NZ will win with TPP

Trade Minister Tim Groser said there was no need for concern about the content of the Trans Pacific Partnership:

“When this deal is done, I am certain that I and the Prime Minister will be able to come in from of New Zealanders and say: ‘this is virtually all upside’.”

“In relative terms, New Zealand will gain more than any country in TPP … the structure of these massive protective barriers that will come down will benefit New Zealand more than any country in this negotiation.” . . .

. . .  Mr Groser . . . said concerns about intellectual property and patents under the TPP had been “wildly exaggerated”.

He said the United States is the “most innovative country in the world” so their intellectual property law could hardly chill innovation.

New Zealanders would not be paying more for drugs as a result of TPP, Mr Groser said.

“I’ve said categorically Pharmac is not on the table.”

ANZCO Foods chair Sir Graeme Harrison said New Zealand has a lot more to gain from the TPP now Japan’s in the negotiations.

He said:

New Zealand could bring in $5 billion per year in our exports now Japan was involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), compared to $3.5 billion without Japan.

The increase in exports to Japan could mean a 2% gain in GDP, with many of the gains in the primary industries, he said. . .

He said Japan’s inclusion has made the TPP more worthwhile for the United States, which in turn will work in New Zealand’s favour.

“All of this comes together with two countries, the world’s first and third largest economy, both believing in a rules-based trading system, that are on our side, and we can have quite an influence in that process.”

Both were speaking on The Nation yesterday. You can watch the full interviews here.

New Zealand has a very small domestic market and we have one of the most open economies in the world.

We’ve already gone through the hard part of giving up protection and puts us ahead of most of the other countries which are negotiating the TPP.

We have a lot to gain and very little to lose from the successful completion of the TPP agreement.

15 Responses to NZ will win with TPP

  1. Neil says:

    I get tired of the same people being trotted out against TPP like Jane Kelsey and Susan St John. Entirely predictable.
    As well, I think Rod Oram is dreadfully overexposed with his huge ego about matters economic

  2. Viv K says:

    The text of the TPP has been negotiated behind closed doors, but the few details that have come out are concerning. Only 5 of the 29 chapters are about trade. The rest includes new powers for corporations to sue governments if they introduce legislation that limits the corporation’s future ability to make profits. For example, the tobacco companies suing governments who introduce plain packaging. The same could apply to oil companies objecting to governments legislating to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is morally and ethically wrong for any current government to sign away future Parliament’s rights to make laws in the interest of that country’s citizens. I see those who value money above human rights have no problem with that.

  3. scrubone says:

    We’ve got to remember, that what is now the TPP started as an agreement between us ans Singapore. Others thought it was a good deal, and joined in and made it a group. It’s now other, big countries that want into the group. *They’re* asking to come in.

  4. Viv K says:

    It doesn’t matter who started the original discussions. The TPPA is shrouded in secrecy. What information has come out shows it is seriously flawed. Ele says ‘we have a lot to gain and very little to lose’. What evidence are you basing that claim on Ele? Have you seen the TPP text? American congressman Alan Grayson was one of those who helped get congressional representatives some access to the text. They can only request particular chapters, can’t show it to their staff, can’t take detailed notes and can’t talk about what they saw. Alan Grayson said ‘I can tell you it’s very bad for the future of America. I just can’t tell you why’. This level of secrecy is appalling and unjustifiable.

  5. scrubone says:

    What a silly thing to say.

  6. Paranormal says:

    Carry on the insular leftist scare mongering Viv. Don’t worry about the process that has been followed in all of these negotiations where the agreement is conducted in secret for obvious reasons. When the text is finally agreed it still has to be passed in open parliament. It’s at that time that we’ll all be able to see the final agreement.

    Interesting as well that you align yourself with insular politicians in the US. Could it be he is concerned about opening up fortress USA to us terrible furriners?

    And just for the record, do you believe it’s ok for a school to sue the government but no-one else?

  7. Viv K says:

    “When the text is finally agreed it still has to be passed in open parliament. It’s at that time that we’ll all be able to see the final agreement.”- can you or anyone else prove that statement to be true? Can all New Zealanders see the TPP BEFORE it is implemented?
    Putting a quote in is not ‘aligning yourself’ with someone.
    For the record Para, the issue is not WHO can sue the government, it is the laws against which that case will be judged that matter.

    Ele must be too busy to answer the question I asked yesterday at 9.01.

    Scrubone, if you’ve nothing constructive to say, why don’t you just go outside and play.

  8. homepaddock says:

    Re your comment @9:01 – evidence in the quotes and links in the post and knowledge of benefits gained from existing ree trade deals.

  9. TraceyS says:

    I know nothing about this issue so I’m not going to comment.

  10. Viv K says:

    Evidence Ele? 2 links to NBR articles quoting the opinions of Tim Groser and Sir Graeme Harrison and the third link is to the TV programme where they stated those opinions. I noted that most commenters on the 1st link brought up similar concerns to mine. Claiming that previous trade deals have been beneficial, so this one will be, is naive and no basis for accepting a secret deal. Paranormal said ‘when the text is finally agreed it still has to be passed in open parliament’. Is he correct? You’ve posted quite a few times about the TPP Ele, so I’m expecting you to know more than Tracey on this subject.

  11. JC says:

    “Claiming that previous trade deals have been beneficial, so this one will be, is naive and no basis for accepting a secret deal.”

    Why not? Afterall thats how we accepted CER and the Labour coalition of Greens, UF and NZ1st accepted the China, ASEAN, , Malaysia, Hong Kong deals and of course that coalition started the TPP negotiations.

    However where I differ in thinking with some commentators is the truism about trade and borders.. “if goods don’t cross borders, armies will,” sooner or later NZ must accept it will be invaded if it doesn’t trade with foreigners because we have too many natural advantages to ignore.. international trade arrangements where everyone gets an advantage is one of the few advantages we have to avoid this fate.

    Second, in any true trade arrangement .. every time without fail all the parties gain something and lose something.. thats why there had to be a negotiation in the first place to break the hold of the entrenched special interests that profit from lack of competition and political influence. Isolationists like the Greens correctly identify they lose influence when free trade rears its head and hard science crosses borders.

    JC

  12. Viv K says:

    Only 5 of 29 chapters are about trade JC. A deal that allows corporations to sue a country for compensation if future parliaments pass laws to protect that country’s environment or citizen’s health if those laws restrict the corporation’s ability to make future profits, is a bad deal. That is what has been leaked about the TPP and that is why people who are concerned about human rights and the environment want to know the details. Tim Groser and John Key saying ‘trust us’ won’t wash.

  13. Paranormal says:

    Viv IF that is what the agreement says then I think it is even better for New Zealand and the other partners. If governments can be held to account for their decisions then that is great. Note it’s not saying a government can’t make a new decision, just that it can be sued for compensation if it goes against previous agreements. I’m not a lawyer, but I think/hope you’ll find that the situation already exists at common law, this is just encapsulating that in an agreement.

  14. homepaddock says:

    Someone’s whose knowledge of constitutional matters is better than mine may correct me. But my understanding is that the agreement goes to parliament.

    If I remember correctly Winston Peters voted against the FTA with China when it went to parliament even though he was foreign minister at the time.

  15. JC says:

    “A deal that allows corporations to sue a country for compensation if future parliaments pass laws to protect that country’s environment or citizen’s health if those laws restrict the corporation’s ability to make future profits, is a bad deal.”

    It is of course a very good and ethical feature of international trade that a corporation that invests in good faith in another country can sue to protect itself from a govt acting in bad faith to change the law. Issues about the environment and health are red herrings because these are protected under any trade deal as a matter of course.

    One of the ironies since the Treaty of Westphalia is that countries or groups protesting their sovereignty are indulging in.. or about to indulge in abuses to human rights or other laws and ethics that would be frowned on by other countries.

    JC

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