out of my experience, I don’t think it’s particularly right wing. The labelling of particular politics is a bit unhelpful in many ways.

Joyce, like most National MPs has had plenty of experience of the risks and rewards of  the real world and it is that which has shaped his beliefs.

That is yet another contrast with Labour, very few of whose MPs have business experience and whose beliefs appear to be built on political theory rather than real-world practice.


Saturday soapbox

March 8, 2014

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse, amuse or bemuse.

Don't you agree?


March 8 in history

March 8, 2014

1126 Alfonso VII was proclaimed king of Castile and Leon, after the death of his mother Urraca.

1495 John of God, Portuguese-born friar and saint, was born (d. 1550).

1655 John Casor becomes the first legally-recognised slave in what became the United States.

1702 Anne Stuart, sister of Mary II, became Queen regnant of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

1722 The Safavid Empire of Iran was defeated by an army from Afghanistan at The Battle of Gulnabad, pushing Iran into anarchy.

1775 Thomas Paine’s “African Slavery in America,” the first article in the U.S. calling for the emancipation of slaves and the abolition of slavery was published.

1777 Regiments from Ansbach and Bayreuth, sent to support Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War, mutinied in the town of Ochsenfurt.

1782 Gnadenhütten massacre: Ninety-six Native Americans in Gnadenhutten, Ohio, who had converted to Christianity were killed by Pennsylvania militiamen in retaliation for raids carried out by other Indians.

1817 The New York Stock Exchange was founded.

1844 King Oscar I ascended to the throne of Sweden-Norway.

1856 Bramwell Booth, the 2nd General of The Salvation Army, was born  (d. 1929).

1859 Kenneth Grahame, English author, was born (d. 1932).

1911 International Women’s Day was launched in Copenhagen by Clara Zetkin, leader of the Women’s Office for the Social Democratic Party in Germany.

1917 The U.S. Senate votes to limit filibusters by adopting the cloture rule.

1921 Spanish Premier Eduardo Dato Iradier was assassinated.

1924 The Castle Gate mine disaster killed 172 coal miners near Castle Gate, Utah.

1929 Frank Borzage’s Street Angel, a silent picture with a recorded musical soundtrack, screened at Wellington’s Paramount Theatre – before this silent movies had been accompained by live music.

First 'talkie' draws huge crowds in Wellington

1936 Daytona Beach Road Course held their first oval stock car race.

1937 Juvénal Habyarimana, President of Rwanda, was born.

1942 The Dutch surrendered to Japanese forces on Java.

1943 Lynn Redgrave, English actress, was born  (d. 2010).

1945 Micky Dolenz, American musician (The Monkees), was born.

1946 Randy Meisner, American musician (The Eagles)

1947 Mike Allsup, American musician (Three Dog Night), was born.

1957 Egypt re-opened the Suez Canal after the Suez Crisis.

1963 The Ba’ath Party came to power in Syria in a Coup d’état by a clique of quasi-leftist Syrian Army officers calling themselves the National Council of the Revolutionary Command.

1966 – A bomb planted by young Irish protesters destroyed Nelson’s Pillar in Dublin.

1974 Charles de Gaulle Airport opened in Paris.

1978 The first-ever radio episode of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams, was transmitted on BBC Radio 4.

1979 – Philips demonstrated the Compact Disc publicly for the first time.

1980 The first festival of rock music kicked off in the Soviet Union.

1985 A failed assassination attempt on Sayyed Mohammad Hussein Fadlallah in Beirut killed at least 45 and injured 175 others.

2004  A new constitution was signed by Iraq’s Governing Council.

2010 – The stolen body of Tassos Papadopoulos, 5th President of Cyprus, was discovered in a cemetery near the capital.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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