Is this a resignation offence?

03/11/2013

Ian Sinclair’s interview with Bevan Chuang on Sunday canvassed whether or not Auckland Mayor Len Brown wrote a reference for her for a council job after their liaison began:

IAN: And what about your application for the job, um, at the art gallery? Were you in a sexual relationship with him when you applied for that job and he wrote the reference?

BEVAN: He’s one of five referees that I have put on to the list.

IAN: At the time, though, Bevan, at the time when he wrote the reference, was he in a relationship with you? A romantic one, I mean?

BEVAN: Yes.

IAN: He was? Yeah, and at the time when it went forward to the shortlist, was he still there?

BEVAN: Yes.

IAN: But you did use your relationship with him — and it was a romantic relationship — to help gain, get backing for a job, did you not?

BEVAN: Um, he was a referee for the art gallery job, and probably you can say that. I mean, I have got— I’ve got the job, and, of course, the referees are important. Um, and, yeah, that could be the advantage, but I obviously have lost more now than I gained.

A mayor who acts as a referee for someone applying for a council position is at risk of compromising himself at the best of times.

Doing it for a lover is stupid, does it also contravene the council code of conduct?

Brown previously said he wrote the reference in the very early stages of us knowing each other.

If she is telling the truth the word knowing can be understood to be in the Biblical sense.

Is that sufficient offence to require his resignation?

Thankfully #gigatownoamaru is a long way from this tawdry affair.


Word of the day

03/11/2013

Insinuendo – a mixture of insinuation and innuendo.

A word not often needed in #gigatownoamaru


Rural round-up

03/11/2013

Reputation is everything says Synlait Milk – Tim Cronshaw:

Synlait Milk says it is doing all it can to prevent a food scare ever happening like Fonterra’s close shave.

The listed Canterbury milk products processor and exporter, backed by China’s Bright Dairy & Food, has managed to avoid incidents such as Fonterra’s botulism scare in whey protein concentrate, which proved to be a false alarm, and other traces of foreign material found in the milk processing industry.

Manufacturing general manager Neil Betteridge said a company’s reputation was everything in the food industry and there was no room for error in milk processing. . . .

Massey looks at cow barn potential:

MASSEY UNIVERSITY is testing a barn farm system with potential for improved productivity and better water quality on dairy farms.

Professor Mike Hedley, who leads the research at Massey, discussed the work recently with local farmers at the newly-built free stall barn.

The common practice of standing cows off pasture to reduce winter treading damage to pastures during wet soil conditions can also reduce losses of nutrients in surface runoff and drainage, he says. Loss of nitrogen to water is reduced if paddock urine patch load can be transferred to the standoff facility, such as a freestall barn, at critical times of the year. . . .

Getting people to drink more milk:

FLUID MILK CONSUMPTION is declining throughout the world while cheese and yoghurt consumption is up, the World Dairy Summit in Yokohama heard.

International Dairy Federation Japan chapter president Kenichi Unno says since 1960’s in traditionally milk-drinking countries in Europe, North America and Oceania, and since 1990’s in Japan, fluid milk consumption has been declining. Unno says cheese and yogurt consumption is increasing so milk and dairy products as a whole are still increasingly consumed. . .

Minister to meet formula firms over botulism scare:

Foreign Affairs minister Murray McCully plans to meet with small manufacturers of infant formula who feel they have been given little support to help them recover from Fonterra’s botulism scare.

The threat of botulism in whey protein sparked product recalls around the world but turned out to be a false alarm.

The New Zealand Infant Formula Exporters Association says even though many of its members do not use Fonterra whey protein, their connection to New Zealand meant their products were taken off the shelves in their biggest market, China. . .

MyFarm share trading kicks off – Greg Ninness:

Farm syndication and management company MyFarm launched its new farm share trading facility MyFarm Trading (www.mfx.co.nz) on the Unlisted share trading platform on Friday, which will allow small investors to invest in the dairy sector.

The new facility will allow people to buy and sell shares in what are being called Collective Investment Vehicles (CIVs), companies that invest directly in specified dairy farms.

The new facility will open up farm investment to a much broader range of people by reducing te amount of money they they need to be able to buy into a farm. . .

Enough is enough for Coast farmers – Tim Cronshaw:

As Canterbury is being barraged by strong northwest winds across the Southern Alps farmers are dealing with heavy rain on the West Coast and the worst flooding around paddocks near Lake Brunner is over the fenceposts.

Flooding crept over the road earlier this week at Aratika farmland beside the Arnold River and farmers hope the rain will keep at bay long enough so they can avoid a repeat of the wet 1998 season.

Since the big September windstorm in Canterbury, dairy farmers around Rotomanu and Inchbonnie have received one metre of rain. . .

Dairy women nominations close soon:

WOMEN WORKING in the dairy industry are being urged to get their nominations in for the 2014 Dairy Woman of the Year award, which closes for entry on November 15, 2013.

Sponsored by Fonterra, the prestigious award includes the chance to attend the year-long Women in Leadership programme valued at $25,000 and delivered by Global Women.

Dairy Women’s Network executive chair Michelle Wilson says the Dairy Woman of the Year award celebrates and advances women who are making a real difference in the dairy industry, in their dairying businesses and in their communities. . .


Tweet of the day

03/11/2013

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396815532273315840

No need to monitor #gigatownoamaru

P.S. You might have noticed I’ve just learned how to insert tweets.

 


What does the Farmer Say?

03/11/2013

This is a parody of What Does The Fox Say (if you haven’t seen that, Google will help).

#gigatownoamaru knows what the farmers say and appreciates what they do.


Angels of Mercy

03/11/2013

Open large picture

Story People by Brian Andreas.

You can sign up for a daily dose of whimsy like this by clicking on the link.

#gigatownoamaru definitely isn’t missing life.


NZ-China food safety agreement signed

03/11/2013

Food Safety Minister Nikki Kaye welcomed a food safety agreement signed today between New Zealand and China to strengthen cooperation in food safety and food quality.

The Food Safety Cooperation Arrangement between the Ministry for Primary Industries(MPI) and the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) was signed today in Wellington by the Chinese Vice Minister, Liu Peizhi and MPI Deputy Director General Carol Barnao.

“This is an important agreement that will be beneficial to both countries,” Ms Kaye says. “It will encourage cooperation and the sharing of knowledge in the fields of food safety, risk management, food standards and regulations.

“The agreement shows commitment and a willingness between New Zealand and China to work together on food safety programmes.

“It will allow MPI and the CFDA to work together to enhance food safety, continually improve our regulatory regimes and enhance the bilateral relationship.”

The agreement will see a Joint Food Safety Commission (JFSC) established to enhance food safety regulatory cooperation.

“The JFSC will allow MPI and the CFDA to meet on an annual basis to help build a better understanding of how our respective food safety systems work. We can identify areas of shared interest and potential new areas of cooperation,” Ms Kaye says.  

“The agreement also allows us to formalise our joint interests and is an important step in the evolution of China and New Zealand cooperation in food safety. 

“It will further build on the strong relationship that our two countries share, particularly in the agricultural and food sectors.”

This should be good for exporters and consumers.

Food safety is very important in #gigatownoamaru.


KiwiTweets

03/11/2013

Labour appears to think that putting Kiwi in front of something will make it a success.

Tweeters have grasped that idea and come up with more suggestions:

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396482168513249280

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396481944969420801

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396481376234389504

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396480986550001664

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396469006070059008

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396467208999559168

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396463314223370240

https://twitter.com/reedfleming/status/396567999571701760

And from Facebook:

What’s next? Kiwimart to deal to the evil supermarkets or Kiwigas to deal to evil fuel companies? Or kiwi corner store, because frankly the left reckon government should run everything #leavekiwisalone

#gigatownoamaru = KiwiSuccess.

Update – just found another couple:

https://twitter.com/JordanMcCluskey/status/396580027128479744

https://twitter.com/Inventory2/status/396718574489706496


Labour’s left lurch shows hasn’t learned

03/11/2013

Labour’s leftward lurch continues:

The Labour Party seems determined to continue ignoring all the evidence that New Zealand is on the right economic track, by promoting a radical shift into a state-controlled economy reminiscent of the 1970s, Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce says.

After another month when business confidence, employment intentions, consumer confidence, and net immigration continue to rise, Labour’s leadership are keeping their heads in the sand and suggesting what the country needs is a radical step back to the past with less opportunity, fewer jobs for New Zealanders, and more state control.

“They haven’t learnt. It was a Labour Government that drove New Zealand into a recession before the GFC, while it is the National Government that is lifting New Zealand out ahead of most of the developed world,” Mr Joyce says.

“And yet Labour’s leaders want to drag New Zealand not just back to 2008 but all the way to the 1970s.

“According to Labour, the Government should take political control of electricity, house building and now insurance. They want to remove the independence of the Reserve Bank, and they want to go back to a rigid national pay system, where everyone gets the same no matter who they work for or how hard they work; and they want to increase taxes on productive businesses that grow jobs.

“With the IMF saying that New Zealand is on track to be one of the strongest developed economies in the next few years; with businesses growing and adding jobs, and with low cost of living increases and low interest rates; New Zealanders are entitled to ask which planet are these people on?

“With the Government’s careful, conservative, and sensible economic policies starting to pay off for New Zealand, this is no time for Mr Cunliffe and Mr Parker to start trying their pet socialist theories out on the finely-tuned and increasingly strong New Zealand economy.”

The Minister with most experience in Christchurch, Gerry Brownlee says Labour’s insurance company would ratchet up the risk for everyone:

Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister and Minister Responsible for the Earthquake Commission Gerry Brownlee says Labour’s policy of establishing a state-owned insurer is no different than its other half-formed ideas – it’s emotive, shows a hopeless grasp of economic realities, and raises questions Labour won’t be able to credibly answer.

“Labour might hate private insurance companies, but the reality is they’re paying for $20 billion of the Canterbury rebuild – twice New Zealand’s annual corporate tax take,” Mr Brownlee says.

“The fact of the matter is you can only undercut insurance competitors if you’re prepared to take greater risk.

“Two insurance companies were doing that when the Christchurch earthquakes struck – both of them New Zealand owned – and they both collapsed.

“The reason insurance businesses tend to be internationally owned and operated, by big companies, is because they’re able to hedge their risk across a range of markets.

“Labour’s insurer would be completely exposed to the New Zealand market, which every citizen knows is at major risk of incurring heavy losses from natural disasters.

“So what Labour is saying is it’s prepared to increase the financial risk to every New Zealand taxpayer by entering a market in which it has no expertise and cannot offer any competitive advantage without ratcheting that risk up even higher.

“Insurance only works because big capital calls are available to back it, which is why insurers work very hard to price that risk accordingly, and smart governments limit their exposure on behalf of taxpayers where possible.

“With $600 billion of insured assets, New Zealand has a competitive insurance market for its size, with a more comprehensive range of cover than in many other jurisdictions.

“Ironically, given Labour’s apparent concern at foreign owned insurers’ profit levels, the chance of adverse selection occurring and simply increasing those profits further is very real.

“Again, insurance is priced to reflect risk, and the only way a state insurer could offer lower premiums is by managing risk unsustainably and becoming a magnet for bad risk.

“And the only way that ends is badly.”

Mr Brownlee says it’s simplistic and unfair of Labour to use the example of the Canterbury earthquakes as a reason to launch this policy – but then simplicity and negativity has been the hallmark of Labour’s response to the earthquakes.

“These events were like no others, and they were massive. Canterbury is the fourth largest natural disaster insurance event in history.

“But by working together, the Government, local government and the private sector are spending $40 billion putting the region back on its feet and creating a modern city all Cantabrians, and New Zealanders, can be justly proud of.”

And Minister Chris Finlayson gives a history lesson:

New Zealand was in recession long before the rest of the world because of mistakes the Labour-led government made.

Policy its announced so far show it hasn’t learned from those mistakes and is planning to make more.

#gigatownoamaru isn’t making any mistakes.


Sunday soapbox

03/11/2013

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse or amuse – or to add points for #gigatownoamaru.

>


November 3 in history

03/11/2013

644   Umar ibn al-Khattab, the second Muslim caliph, was martyred by a Persian slave in Medina.

1468  Liège was sacked by Charles I of Burgundy’s troops.

1783  John Austin, a highwayman, was the last person to be publicly hanged at London’s Tyburn gallows.

1783   The American Continental Army was disbanded.

1793   French playwright, journalist and feminist Olympe de Gouges was guillotined.

1801  Karl Baedeker, German author and publisher, was born (d 1859).

1812   Napoleon’s armies were defeated at Vyazma.

1817   The Bank of Montreal, Canada’s oldest chartered bank, opened.

1838  The Times of India, the world’s largest circulated English language daily broadsheet newspaper was founded as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce.

1848   A greatly revised Dutch constitution, drafted by Johan Rudolf Thorbecke, severely limiting the powers of the Dutch monarchy, and strengthening the powers of parliament and ministers, was proclaimed.

1867   Garibaldi and his followers were defeated in the Battle of Mentana and failed to end the Pope’s Temporal power in Rome.

1883    “Black Bart the poet” got away with his last stagecoach robbery, but left an incriminating clue that eventually led to his capture.

1886 Henry Reynolds launched his Anchor butter from a dairy factory at Pukekura, Waikato.

Birth of iconic Anchor butter brand

1886 – Manawatū rail link opened.

Manawatū rail link opened

1887   Coimbra Academic Association, the oldest students’ union in Portugal, was founded.

1903   Panama separated from Colombia.

1911  Chevrolet officially entered the automobile market in competition with the Ford Model T.

1913   The United States introduced an income tax.

1918   Austria-Hungary entered into an armistice with the Allies, and the Habsburg-ruled empire dissolves.

1918  Poland declared its independence from Russia.

1930  Getúlio Dornelles Vargas became Head of the Provisional Government in Brazil after a bloodless coup.

1935   George II of Greece regained his throne through a popular plebiscite.

1942   Second Battle of El Alamein ended – German forces under Erwin Rommel were forced to retreat during the night.

1942  World War II: The Koli Point action began during the Guadalcanal Campaign.

1943   World War II: 500 aircraft of the U.S. 8th Air Force devastated Wilhelmshafen harbor in Germany.

1944  World War II: Two supreme commanders of the Slovak National Uprising, Generals Ján Golian and Rudolf Viest were captured, tortured and later executed by German forces.

1948  Lulu, British actress and singer, was born.

1952 Roseanne Barr, American actress and comedian, was boprn.

1954  Adam Ant, English singer, was born.

1957  The Soviet Union launched Sputnik 2 with the first animal to enter orbit, a dog named Laika.

1964   Washington D.C. residents were able to vote in a presidential election for the first time.

1967   Vietnam War: The Battle of Dak To began.

1969  Vietnam War: U.S. President Richard M. Nixon addressed the nation on television and radio, asking the “silent majority” to join him in solidarity on the Vietnam War effort and to support his policies.

1973   NASA launched the Mariner 10 toward Mercury.

1974 – ‘Summer time’ reintroduced on trial basis.

'Summer time' reintroduced on trial basis

1978   Dominica gained independence from the United Kingdom.

1979   Greensboro massacre: Five members of the Communist Workers Party were shot dead and seven were wounded by a group of Klansmen and neo-Nazis during a “Death to the Klan” rally in Greensboro, North Carolina.

1982   The Salang tunnel fire in Afghanistan killed up to 2,000 people.

1986   Iran-Contra Affair: The Lebanese magazine Ash-Shiraa reported that the United States had been secretly selling weapons to Iran in order to secure the release of seven American hostages held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon.

1986   The Federated States of Micronesia gained independence from the United States.

1988    Tamil mercenaries tried to overthrow the Maldivian government.

1996   Death of Abdullah Çatlı, leader of the Turkish ultra-nationalist organisation Grey Wolves in the Susurluk car-crash.

2007  Pervez Musharraf declared emergency rule across Pakistan, suspending the Constitution, imposing a State of Emergency, and firing the chief justice of the Supreme Court.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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