Word of the day

July 10, 2013

Scream – utter a long, loud, piercing cry or cries expressing extreme emotion or pain; emit a shrill, piercing sound; speak or write with intense or hysterical emotion; laugh immoderately or uncontrollably; shout or speak shrilly, especially with harsh or exaggerated words; produce harsh high tones; produce a vivid startling effect; a loud sharp penetrating cry or noise; a very funny person or thing.

When I’ve calmed down and regained my sense of humour I’ll explain why this word came to mind.  Suffice to say for now, 0800 numbers and call centres were involved.


Rural round-up

July 10, 2013

Fonterra price scheme proves popular – Jamie Gray:

Fonterra’s guaranteed milk price (GMP) pilot scheme for the current season has proven so popular that it has required scaling, the co-operative dairy giant said.

Fonterra said 328 farms have applied to supply 37 million kg of milk solids for the scheme but that it had maintained the size of the pilot at the targeted 15 million kgMS, about one per cent of its total milk supply.

As a result all applicants were scaled to 40 per cent of their requested kgMS, with a minimum threshold of 10 per cent of a farm’s production. . .

Synlait Milk sets share price at $2.20 a piece:

Synlait Milk will sell shares at $2.20 apiece before joining the NZX later this month, valuing the dairy processor at $322 million and making it the 43rd biggest company on the exchange.

The Rakaia-based company plans to raise $75 million of new capital, and existing shareholders will sell $38.7 million, or 17.6 million shares, in a secondary offer, listing on July 23, Synlait Milk said in a statement.

Cornerstone shareholder Bright Dairy and Food won’t participate in the offer, reducing its holding to about 39 percent from the 51 percent it acquired in 2010 after Synlait abandoned an earlier plan to go public because of tepid investor appetite after the global financial crisis. . .

Huge opportunity with Icebreaker – Sally Rae:

Nicola Simpson is a firm believer in taking opportunities as they come.

She was on holiday with her family at Pounawea when she checked her emails and found a message ”out of the blue” asking if she would be interested in joining merino clothing company Icebreaker.

It meant moving from Wanaka to Auckland, a city where the family had lived before, but it was a ”huge opportunity”, she said. . .

LGNZ Welcomes New Dairy Accord:

Local Government New Zealand has welcomed the new Sustainable Dairying: Water Accord released at Parliament today.

The Accord, which involves two tiers of “accountable” and “supporting” partnerships between a number of dairy industry bodies and agri-businesses, also lists 15 regional and unitary councils as “Friends of the Accord.” . . .


Who pays how much tax?

July 10, 2013

Many on the left want to give more to the poor and pay for it by increasing taxes on the rich.

But Finance Minister Bill English explains that our tax and welfare policies already provide for a high degree of redistribution with wealthy people paying a high proportion of tax and poorer people paying no net tax at all.

New Zealand’s tax and income support systems significantly redistribute incomes to households most in need, which was reinforced by the Government’s tax changes in 2010, Finance Minister Bill English says.

“The Government has maintained a redistributive tax and income support system that supports low and middle income families and helps New Zealanders through times of need,” he said in a speech to the Trans-Tasman Business Circle in Wellington today.

“So at any particular time, a large number of households effectively don’t pay tax.

“The amount these households pay in income tax is exceeded by the amount they receive from welfare benefits, Working for Families, paid parental leave and accommodation subsidies. That’s entirely appropriate for those families genuinely in need.

“At the same time, we also expect people to get back into work when they are able to. The Government is supporting them to do that through significant extra investment in welfare reforms.”

Using data from the Household Economic Survey, the Treasury estimates that this year households earning over $150,000 a year – the top 12 per cent of households by income – will pay 46 per cent of income tax.

But when benefit payments, Working for Families, paid parental leave and accommodation support are taken into account, these 12 per cent of households are expected to pay 76 per cent of the net income tax. And that is before New Zealand Superannuation payments are counted.

By contrast, households earning under $60,000 a year – which is half of all households – are expected to pay 11 per cent of income tax.

“When we take income support payments into account, as a group they will actually pay no net income tax at all,” Mr English says.

“That’s because the $2.7 billion of income tax they are expected to pay will be more than offset by the $8.1 billion they will receive in income support.”

Estimates of net income tax paid by household income, before and after Budget 2010, indicate the system has become more progressive over this period, Mr English says.

Households earning less than $60,000 are generally expected to pay less, in percentage terms, towards net tax in 2013/14 than they were paying in 2008/09. 

Conversely, households earning more than $150,000 are generally paying more of the net tax than they were in 2008/09.   

“It’s appropriate to maintain a tax and income support system that helps low and middle income households when they most need it.

“But people who call for even greater transfers to low income families, or who call for the top tax rate to be raised, need to be aware of how redistributive the tax and income support system really is,” Mr English says.

“This also highlights the importance of Government policies to support people out of welfare and into work.”

Net tax paid by households, estimated for the tax year ending 31 March 2014

No of households Income tax paid Transfers rec’d Net tax paid

000

%

$m

%

$m

%

$m

%

$0-$10,000

50

3%

15

0%

343

3%

-329

-2%

$10,001-$20,000

137

8%

238

1%

2,520

24%

-2,282

-15%

$20,001-$30,000

235

14%

386

2%

2,308

22%

-1,923

-13%

$30,001-$40,000

193

12%

545

2%

1,452

14%

-907

-6%

$40,001-$50,000

117

7%

638

3%

876

8%

-238

-2%

$50,001-$60,000

106

6%

835

3%

595

6%

240

2%

$60,001-$70,000

98

6%

988

4%

685

7%

303

2%

$70,001-$80,000

106

6%

1,316

5%

434

4%

882

6%

$80,001-$90,000

83

5%

1,191

5%

308

3%

882

6%

$90,001-$100,000

84

5%

1,398

6%

119

1%

1,279

9%

$100,001-$110,000

72

4%

1,387

5%

161

2%

1,226

8%

$110,001-$120,000

53

3%

1,148

5%

67

1%

1,081

7%

$120,001-$130,000

53

3%

1,301

5%

94

1%

1,207

8%

$130,001-$140,000

45

3%

1,211

5%

122

1%

1,089

7%

$140,001-$150,000

36

2%

1,077

4%

38

0%

1,039

7%

$150,001-$175,000

69

4%

2,360

9%

139

1%

2,221

15%

$175,001-$200,000

53

3%

2,205

9%

90

1%

2,115

14%

$200,001-$225,000

22

1%

1,090

4%

55

1%

1,035

7%

$225,001-$250,000

18

1%

1,015

4%

22

0%

993

7%

$250,001+

46

3%

4,940

20%

13

0%

4,927

33%

Total

1,676

100%

25,283

100%

10,442

100%

14,841

100%

Source: Treasury, calculated from the Household Economic Survey 2010/11.

Note:

  • Income bands are based on total taxable household income including government transfers and NZ Superannuation, before tax.

Gross transfers are all transfers except NZ Superannuation, but including benefits, Working for Families, paid parental leave and accommodation subsidies.

The column showing the percentage of tax paid fell off the side of the post:

Net tax paid

$m

%

-329

-2%

-2,282

-15%

-1,923

-13%

-907

-6%

-238

-2%

240

2%

303

2%

882

6%

882

6%

1,279

9%

1,226

8%

1,081

7%

1,207

8%

1,089

7%

1,039

7%

2,221

15%

2,115

14%

1,035

7%

993

7%

4,927

33%

14,841

100%

Households aren’t paying any net tax until their income gets above $50,000.

While the highest earning households pay 46 per cent of income tax.

Few would argue against helping the genuinely needy but these figures show that too many people aren’t earning enough to pay net tax.

This reinforces the importance of aspirational policies which get people off welfare into work, equip more people for better paying jobs and promotes economic growth which enable businesses to prosper so they can afford higher wages.


First stage of fresh water policy finalised

July 10, 2013

In a speech launching the first stage of a national fresh water policy, environment Minister Amy Adams says:

. . . Already, more than $450 million has been committed to cleaning up some of our most iconic rivers, lakes and wetlands.

It would be much better, though, if we prevented pollution of our waterways in the first place, rather than leaving our children and grandchildren to face a legacy of poor water quality and ever-increasing clean-up costs.

We all want an end to the conflict – the costs and the delays that many of us face when planning for activities that use or affect our fresh water.

It seems that too often water disputes are determined by who has the best lawyers, the biggest chequebook, and in the long term, the health of our waterways has not necessarily been well-served by that approach.

It is time to stop focussing on the issues that divide us, rather than the values around water that we all share.

As our population grows and our land use intensifies, the time is overdue to reassess our approach to managing water.

There is too much at stake if we don’t take action.

New Zealand’s economy depends on the productive sector, which, of course, depends on water.

We produce fruit and vegetables worth more than $5 billion-a-year.

Dairying earns $13 billion-plus-a-year in exports, and tourism earns $10 billion-a-year

Think, too, of the contributions from pastoral farming and forestry.

But, this is not just about the dollars. Horticulture employs 50,000 people and the dairy industry employs another 45,000.

That is around 95,000 people – and their families – that rely on just two of the many industries that rely on access to fresh water.

Paradoxically water is both a renewable and a limited resource. We need better tools to manage it, and we need to consider whether decisions around water management are being made at the right level and with the right community inputs.

To deal with these challenges, we are facing difficult decisions. We have to consider and make trade-offs between the many and often conflicting values we hold around water. It is after all, a shared resource.

There is also the difficulty that when we talk about balance in the context of resource management, there is a perception that we have to pit the environment against the economy.

This is not an either/or question – we want to be able to apply the broad judgement that was originally intended under the Resource Management Act.

Our economy depends on the environment. Equally, a strong economy gives us the ability to address environmental concerns. This is about the economy and the environment.

But, we are now facing increasing risks to both.

In addition, we all have responsibility to ensure we are using our natural resources in a way that is fair to the generations that are still to be born. . .

Part of the problem isn’t what people are doing now, it’s what happened in the past.

Pollution resulting from poor management or poor decisions in the past can take decades to show up in our waterways, so it is quite likely that things will get worse before they get better.

Water is a key ingredient of economic growth, but the value we get from it is not just about the economy; it is also about water’s value in sustaining life and for recreation, and its role in our national identity.

It is clear we need to make changes if we are to continue to enjoy and benefit from it.

The Government has been working on a package of cohesive reform that will lead to more productive and sustainable use of our freshwater resource within a generation. . .

Work on this began four years ago when the Land and Water Forum was tasked with agreeing on the problems, and some possible ways of tackling them.

This was the genesis of the Fresh Start for Freshwater reforms.

In 2011, we progressed the Forum’s recommendations by introducing the first of three major initiatives.

We introduced a limits-based regime for freshwater management through the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management.  A key requirement of the NPS is that overall water quality in all regions must be maintained or improved.

Our second initiative was to put $15 million over two years into a special fund devoted to partnership arrangements with councils and communities to clean up six lakes, rivers and wetlands.

And thirdly, we set up the Irrigation Acceleration Fund. In this year’s Budget, the Government has committed $80 million to invest in regional irrigation schemes as the first stage of its commitment to invest up to $400 million. 

Building on the recommendations in the three reports of the Land and Water Forum, and on on-going advice from Iwi Leaders, the Government released a discussion document on a comprehensive and integrated package of proposals for freshwater reform in March this year.

More than 2000 people attended 50 meetings and hui around the country in March and April to give their views.

I am happy to report that there was broad support for the overall direction of the water reform proposals.

Today, I am pleased to announce that the Government intends to introduce amendments to the Resource Management Act in a Bill to be introduced to the House this year to begin to deal with these issues.

First and foremost, we accept the Land and Water Forum’s recommendation to include a collaborative option for freshwater planning.

Currently, council staff draft a plan then consult on it – often described as a decide, announce defend approach – which is then followed, potentially, by years of litigation.

Instead, we will provide an option where people and organisations drawn from the community can work together, reflecting their diverse values in setting objectives and limits for their local freshwater resources.

Councils and communities that invest time and energy in the early stages of the planning process are more likely to produce better and more durable decisions because of their involvement.

Getting agreement upfront in the planning process will mean less litigation further down the track, which will increase certainty for everyone, and ultimately, save time and money.

We will not be compelling councils to choose a collaborative approach. Regions will still be able to use the existing Schedule 1 planning process if they choose, however, feedback on our proposals for freshwater reform showed there is significant support for collaboration.

Collaboration depends on the incentives being right for all those engaged, at all steps, to work together towards the best outcomes, and getting those incentives properly calibrated has been a critical part of the exercise.

Limiting appeals is one of the key tools for fostering consensus and incentivising upfront engagement, as are ensuring residual appeal rights are appropriately tethered to deviation from the collaboratively-reached decisions.

An important feature of this planning option is the flexibility in how collaboration can operate region-by-region. It is critical that the Government provides guidance and support, as councils and communities adopt to this new way of working to ensure success.

Additionally, we are also clarifying and enhancing provisions for iwi/Māori views to be explicitly considered before planning decisions on fresh water are made, no matter whether councils choose the collaborative option or the existing Schedule 1 process.

We accept that the current regime is not working as intended for Māori, and that while final decisions are reserved for council, those decisions must be properly informed by all relevant information, including iwi views.

There are many examples of iwi/Māori participating successfully in freshwater management processes.  But I am hearing that there have also been differing expectations and some confusion about their role.

This has led to uncertainty, costs and delays while matters are debated in the courts and some iwi have looked to Treaty of Waitangi settlements to ensure their interests are considered. I want to stress that those Treaty settlement outcomes will be protected.

The Iwi Leaders Group has worked directly on these reforms with us, and I was gratified by the keen interest and positive response from iwi through the consultation hui in March and April.

As I have said, central government will work closely with regional councils to provide guidance and best practice information for implementing the changes. We are all in this together and your input is critical – whether you are from a regional council, an environmental organisation, an iwi group or the productive or energy sectors.

The Ministry for the Environment is working with regional councils and scientists to improve the quality and consistency of data that we need for making sound decisions on freshwater use and management.

National requirements will continue to be provided for through the freshwater national policy statement, which gives councils clear direction to maintain and improve the quality of water in their catchments, as well as the use of the Environmental Protection Authority to assess and progress nationally-significant resource consents, and Water Conservation Orders to protect our wild and scenic rivers.

Despite the recent furore, I want to emphasise that we had not proposed to make any changes to existing Water Conservation Orders, or in any way reduce the important protections they provide.

Rather we wanted to make sure that new applications would not be used to undermine or derail the new collaborative planning efforts that we are fostering.

However, following feedback during the freshwater consultation we have decided that, given goodwill from stakeholders, there is a low risk of Water Conservation Orders being used in this way.

We will, therefore, give the reforms time to bed in before we look at how the Water Conservation Orders process fits with regional planning.

Other parts of the immediate steps for the freshwater reforms include the creation of a National Objectives Framework and better water accounting.

It is the Government’s intention to this year make legislative amendments to facilitate the introduction of a National Objectives Framework.

In the meantime, work continues to progress the development of the National Objectives Framework, including detailed scientific work on populating the framework.

A further period of consultation will be carried out before final decisions on the design and detail of the framework are made.

Just before I finish, I want to touch on another area of work that complements the Government’s freshwater programme – credible state of the environment reporting.

The importance of this work was reinforced by last week’s release of Statistics NZ’s Environment Domain Plan.

The Domain Plan provides a useful picture of the official information about New Zealand’s environment and identifies what can be done to make improvements to this information.

The Government is committed to introducing independent environmental reporting that is underpinned by high quality, consistent statistics that provide a reliable, accurate, and integrated picture of the economy and the environment.

Before we are in a position to do this, we need to address the current barriers to getting reliable, consistent data that provides an integrated picture of the economy and the environment.

In the Government’s 2011 discussion document on environmental reporting, we signalled that changes to the Resource Management Act were required to enable the government to make regulations requiring local authorities and councils to monitor the environment according to specified priorities and methodologies.

This work was completed last year and changes to the Act are included in the Resource Management Reform Bill 2012, which had its second reading in parliament last month.

It is essential that improvements to the quality and accessibility of data are made so that we can debate the issues rather than the integrity of the data.

The Environment Ministry is currently in the midst of this work programme, with announcements likely to be made later this year.

This year is an exciting one for all parties interested in freshwater management reform.

As I have stated throughout this process, while the Government will work at pace to formulate durable solutions, we recognise that these issues are too important to rush.

The speech isn’t on-line yet but a media release on the policy is.

 


Feds, Fonterra back new water accord

July 10, 2013

Federated Farmers backs the new Sustainable Dairying Water Accord.

Federated Farmers is proud to join the Dairy Industry’s collective effort, the Sustainable Dairying: Water Accord, to lift dairying’s overall freshwater performance.  It forms part of a cogent strategy that could see dairying double its export value by 2025.

“Federated Farmers’ signature on the new Water Accord is the individual farmer’s commitment to do all we can to protect the water quality in our streams and rivers,” says Willy Leferink, Federated Farmers Dairy Chairperson.

“As dairy farmers we have to lift our game on water quality.  If we want to meet the aspirations we have as an industry. If we want to meet government expectations and earn the respect of the wider community, then farming sustainably is the way ahead.

“As Federated Farmers we know that success won’t be measured by our leading farmers or even those in the peloton.  It will hinge on how we can successfully lift the farming and environmental performance of our lower performing farmers. 

“Those two go hand-in-hand because livestock thrive only with good quality water.

The majority of farmers are doing all that’s required but the industry, and the environment, are being let down by a few who need to make substantial improvements.

“I would like to make a special plea to the media on behalf of farmers.  That is for media to invest time to understand what modern dairying is and more importantly, what it is not.

“Federated Farmers will make it possible for the media to get on-farm.  I know the science of what we do can be hard for the media to portray, let alone when consents, polices and systems are added to the mix, but we need facts and not slogans in the public domain. 

“That extends to water science where our industry-good body, DairyNZ, is doing fantastic work in 14 catchments.  Having met some of their water quality scientists the calibre of talent they have is truly impressive.  While water quality scientists, they are also true communicators.

“With water, we need to realise there is no ‘one shoe fits all’ solution.  Each catchment faces different issues demanding different solutions to those issues.

“We know in Rotorua that the formula, “Councils+Farmers+Community = Results,” works.

“As farmers we also recognise that we impact the environment.  That is why this Water Accord exists because it is about us farmers owning the issue from the farm gate right throughout the supply chain to the finished product.

“Because dairying is so upfront, we create a small risk that some people will believe it is all down to us when it’s not.  To succeed we need a joined-up effort made up of councils, dairy companies, fertiliser companies in concert with local businesses and local communities. 

“Improving water also needs the input of our colleagues from the wider primary industries too. 

“Because a lot of what we do is green technology, from the colour of our pasture to the recycling of nutrients, this is about Green Dairying.

“All farmers care about land and water because we farm where we and our children live.  That makes us highly motivated to ensure the Sustainable Dairying: Water Accord works because its success becomes our industry’s success,” Mr Leferink concluded.

The accord also has Fonterra’s backing:

 

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited is right behind the dairy industry’s new Sustainable Dairying: Water Accord (SDWA) and has the programmes in place to ensure its goals are achieved.

Fonterra’s Co-operative Affairs Managing Director Todd Muller said today that the Accord was a necessary step up for the New Zealand dairy industry as a whole.

“Consumers and customers around the world are demanding more from their food suppliers in terms of environmental performance and origin of products. To be successful and protect New Zealand’s reputation as the origin for the world’s best quality milk, dairy companies need to connect and respond to this changing picture. The launch of the SDWA is a great example of how this can be achieved through a pan-industry agreement.”

Mr Muller said Fonterra’s Supply Fonterra programme, as well as the earlier Dairying and Clean Stream Accord which Fonterra established in 2003, meant Fonterra farmers would be well placed to meet the new Accord goals after investing millions of dollars over the past nine years on environmental improvements.

“It’s important to recognise huge progress is being made. Fonterra suppliers are working hard to have cows excluded from waterways by the December 2013 deadline set out in Supply Fonterra. This includes mapping waterways on Fonterra farms and agreeing work plans with farmers who are still working towards completing stock exclusion by December.

“We are also working with our farmers and providing the support they need to achieve other targets set out in Supply Fonterra and the Accord. To do this we have increased our Sustainable Dairying Advisory team from four to 17.”

Commenting further on the SDWA, Mr Muller said: “No one group can make this happen on its own, it is great to see farmers, their dairy companies, regional councils, DairyNZ, and others all coming together to improve New Zealand’s water quality.”

We all want clean water and those of us who live closest to it, drink it, wash with it and swim in it have the greatest interest in ensuring we get it.

 


Reports of death greatly exagerated

July 10, 2013

The promised news of a Labour leadership coup last night failed to materialise.

Looks like reports of the death of David Shearer’s leadership are, like the premature announcement of the demise of Mark Twain, greatly exaggerated – at least for now.

But unless and until polling shows a significant increase in the popularity of both the party and its leader the rumblings will continue.

It’s good political theatre for political tragics but those in Labour who want a change should remember politics is a team game.

Changing the leader without addressing the underlying problems which beset the party will at best give a temporary fillip to the party’s fortunes.

The not so good ship Labour hit the man ban iceberg. Rearranging the captaincy won’t be enough by itself to steer the ship back to electoral success.


July 10 in history

July 10, 2013

48 BC Battle of Dyrrhachium: Julius Caesar barely avoids a catastrophic defeat to Pompey in Macedonia.

988 The city of Dublin was founded on the banks of the river Liffey.

1212 The most severe of several early fires of London burns most of the city to the ground.

1452  King James III of Scotland  was born (d. 1488).

1460 Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick defeated  the king’s Lancastrian forces and took King Henry VI prisoner in the Battle of Northampton.

1499  Portuguese explorer Nicolau Coelho returned to Lisbon, after discovering the sea route to India as a companion of Vasco da Gama.

1509  John Calvin, French religious reformer, was born  (d. 1564).

1553 Lady Jane Grey took the throne of England.

1584 William I of Orange was assassinated by Balthasar Gérard.

1645  English Civil War: The Battle of Langport.

1778 American Revolution: Louis XVI of France  declared war on the Kingdom of Great Britain.

1789 Alexander Mackenzie reached the Mackenzie River delta.

1802 Robert Chambers, Scottish author and naturalist, was born  (d. 1871).

1804  – Emma Smith, Inaugural President of the Women’s Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was born (d. 1879).

1806 The Vellore Mutiny, the first instance of a mutiny by Indian sepoys against the British East India Company.

1821 The United States took possession of its newly bought territory of Florida from Spain.

1830 Camille Pissarro, French painter, was born  (d. 1903).

1850  Millard Fillmore was inaugurated as the 13th President of the United States.

1859 Big Ben rang for the first time.

1864  Austin Chapman, Australian policitian, was born (d. 1926).

1871  Marcel Proust, French writer, was born (d. 1922).

1875  Mary McLeod Bethune, American educator, was born (d. 1955).

1903 John Wyndham, British author, was born (d. 1969).

1909 Donald Sinclair, British hotel manager, inspiration for Fawlty Towers, was born  (d. 1981).

1913  Death Valley, California hit 134 °F (~56.7 °C), the highest temperature recorded in the United States.

1921 Belfast’s Bloody Sunday: 16 people were killed and 161 houses destroyed during rioting and gun battles in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

1921 Harvey Ball, American commercial artist, was born (d. 2001).

1925 Meher Baba began his silence of 44 years. His followers observe Silence Day on this date in commemoration.

1925 Scopes Trial: The so-called “Monkey Trial” began with John T. Scopes, a young high school science teacher accused of teaching evolution in violation of the Butler Act.

1931 Alice Munro, Canadian writer, was born.

1938  Howard Hughes set a new record by completing a 91 hour flight around the world.

1940 Tom Farmer, Scottish entrepreneur, was born.

1940 World War II: the Vichy government is established in France.

1940  World War II: Battle of Britain – The German Luftwaffe began attacking British convoys in the English Channel thus starting the battle (this start date is contested).

1941 Jedwabne Pogrom: the massacre of Jewish people living in and near the village of Jedwabne in Poland.

1943 World War II: The launching of Operation Husky began the Italian Campaign.

1947 Arlo Guthrie, American musician, was born.

1947  Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah was recommended as the first Governor General of Pakistan by then Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Clement Attlee.

1951 Korean War: Armistice negotiations began.

1954 Neil Tennant, British musician (Pet Shop Boys), was born.

1962  Telstar, the world’s first communications satellite, is launched into orbit.

1966 The Chicago Freedom Movement, lead by Martin Luther King, held a rally at Soldier Field in Chicago, Illinois.

1967 New Zealand adpoted decimal currency.

NZ adopts decimal currency

1968 Maurice Couve de Murville became Prime Minister of France.

1973  The Bahamas gained full independence within the Commonwealth of Nations.

1973 – National Assembly of Pakistan passed a resolution on the recognition of Bangladesh.

1971  King Hassan II of Morocco survived an attempted coup d’etat, which lasts until June 11.

1976 The Seveso disaster in Italy.

1976   One American and three British mercenaries were executed in Angola following the Luanda Trial.

1978  President Moktar Ould Daddah of Mauritania was ousted in a bloodless coup d’état.

1980 Alexandra Palace burned down for a second time.

1985  Greenpeace vessel Rainbow Warrior was bombed and sank in Auckland harbour.

Rainbow Warrior sunk in Auckland harbour

1991 Boris Yeltsin began his 5-year term as the first elected President of Russia.

1991  The South African cricket team was readmitted into the International Cricket Council following the end of Apartheid.

1992 In Miami, Florida, former Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega is sentenced to 40 years in prison for drug and racketeering violations.

1997 Scientists reported the findings of the DNA analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton which supported the “out of Africa theory” of human evolution placing an “African Eve” at 100,000 to 200,000 years ago.

1997 – Partido Popular (Spain) member Miguel Ángel Blanco was kidnapped in the Basque city of Ermua by ETA members, sparking widespread protests.

1998 The Diocese of Dallas agreed to pay $23.4 million to nine former altar boys who claimed they were sexually abused by former priest Rudolph Kos.

2000 A leaking southern Nigerian petroleum pipeline explodes, killing about 250 villagers scavenging gasoline.

2000  EADS, the world’s second-largest aerospace group is formed by the merger of Aérospatiale-Matra, DASA, and CASA.

2002  At a Sotheby’s auction, Peter Paul Rubens’ painting The Massacre of the Innocents sold for £49.5million (US$76.2 million) to Lord Thomson.

2003 A bus collided with a truck, fell off a bridge on Tuen Mun Road, Hong Kong, and plunged into the underlying valley, killing 21 people.

2005  Hurricane Dennis slams into the Florida Panhandle, causing billions of dollars in damage.

2006 Pakistan International Flight PK-688 crashes in Multan, Pakistan, shortly after takeoff, killing all 45 people on board.

2008  Former Macedonian Interior Minister Ljube Boškoski is acquitted of all charges by a United Nations Tribunal accusing him of war crimes.

2011 – Russian cruise ship Bulgaria sunk in Volga near Syukeyevo, Tatarstan, leading to 122 deaths.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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