Word of the day

October 15, 2013

Welter – wriggle; roll, writhe, tumble about; move in a turbulent fashion; to rise and fall or toss about in or with waves; surge, heave, or toss; to lie drenched in a liquid, especially blood; to become deeply sunk, soaked, or involved; to be in a turmoil; a rolling motion, as of the sea; a large number of items in no order; a confused mass.


Rural round-up

October 15, 2013

NZM’s innovation an award winner – Sally Rae:

Talk to New Zealand Merino Co chief executive John Brakenridge and there’s one word that keeps cropping up in conversation – innovation.

And it is that innovation that has seen both the company and Mr Brakenridge recognised at the New Zealand International Business Awards.

NZM won the AUT Business School award for most innovative business model in international business, while Mr Brakenridge was named KPMG leader for outstanding contribution to international business. . .

Learning from NZ farmers – Sally Rae:

Uruguayan farmers Francisco Arrosa and Jimena Popelka are looking forward to learning first-hand what their New Zealand counterparts do in a country they describe as a ”mecca of farming”.

Mr Arrosa and Ms Popelka are in New Zealand for this week’s Rotorua-based PGG Wrightson World Angus Forum.

The international four-yearly forum, which was last hosted in New Zealand more than 30 years ago, is also celebrating the 150th anniversary of the introduction of the breed to New Zealand. . . .

Dog club, district documented – Sally Rae:

A new book marking 100 years of the Waimate Sheep Dog Trial Club is ”more than just a story about a club”.

A Noble Pursuit, by Waimate author and historian John Foley, in collaboration with Judith Hayward, of Timaru, not only tells the story of the club since its establishment in 1912 but also that of the Waimate district.

In launching the book in Waimate last week, Federated Farmers vice-president William Rolleston said it was a reminder of ”enormous” changes in technology. . .

Biggest geranium, fuschia nursery in country – Yvonne O’Hara:

arry Hayes grows colour.

He owns Hayes Wholesale Nurseries and is one of the biggest wholesale growers and suppliers of petunias, Pac geraniums, fuchsias and Pac perlagoniums in New Zealand, and sells to local garden centres as well as national chains throughout the country.

The Makarewa-based nurseryman first became interested in the business when he worked for his parents who owned a garden centre. . .


Farm On

October 15, 2013


Rural women’s empowerment crucial for end of hunger, poverty

October 15, 2013

Empowering rural women is crucial for ending hunger and poverty.

This is the message from United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on the International Day of Rural Women which is celebrated on October 15th each year.

Rural women produce much of the world’s food, care for the environment and help reduce the risk of disaster in their communities. Yet they continue to face disadvantages and discrimination that prevent them from realizing their potential. For too many rural women, their daily reality is one in which they do not own the land they farm, are denied the financial services that could lift them out of poverty, and live without the guarantee of basic nutrition, health services and amenities such as clean water and sanitation. Unpaid care work imposes a heavy burden and prevents their access to decent wage employment.

Empowering rural women is crucial for ending hunger and poverty. By denying women rights and opportunities, we deny their children and societies a better future. This is why the United Nations recently launched a programme to empower rural women and enhance food security. The joint programme of the three Rome-based food and agricultural organizations and UN Women will work with rural women to remove the barriers they face, and to boost their skills as producers, leaders and entrepreneurs

When food and nutrition security are improved, rural women have more opportunities to find decent work and provide for the education and health of their children. With equal access to land, credit and productive resources, rural women can increase their productivity and sell their goods. As equal members of society, rural women can raise their voices as decision-makers and propel sustainable development.

The world has increasingly recognized the vital role that women play in building peace, justice and democracy. As we approach the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals, it is time to invest more in rural women, protect their rights, and improve their status. On this International Day, I call on all partners to support rural women, listen to their voices and ideas, and ensure that policies respond to their needs and demands. Let us do everything we can to enable them to reach their potential for the benefit of all.

The day day recognises the contribution of women in enhancing agricultural and rural development, improving food security and eradicating poverty.

In line with this, seven Rural Women NZ members have just returned from an enriching and rewarding experience connecting with village women near the Indian city of Chennai.

The group was attending the triennial world conference of the Associated Countrywomen of the World (ACWW), an organisation with a worldwide membership of over a million that has had consultative status at the United Nations since 1949.

But it was meeting the rural women of India that had most impact, Rural Women NZ national president, Liz Evans, said.

“The women, many of whom worked in the rice paddies, were so hospitable and so keen to tell us about their everyday lives, their aspirations and family ambitions. None of them had many financial resources, but, through project based aid organisations like ACWW, they were able to demonstrate their successes – especially around establishing small businesses.”

At the conference, which was attended by about 500 women from around the world, Rural Women NZ’s resolution calling for “well trained and resourced quality maternity services and best outcomes for mother and baby, giving particular regard to the special needs and isolation of rural women” was adopted unanimously.

Other adopted resolutions included a call to ban the use of the “hazardous” chemical Bisphenol A (BPA), which is used in many plastic products; the need for governments to record the births of all children to ensure they are recognised as citizens, and a call to stop the practice of female genital mutilation, female circumcision and cutting, which endangers the health and lives of young girls.

Members are expected to take these adopted resolutions back to their home countries and advocate for their governments to action them.

‘Grow locally, benefit globally’ was the theme of the women in agriculture workshop, where some speakers expressed concern at the large increase in heart disease, diabetes and obesity as a result of changing diets. What to do with the growing volumes of food waste was also a hot topic.

ACWW has been leading on water issues for many years, funding and supporting water storage and purifying projects in many countries.

Recognising the importance of education to help raise families out of poverty, Rural Women NZ members gave $1000 worth of books to local Indian school children, with funds raised earlier in the year at our ‘Women Walk the World’ events. . .

 

 


No to state funding

October 15, 2013

Labour’s Sua William Sio is suggesting local body election candidates get state funding for their campaigns.

Thankfully Local Government Minister Chris Tremain shows no enthusiasm for the idea.

“There hasn’t been an appetite from our government for state funding of local government elections, or national elections for that matter, outside of national television advertising.”

If it was up to me there would be no public funding of TV advertising either.

If individuals and parties want to be elected they should fund their own campaigns or persuade supporters to help them.

There are far greater calls for public funds than political campaigns.


October 15 in history

October 15, 2013

70 BC  Virgil, Roman poet, was born (d. 19 BC).

533  Byzantine general Belisarius made his formal entry into Carthage, having conquered it from the Vandals.

1582 Pope Gregory XIII implemented the Gregorian calendar. In Italy, Poland, Portugal, and Spain, October 4 of this year was followed directly by October 15.

1764 Edward Gibbon observed a group of friars singing in the ruined Temple of Jupiter in Rome, which inspired him to begin work on The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.

1783 The Montgolfier brothers‘ hot air balloon marked the first human ascent, by Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier, (tethered balloon).

1793 Queen Marie-Antoinette was tried and condemned in a swift, pre-determined trial.

1815 Napoleon I of France began his exile on Saint Helena.

1844 Friedrich Nietzsche, German philosopher, was born (d. 1900).

1863  American Civil War: The H. L. Hunley, the first submarine to sink a ship, sank during a test, killing its inventor, Horace L. Hunley.

1864  American Civil War: The Battle of Glasgow was fought, resulting in the surrender of Glasgow, Missouri and its Union garrison, to the Confederacy.

1877 Sir Geroge Grey, former Governor, became Premier of New Zealand.

Former Governor Grey becomes Premier

1878  The Edison Electric Light Company began operation.

1880  Mexican soldiers killed Victorio, one of the greatest Apache military strategists.

1881 P. G. Wodehouse, British novelist, was born (d. 1975).

1888 The “From Hell” letter sent by Jack the Ripper was received by the investigators.

1894  Alfred Dreyfus was arrested for spying.

1908 John Kenneth Galbraith, Canadian-born US economist, was born (d. 2006).

1917 World War I: Dutch dancer Mata Hari was executed by firing squad for spying for the German Empire.

1920 Mario Puzo, American novelist, was born (d. 1999).

1924 Lee Iacocca, American industrialist, was born.

1928 The airship, the Graf Zeppelin completed its first trans-Atlantic flight.

1932 Tata Airlines (later to become Air India) made its first flight.

1934 The Soviet Republic of China collapsed when Chiang Kai-shek’s National Revolutionary Army successfully encircled Ruijin, forcing the fleeing Communists to begin the Long March.

1939 The New York Municipal Airport (later renamed La Guardia Airport) was dedicated.

1944  The Arrow Cross Party took power in Hungary.

1945 World War II: The former premier of Vichy France Pierre Laval was shot by a firing squad for treason.

1946  Nuremberg Trials: Hermann Göring poisoned himself the night before his execution.

1951  Mexican chemist Luis E. Miramontes conducted the very last step of the first synthesis of norethisterone, the progestin that would later be used in one of the first two oral contraceptives.

1953  British nuclear test Totem 1 detonated at Emu Field, South Australia.

1956  Fortran, the first modern computer language, was shared with the coding community for the first time.

1959 Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, was born.

1965 Vietnam War: The National Coordinating Committee to End the War in Vietnam stages the first public burning of a draft card in the United States to result in arrest under a new law.

1966  Black Panther Party was created by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale.

1970 Thirty-five construction workers were killed when a section of the new West Gate Bridge in Melbourne collapsed.

1970  Aeroflot Flight 244 was hijacked and diverted to Turkey.

1971 The start of the 2500-year celebration of Iran, celebrating the birth of Persia.

1979  Black Monday in Malta. The Building of the Times of Malta, the residence of the opposition leader Eddie Fenech Adami and several Nationalist Party clubs were ransacked and destroyed by supporters of the Malta Labour Party.

1987  The Great Storm of 1987 hit France and England.

1990  Soviet Union leader Mikhail Gorbachev was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to lessen Cold War tensions and open up his nation.

1997  The first supersonic land speed record was set by Andy Green in ThrustSSC.

1997  The Cassini probe launched from Cape Canaveral on its way to Saturn.

2003  China launched Shenzhou 5, its first manned space mission.

2003 The Staten Island Ferry boat Andrew J. Barberi ran into a pier at the St. George Ferry Terminal, killing 11 people and injuring 43.

2007  Seventeen activists were arrested in the Ureweara in New Zealand’s first anti-terrorism raids.

'Anti-terror' raids in Urewera

2008 – The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 733.08 points, or 7.87%, the second worst day in the Dow’s history based on a percentage drop.

2011 – Global protests broke out in 951 cities in 82 countries.

Sourced from NZ History Online and Wikipedia


%d bloggers like this: