Word of the day

October 11, 2013

Hornswoggle – to get the better of someone by cheating or deception; bamboozle, cheat, deceive hoax, hoodwink, hoax or swindle.


Agri-woman Next Business Woman of Year

October 11, 2013

Lindy Nelson who set up the Agri-Women’s Development Trust has been named Next’s Business Woman of the Year.

Photo: Congratulations to Lindy Nelson who has just been named as Next magazines Business Woman of the Year!

The AWDT was set up to harness the vast source of untapped potential in New Zealand rural women to address challenges facing rural business, communities & people.

Our programmes actively support women to find solutions for sustainable, thriving communities and NZ as a whole – through business opportunities, community engagement & education.

We take a long-term stake in each woman’s future, standing alongside them to build networks and grow skills. We aim to share our tailor-made resources & partnerships for the greater good.

 


Rural round-up

October 11, 2013

Effluent may be power house for farmers – Collette Devlin:

Effluent – often a headache for Southland dairy farmers – could soon prove beneficial by offsetting electricity bills, recent research shows.

As part of the Southland Energy Strategy, Venture Southland has been working with farm consultants, Scandrett Rural, Niwa, and EECA trialling the capture of methane emissions from covered anaerobic effluent ponds on dairy farms.

The principle behind the project was to demonstrate that methane could be used as an energy source to reduce electricity use on farms and also reduce greenhouse emissions. . .

Jealous Jillaroo – Jackaroo Joins the Largest Drove In Aussie Memory – Jillaroo Jess:

Something very exciting is happening in eastern Australia at the moment. Well, not for me, I’m stuck at home taking care of the farm. Jackaroo has been lucky enough to be involved in the biggest drove in Australian history. A ‘drove’, is moving cattle/sheep from one place to another, feeding them along the way. They can be very long and hard distances travelled. Often, drovers live on the road, going from one job to the next. Cattle baron Tom Brinkworth has taken advantage of the drought and bad cattle prices by buying 18,000 head of cattle from the ages of 8months to 2yrs old. These cattle are being taken down the TSR (Travelling Stock Route), or ‘The Long Paddock’ to their new properties, some 2500km away (over 1500miles). The herd has been split up into 9 mobs, and are travelling 10km a day. There is about 80km/8days between the different mobs of cattle. . .

Let’s smash a cartel today – Tim Worstall:

I’ve pointed out here before that parts of the fertiliser industry seem to be run as a cartel. Now we’ve evidence that much of the fertiliser industry is run as a cartel.

C. Robert Taylor and Diana L. Moss have written “The Fertilizer Oligopoly: The Case for Antitrust Enforcement,” as a monograph for the American Antitrust Institute. Those looking for examples of possibly anticompetitive behavior, whether for classroom examples or for other settings, will find the argument intriguing.

The effect of which is:

Taylor and Moss write: “Damages from supra-competitive pricing of fertilizer likely amount to tens of billions of dollars annually, the direct effects of which are felt by farmers and ranchers. But consumers all over the world suffer indirectly from cartelization of the fertilizer industry through higher food prices, particularly low income and subsistence demographics. … [I]t is clear that corporate and political control of essential plant nutrients may be one of the most severe competition issues facing national economies today.”

Part of the detail of how the cartel works is that it is not allowed to affect domestic US prices (Ho ho). So therefore the richest farmers in the world are not affected: but all of the poor world ones are. . .

New appointments to Biosecurity  Ministerial Advisory Committee :

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has announced five new appointments to the Biosecurity Ministerial Advisory Committee today.

The Committee plays an important role in providing the Minister with independent advice on the performance of New Zealand’s biosecurity system as a whole, and on specific biosecurity issues where necessary.

“Biosecurity is my number one priority, and hugely important to New Zealand as a trading nation,” says Mr Guy.

“A world class biosecurity system protects New Zealand from unwanted pests and diseases. This is essential for working towards our goal of doubling the value of our primary sector exports to $64 billion by 2025. . .

New Zealand’s diversity recognised at International Wine and Spirit Competition:

New Zealand’s diverse wine styles have stolen the show at the prestigious UK-based International Wine and Spirit Competition (IWSC). In the results released today, New Zealand wines beat all international competition to win not only the international Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Noir Trophies, but the Chardonnay Trophy as well, while Gold Outstanding Medals went to a Gewürztraminer and a dessert Riesling. . .

Ceres Wines wins the coveted IWSC Bouchard Finlayson Pinot Noir Trophy:

Ceres Wines, a tiny artisan wine producer from Bannockburn in Central Otago, has won the coveted International Wine and Spirit Competition (IWSC) Bouchard Finlayson trophy for Pinot Noir. The trophy is awarded to the top Pinot Noir from entries received from around the globe. It is the third time in a row that the trophy has been awarded to wines produced in Central Otago, with Peregrine receiving the award in 2011 and Valli in 2012. . .

Re-wire on a Hayes Roast:

Hayes Roast is this season’s new addition to the offering at Hayes Engineering & Homestead, a Central Otago property cared for by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT).

“It’s been inspired by the inventions and ingenuity visitors experience at the site,” says Property Manager Scott Elliffe.

“We believe Ernest Hayes – inventor of the Hayes wire strainer that is still in use in farms around the world – would have quickly adapted to the new market of urban trail riders biking past his front door and developed a roasting machine to meet their needs for ‘city coffee, country food’.”

In partnership with Vivace Coffee, the NZHPT asked third generation artisan master roaster Bernard Smith to develop a blend of three original coffee beans that best emulated the strength of the site, the body of the ‘big skies’ Central Otago landscape and the sweetness of its sun overhead. . .


Whale on air?

October 11, 2013

RadioLive might be looking for a new afternoon host to replace John Tamihere who is working towards a political comeback.

Rachel Glucina’s picks for his replacement to work with Willie Jackson are:

1. Cameron Slater – He’s polarising and partisan, but can cross-pollinate via his widely viewed website.

2. Linda Clark – Her school ma’am whip-cracking is TV gold, but she’s unlikely to forgo Chapman Tripp responsibilities.

3. Paul Henry – If he actually liked talkback he’d be a welcome return. He’s in the MediaWorks stable and his TV show is yet to have a start date, so maybe he can be persuaded.

4. Mark Sainsbury – He wants a job in media and is already a contributor to the station.

5. Grant Dalton – Does he have a job? He’s certainly got plenty of opinions, mostly sporting, unfortunately.

6. Anna Guy – She’s desperate to be a media star, but with a fifth kid on the way and limited views beyond motherhood and Feilding farming she’s an unlikely contender.

7. Rachel Hunter – She’s a bona fide media star with a big TV following. But can she make the transition to radio?

A bit of tension and strong differences of opinion between hosts can be good on radio.

You’d certainly get that with Jackson and Slater who are just about polar opposites on the political spectrum.


Friday’s answers

October 11, 2013

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: For a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.?

2.  Who wrote An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (usually shortened to The Wealth of Nations)?

3. It’s impôt in French, imposta in Italian, impuesto in Spanish and tāke  in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What is tax freedom day?

5. If you were designing the tax system what principle would guide you?

Points for answers:

The electronic oven is busy baking electronic chocolate cakes for everyone who got a clean sweep:

Rob, Willdwan, Bulaman, Armchair Critic and Alwyn.

Paranormal sneaks in with the presumption that too easy meant you knew all the answers even though you didn’t give them.

And Grant gets there too – your definition of tax freedom day isn’t the most common one but it is used.

Read the rest of this entry »


Friendly Bay playground opening

October 11, 2013

Oamaru Harbour is being rediscovered.

In its hey day in the late 1800s and early last century it was a bustling port.

Even 50 years ago, it still had regular visits from ships taking freight in and out.

The safe bay was also popular with families and it has stayed as a harbour for fishing and leisure boats.

But over the years the harbour closed to shipping and nature’s impact made the beach less hospitable.

Then the world discovered the little blue penguins which nest around the harbour and the town capitalised on the tourist potential.

Businesses followed – craftspeople, a restaurant, a cafe and over the last year or so a steampunk themed playground has been developed.

It’s being opened at 5:30 this evening.

 

JUST A REMINDER In case it had slipped your mind. . . Be good to see 5,000 people here. Fingers crossed for warmer weather


Heritage trumps safety

October 11, 2013

Quote of the day:

. . . Deaths in earthquakes are somewhat unavoidable. But deaths caused by regulatory structures that force that little value is placed on human life, or that prevent a building owner from tearing down a building very likely to kill a pile of people in a quake, are worse than tragic – they’re stupid. Offsetting Behaviour.

It’s in a post on heritage rules which make some buildings untouchable and how the burden of providing the heritage amenity falls on the owner of the building.

He has a better idea:

I’ve suggested an alternative structure where we run heritage protection as an on-budget Council expenditure. Have each Council decide how much money they’re willing to put into heritage preservation, perhaps have Central provide a matching grant, and open it up to further voluntary contributions from the public. Then, have the heritage boards decide how and where they want to spend the money – paying building owners for the amenities they provide. This would force some consideration of the cost of providing some heritage amenities and focus preservation efforts on where they’re most cost effective. . .

If the public values something private and takes away the rights of the owner, the public must be prepared to pay.

As it stands heritage is trumping both property rights and safety and this is what will happen.

The next step in the fracas that the future of the Harcourts building in Lambton Quay has become is likely to result in Wellington’s own version of the Marie Celeste, that abandoned ghost ship of the Atlantic.

After all the to-ings and fro-ings to get the only commercially viable option of demolition and rebuilding approved, the owner has pulled the plug and intends to cordon off and abandon the building for safety reasons because its heritage value is apparently unique but unaffordable to retain. . .

Buildings will be abandoned, become eyesores and still be dangerous.


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