Shane Reti for Whangarei

March 7, 2014

Dr Shane Reti has won the National Party selection for Whangarei.

He has a very impressive background:

He was head-hunted by the eminent Harvard Medical School, but Whangarei doctor Shane Reti says his feet remain firmly grounded in Northland and he’s returning home hoping to represent the district in Parliament.

After six years living in Boston, but returning every three months or so, Dr Reti is on his way home to seek the National Party nomination to replace Phil Heatley as MP in the 2014 general election.

Dr Reti said he was offered incentives by Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School to stay and carry on his important medical work, but the calling to come home for good was too strong. . .

He worked in general practice in Whangarei for 17 years, and was a member of the Northland District Health Board for seven years, before being awarded a Harkness Fellowship to Harvard, in 2007.

He has examined community health issues such as how to improve appointment rates at public hospitals, and once offered to fund a $70,000 survey on fluoride, out of his own pocket.

In 2004 he completed the first comprehensive study of Northland’s heath status which revealed a deteriorating state of health, with diabetes a major concern after spending the previous two years pounding the pavements and knocking on doors interviewing almost 300 Northlanders and analysing their information to produce the ground-breaking study.

He returns home every three months or so to treat patients at his Rust Ave practice. . .

“I know Whangarei and Northland as well as anybody and despite being offered a number of incentives to stay (at Harvard) I want to come back and try to make a difference for Whangarei in Parliament,” he said.

Dr Reti said he was to the right of centre in his political leanings, believing in strong fiscal responsibility. “But I also believe in a social safety net, so that makes me egalitarian. I also believe in reward for hard work, which makes me centre right,” he said.

 

 


Word of the day

March 7, 2014

Malicidity – a combination of malice and stupidity, treachery and boneheadedness.

Hat tip: Trans Tasman.


Friday’s answers

March 7, 2014

It was your turn to ask the questions.

If Rob, Andrei an/or  Alwyn stumped us all they can collect an electronic jar of raspberry jam by leaving the correct answers below.

Keeping Stock gets a grin and an if-only -I-knew.

Rob gets a bonus jar of jam for his second question.

Yesterday and today have been busy and I’ve only now had time to look at the answers. I’m disappointed by the thread-jack and the first two questions in response to it.

Robert should refer to Rob’s question @11:57.

I understand what  Paranormal was doing and why, but it could have done it with political examples rather than the ones chosen for the first two questions.

Questions 3-5 stumped everyone and get an electronic jar of jam for doing so and an exactly for the answer @ 8:50.

 


Rural round-up

March 7, 2014

Why agribusiness is different – Keith Woodford:

There is a common perception within Business Schools that agribusiness should operate by the same principles as other businesses. The reality is somewhat different. Agribusiness plays by its own complex set of biophysical rules, and beats to its own drum.

There are at least six defining reasons why agribusiness is different from most other types of business. It is these differences which make agribusiness so complex, so fascinating, and at times so frustrating. It is these same differences that can also cause so-called business experts to struggle when they apply their textbook skills to agribusiness.

The six defining characteristics are long investment cycles, long production cycles, production volatility, food safety issues, the politics of food security and environmental implications. The specific ways that these characteristics play out vary from situation to situation. . .

Education for Agribusiness – Keith Woodford:

Last week I wrote about how agribusiness was fundamentally different to other forms of business. I described the defining characteristics as long investment cycles, long production cycles, production volatility, food safety issues, the politics of food security, and environmental impacts. The one I missed was perishability.

All of the above have implications for agribusiness education. Without an understanding of biology, agribusiness managers will blunder.

Of course agribusiness managers also have to understand the principles of economics, marketing, accounting, finance, and law. And then there is the challenge of bringing all of these together within an overall bio-physical system. . .

Kiwi gene tool offers big boost – Abby Brown:

Kiwi technology developed to find desirable sheep traits and now being used on Atlantic salmon could boost agricultural profits by $300 million every year.

It has potential for use on other farm animals, pastures, pests, trees and diseases and could be used for audit and traceability purposes.

Genomic tools created by AgResearch to test a sheep’s genetic worth and predict its future productive merit and meat quality are now being transferred to Atlantic salmon in Iceland in a project that could see them used in other animals, plants and organisms.

The Infinium chip’s technology has enabled researchers to profile a diverse range of traits in a sheep’s DNA and for the first time across a variety of breeds. . .

Employers must recruit on skills – Marie Taylor:

Fencepost Jobs website staff have refused to post advertisements for dairy farmers who want to employ only Filipino staff.

Employing people had a large legal responsibility that went with it and human rights legislation made it illegal to discriminate in employment, which started with advertising roles, DairyNZ people team leader Jane Muir said.

All New Zealand employers, including farmers, had to recruit on skills, Muir said.

“This should also give you the best person for the role.”

A Fencepost spokeswoman said while the site was the largest in the country for dairy workers, containing up to 500 advertisements for work wanted or offered at one time, the advertisements were not policed. . .

Advanced weaning approach boosts beef return:

IF YOU haven’t weaned your beef calves by the end of this month you could be compromising calf and overall farm performance, the experience of a leading Hawkes Bay station shows.

Rissington Station’s advanced weaning approach, honed over the past five years, is to wean calves at 150 days old instead of the traditional March or April date.

A minimum liveweight threshold of 160kg is applied but in practice calves are averaging 230kg at 150 days. . .

 

Dry message goes out:

DairyNZ is issuing summer dry messages to farmers and advising farmers to look after young stock.

DairyNZ’s Craig McBeth drove from Hamilton to Wellington last weekend and got a pretty good idea of the situation, he says.

The drought is severe in Waikato and he was amazed at how dry it was around Otaki in Horowhenua, he says. He knows it is equally dry in parts of Northland’s west. . . .


Why business confidence matters

March 7, 2014

First the good news:

Finance Minister Bill English talked up NZ’s economic progress this week, telling Parliament Treasury’s Monthly Economic Indicators for February show the positive momentum in the economy in the September 2013 quarter continued into the December quarter. The number of people employed increased by 66,600 in 2013, unemployment fell to 6%, and total weekly gross earnings were 5.2% higher than a year earlier, reflecting the combined effect of wage and job growth. Labour force participation, the proportion of the adult population available for work, is close to a 28-year high. The rate of building consents is at the highest level since 2008 and has doubled since 2011. Consumer and business confidence are relatively high.

And why it matters:

English says the Govt is focused on a more productive and competitive economy, and that means working to rebalance the economy so more of it is exposed to world trade. “In the long term we need to see less Govt spending and less domestic consumption, and more focus on profitable export sectors that earn a living for NZ from the rest of the world. The importance of business confidence is it tends to drive investment decisions. So when business is confident about the future, it is more likely to borrow the money or raise it from other sources and invest in the plant and equipment and the opportunities for more higher-paying jobs. Without that confidence, we will not get the investment and the better-paying jobs.”

And for those who think the minimum wage is too low:

The ANZ Business Outlook survey shows 71% of firms are optimistic, the highest level since 1994. English says the Govt is focused on locking in gains from this positive outlook where it has a direct role in doing so. The increase in the adult minimum wage to $14.25 an hour, from $13.75 an hour, takes it to a level 19% higher than in 2008. The Govt has sought to balance the needs of workers and businesses to keep the minimum wage at around 50% of the average wage, and this relationship of the minimum wage at 50% of the average wage is the highest in the OECD. . .

Those who complain the minimum wage is still too low forget too things – imposing a minimum wage costs jobs and it’s a floor not a ceiling.

Apropos of which, does anyone know how many people receive the minimum wage, how many of those are full time, permanent employees and what ages they are?


ES requires consent for dairy farms

March 7, 2014

A plan change by Environment Southland means all new dairy farms will require resource consent:

Owners of all new dairy farms in Southland now have to apply for resource consent after a contentious plan change was approved by Environment Southland.

Plan Change 13 was notified nearly two years ago and trialled in the past year, with Environment Southland adopting it in a public-excluded council meeting yesterday.

Under the new rules, all new dairy farms need a resource consent before becoming operational.

Applicants require a conversion environmental plan, which includes a soil assessment, a nutrient management plan and a winter grazing plan.

This imposes additional fees on top of those already charged for water and discharge permits and could cost farmers about $1000 in total.

Environment Southland chairwoman Ali Timms said the rule would provide the council with a tool to meet the community’s concerns for water quality, while also meeting the council’s national obligations.

The new rules would help to ensure Southland’s water quality did not decline any further, she said. . .

ES is the first council to require consent for dairying.

Other councils could follow, though it would be sensible to wait and see whether the plan change works as it is intended to.

Few would argue with the intention to improve water quality but it will take some time to determine if this is the best way to achieve it.

 


Malicidity

March 7, 2014

Quote of the day:

. . . Labour couldn’t run a bath – and if they did, it would leak. But would the leak be deliberate or accidental? Who, after the last week, can say? There was a flurry of discussion over whether the leaks about David Cunliffe’s secret trust, and then the Clare Curran email snafu, were on purpose or by accident. Malice or stupidity? There is perhaps a third, blended category: Malicidity. A combination of malice and stupidity, treachery and boneheadedness. . . Trans Tasman

A majority of caucus saddled with a leader they didn’t prefer; fissions and factions within and between caucus and members . . .

It would be a reasonably safe bet that the leaks would be deliberate.


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