Word of the day

December 1, 2013

Scopperloit – rude or rough play; horseplay; roughhousing.


How far they have fallen

December 1, 2013

Tweet of the day:


Rural round-up

December 1, 2013

Best little river in New Zealand – Rebecca Fox:

Gradual improvements in water quality in East Otago’s Shag River over nearly a decade have earned it the grand prize in the inaugural 2013 New Zealand River Awards.

”The Shag is the best little river in New Zealand,” Otago Regional Council chairman Stephen Woodhead, said when he accepted the award at a ceremony in Wellington last night.

He said the award was for the river’s community and recognition of the work landowners had done to improve practices on land through which the river flowed. . .

Good things take time:

Federated Farmers is thrilled by the recognition Otago farmers received at the first New Zealand River Awards last night, with two rivers as finalists and the Shag River taking the prize for most improved river in New Zealand. 

“The Shag River has come a long way from 10 years ago, and it is a credit to those farmers who care for and value their river,” says Ian Mackenzie, Federated Farmers water spokesperson.

“Change is hard for everyone, but once you take the time to get everyone on board you can really make a difference. Changing the result of 30 years of degradation is not a quick fix, there is no instant gratification, so that is why 10 years on from the water management plan’s implementation you are seeing some positive results. . .

Beetle’s prickly appetite could have wider impact– Tony Benny:

Scientists hope a thistle-munching beetle already reducing prickly weed infestations in the south will also lay waste to hard-to-control Californian thistles on North Canterbury hill country farms.

Landcare released European-sourced green thistle beetles – also known as cassida or tortoise beetles – on about 50 farms, mostly in lowland Southland, five years ago.

AgResearch scientists want to find out more about the beetle and see if it can go to work in the hill country of North Canterbury and the North Island.

“We’re starting to see the effects of the beetle, and Southland farmers are thinking that it’s having quite a good effect on the thistle populations there,” said AgResearch scientist Michael Cripps. “Basically, they’re seeing observational evidence of a decline in the thistle population.” . . .

Pastoral farmers asked to think pig, poultry-style – Tim Fulton:

CANTERBURY farmers affected by Chilean Needle Grass (CNG) have been encouraged by local support for their position but the regional council warns the grass can still take root any time and place.

ECan’s latest biosecurity newsletter suggests pastoral farmers take similar precautions to pig and poultry farmers, by controlling movement of people, vehicles and machinery on and off their property

Sheep farmer Owen Gould from Parnassus in the Hurunui district has clarified the extent of CNG on his place, hoping to make other farmers aware of the plant and steps to contain it. . .

Govt help unlikely – Alan Williams:

Three of New Zealand’s biggest meat companies took a restructuring proposal to the Government but were told they would need more substantial industry and farmer support before it could help with legislation.

The reaction has negative implications for any plan involving a merger between only two players, the Silver Fern Farms and Alliance Group co-operatives.

In its campaigning to get candidates elected to the boards of the two co-ops, the Meat Industry Excellence (MIE) group has suggested the Government would legislate to provide protection for their 52-54% market share in the early stages of a merged entity. . .

David makes old Goliath steam:

When David Walker first saw the 1901 traction engine at a Marlborough winery it was a hulk.

He described its condition as “rust value only” when he took delivery on April 16 this year.

However, the committed restorer had the rare 10 horsepower steam driven engine up and running, albeit minus its pin-striping, in time for the weekend’s Nelson A&P Show.

“It hadn’t been steamed up in 62 years,” said Mr Walker of his latest prize. To get it operational he had to replace, rebuild or repair nearly every moving part. . .

NZB National Yearling Sales Series Catalogues Online Today:

The catalogues for New Zealand Bloodstock’s 88th National Yearling Sales Series are now available online.

A total of 1371 yearlings have been catalogued across the three sales sessions of Karaka’s week-long auction extravaganza, starting on Monday 27 January 2014.
Premier Cover

The PREMIER SALE catalogue features a world-class line-up of 469 Lots – 28 more than in January 2013 – set to be offered over two days on Monday 27 & Tuesday 28 January, commencing at 11am each day. . .


Cows are mothers too

December 1, 2013

Tweet of the day:


Suitably Ambiguous

December 1, 2013

ambiguous

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today she decided to be suitably ambiguous so you can think what you like about her.

Amount of time scheduled for the opinions of others ZERO.

From Story People by Brian Andreas

The email fairies there will send you a daily dose of whimsy like this if you sign up by clicking on the link.


6/10

December 1, 2013

6/10 in NBR’s Biz Quiz.


Pengxin posts operating loss on NZ farms

December 1, 2013

Pengxin Group which bought the Crafar farms last year reported an operating loss in their first year.

Pengxin New Zealand Farm Management reported an operating loss of $1 million in the year ended June 30 on revenue of $10.5 million, according to its first annual report to the Overseas Investment Office. The farming operation, managed by state-owned enterprise Landcorp, was hit by the drought within six weeks of Pengxin purchasing the land, sapping milk production and driving up costs to buy additional feed.

“The critical focus for Pengxin and Landcorp was to manage the welfare of all animals on the property, and protect the farming position for the subsequent season,” the report said. . .

Will the xenophobes who complain about profits from foreign-owned businesses go overseas be just as concerned that the loss has been sustained by foreigners?


From vicious circle to virtuous cycle

December 1, 2013

No-one who can work should be better off on welfare than work.

Rodney Hide shows how to achieve that:

. . . We can’t legislate high wages or jobs. If we could, we would be rich already.

The only answer is more productivity. The key here is more investment and more people in work. The key to more investment is lower tax. The key to lower tax is less welfare spending. The key to more people in work is less welfare. Oh hang on, did I just propose the solution?

The politics and propaganda of welfarism is a vicious circle. The solution is a virtuous circle for everyone bar politicians and government pushers. That’s the shame of it, because they are the ones who run and profit from it all.

He is right about the need for more productivity.

He is wrong that all politicians want continued dependency.

National definitely doesn’t and that’s why there’s such a concerted effort to help people who could work into jobs.

It’s better for them, it’s better for the economy, it’s better for society.


Sunday soapbox

December 1, 2013

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse or amuse – and to support #gigatownoamaru .

Surely, in the light of history, it is more important to hope rather than to fear, to try than not to try. For the one thing we know beyond all doubt: Nothing has ever been achieved by the person who says ‘it can’t be done.'” –Eleanor Roosevelt


December 1 in history

December 1, 2013

800 – Charlemagne judged the accusations against Pope Leo III.

1420 – Henry V of England entered Paris.

1640 – End of the Iberian Union: Portugal acclaimed as King, João IV of Portugal, thus ending a 60 year period of personal union of the crowns of Portugal and Spain and the end of the rule of the House of Habsburg (also called the Philippine Dynasty).

1761 Marie Tussaud, French creator of wax sculptures (Madame Tussauds), was born (d. 1850).

1768 – The slave ship Fredensborg sank off Tromøy in Norway.

1821 – The first constitution of Costa Rica was issued.

1822 – Pedro I was crowned Emperor of Brazil.

1824 – U.S. presidential election, 1824: Since no candidate had received a majority of the total electoral college votes in the election, the United States House of Representatives was given the task of deciding the winner in accordance with the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

1826 – French philhellene Charles Nicolas Fabvier forced his way through the Turkish cordon and ascended the Acropolis of Athens, which had been under siege.

1834 – Slavery was abolished in the Cape Colony in accordance with the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.

1864 – In his State of the Union Address President Abraham Lincoln reaffirmed the necessity of ending slavery as ordered ten weeks earlier in the Emancipation Proclamation.

1913 – The Buenos Aires Subway started operating, the first underground railway system in the southern hemisphere and in Latin America.

1913 – The Ford Motor Company introduced the first moving assembly line.

1913 – Crete, was annexed by Greece.

1918 – Transylvania united with Romania.

1918 – Iceland became a sovereign state, yet remained a part of the Danish kingdom.

1918 – The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later known as the Kingdom of Yugoslavia) was proclaimed.

1919 – Lady Astor became the first female Member of Parliament to take her seat in the House of Commons (she had been elected to that position on November 28).

1925 – World War I aftermath: The final Locarno Treaty was signed in London, establishing post-war territorial settlements.

1932  – Matt Monro, English singer, was born.

1933 – Pilot E.F. (‘Teddy’) Harvie and his passenger, Miss Trevor Hunter, set a record for the longest flight within New Zealand in a single day. They flew approximately 1880 km between North Cape and Invercargill in 16 hours 10 minutes.

1934 – Politburo member Sergei Kirov was shot dead by Leonid Nikolayev at the Communist Party headquarters in Leningrad.

1935 Woody Allen, American film director, actor, and comedian, was born.

1939 Lee Trevino, American golfer, was born.

1940  Richard Pryor, American actor, comedian, was born.

1941 – Fiorello La Guardia, Mayor of New York City and Director of the Office of Civilian Defense, signed Administrative Order 9, creating the Civil Air Patrol.

1945 Bette Midler, American actress and singer, was born.

1946  Gilbert O’Sullivan, Irish singer, was born.

1952 – The New York Daily News reported the news of Christine Jorgenson, the first notable case of sexual reassignment surgery.

1955 – American Civil Rights Movement: In Montgomery, Alabama, seamstress Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat to a white man and is arrested for violating the city’s racial segregation laws.

1958 – The Central African Republic became independent from France.

1958 – The Our Lady of the Angels School Fire in Chicago killed 92 children and three nuns.

1959 – Cold War: Opening date for signature of the Antarctic Treaty, which set aside Antarctica as a scientific preserve and bans military activity on the continent.

1960 – Paul McCartney and Pete Best were arrested then deported from Hamburg, Germany, after accusations of attempted arson.

1961 – The independent Republic of West Papua was proclaimed in modern-day Western New Guinea.

1965 – The Border Security Force was formed in India as a special force to guard the borders.

1969 – Vietnam War: The first draft lottery in the United States was held since World War II.

1971 – Cambodian Civil War: Khmer Rouge rebels intensified assaults on Cambodian government positions, forcing their retreat from Kompong Thmar and nearby Ba Ray.

1971 – The Indian Army recaptured part of Kashmir occupied forcibly by Pakistan.

1973 – Papua New Guinea gained self government from Australia.

1974 – TWA Flight 514, a Boeing 727, crashed northwest of Dulles International Airport killing all 92 people on-board.

1974 – Northwest Orient Airlines Flight 6231, crashed northwest of John F. Kennedy International Airport.

1981 – A Yugoslavian Inex Adria Aviopromet DC-9 crashed in Corsica killing all 180 people on-board.

1981 – The AIDS virus was officially recognized.

1982 – At the University of Utah, Barney Clark became the first person to receive a permanent artificial heart.

1988 – Benazir Bhutto was appointed Prime Minister of Pakistan.

1989 – 1989 Philippine coup attempt: The right-wing military rebel Reform the Armed Forces Movement attempted to oust Philippine President Corazon Aquino in a failed bloody coup d’état.

1989 – Cold War: East Germany’s parliament abolished the constitutional provision granting the communist party the leading role in the state.

1990 – Channel Tunnel sections started from the United Kingdom and France meet 40 metres beneath the seabed.

1991 – Cold War: Ukrainian voters overwhelmingly approve a referendum for independence from the Soviet Union.

2001 – Captain Bill Compton brought Trans World Airlines Flight 220, an MD-83, into St. Louis International Airport bringing to an end 76 years of TWA operations following TWA’s purchase by American Airlines.

2001  Aiko, Princess Toshi of Japan, was born.

2009 – The Treaty of Lisbon, which amended the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty establishing the European Community, which together comprise the constitutional basis of European Union, came into effect.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


%d bloggers like this: