WTO delivers

The World Trade Organisation has delivered:

The World Trade Organisation (WTO) has agreed on its first-ever global deal aimed at boosting commerce. Analysts say it could add $1 trillion to the global economy.

The agreement – reached in Bali after marathon negotiations between trade ministers from 159 nations – simplifies trade procedures and also makes it easier for the poorest countries to sell their goods by reducing export barriers and allowing such nations more scope to use subsidies to safeguard food supplies.

It is seen as an important step for the WTO, which has struggled to make new trade agreements since being founded in 1995, the BBC’s economics correspondent reports.

“For the first time in our history, the WTO has truly delivered,” says WTO chief Roberto Azevedo. “This time the entire membership came together. We have put the ‘world’ back in World Trade Organisation.”. . .

The core of the deal is trade facilitation:

. . . This is about reducing the costs and delays involved in international trade. It is often described as “cutting red tape”.

Some analysts suggest the benefits could be large. An influential Washington think tank has put the potential gains to the world economy at close to $1tn and 20m million jobs.

It also estimates the cost of administrative barrier as double the cost of tariffs.

The rich countries have agreed to help the poorer WTO members with implementing this agreement.

Another important aspect of the Bali package is about enabling poor countries to sell their goods more easily. This part is about tariffs, and also quota limits on imports.

Rich countries and the more advanced developing countries have agreed to cut tariffs on products from the poorest nations.

The head of New Zealand’s International Business Forum says a new global trade deal agreed by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) will mean cheaper and faster exports.

International Business Forum executive director Stephen Jacobi says exporters’ goods will be fast-tracked through international customs as the facilitation part of the deal cuts down on red tape for traders.

“The main benefit of this agreement is that it will become easier and faster and cheaper to move goods around supply chains, to export our goods around the world, and indeed to import our goods from other countries.”

Business New Zealand chief executive Phil O’Reilly says the WTO deal will boost the confidence of trade ministers meeting in Singapore to try to reach agreement on the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal.

The deal marks the WTO’s first global trade agreement since it was created in 1995 and follows years of failed attempts to secure the required unanimous approval from all its members. . . .

British Prime Minister David Cameron says the deal could be worth more than £1 billion a year to British businesses and £70 billion globally.

“. . . By slashing barriers to trade, this deal will also provide a lifeline to the world’s poorest people. Helping developing countries to grow is not only the right thing to do, but it also increases potential markets for us all. So this really is win-win and the World Trade Organisation is to be commended for this historic deal.”

Trade restrictions mean people get less for what they produce and pay more for what they consume and this hurts poorer people and poorer countries hardest.

Freer trade is fairer trade and poorer people and countries have the most to gain from it.

One Response to WTO delivers

  1. adamsmith1922 says:

    Confirmation that this is a good thing, which it is, will be when Jane Kelsey decries the deal.

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