Word of the day

July 3, 2013

Etiolate – to make pale or sickly; make weak by stunting the growth or development of;  bleach and alter the natural development of (a green plant) by excluding sunlight; developed without chlorophyll by being deprived of light.


Rural round-up

July 3, 2013

Bacteria detector set to scale up for food industry – Peter Kerr at sticK:

I’m always a bit of a sucker for innovations and improvements that add value to our biological industries.

After all, as a country we’d be fools not to play to our major strength in producing food and fibre.

An innovation’s appeal is also greatly increased when it solves a problem – and in this particular case it is instantly identifying the presence of bacteria in food products.

It’s one reason I’m keen on seeing Veritide’s real-time, non-contact bacterial scanner gain more traction. (Note: Veritide’s in the process of updating its website following its pivot to concentrate on the food industry). . .

Synlait well structured for a successful future – Allan Barber:

Synlait Milk’s $120 million capital raising will enable the company to restructure debt and invest in several new initiatives, including a lactoferrin plant, a third dryer, a butter plant, testing laboratory and dry store. The share offer is made up of $75 million of new capital and $45 million sell down by some of the exiting shareholders.

All the signs point to this capital raising being a success, unlike the attempt to raise $150 million in 2009 which was shunned by New Zealand investors. . .

Fonterra to Invest $27 Million in New Dry Store at Te Rapa:

Fonterra has announced a $27 million investment in a dry store distribution centre at its Te Rapa site that will strengthen its Waikato operations and allow the Co-operative to deliver product more efficiently to its customers.

Fonterra’s Director Logistics Network, Mark Leslie, says the dry store will provide the Co-operative annual benefits of nearly $5m through reduced operating costs.

“Our seasonal production means that we store product until we receive orders. The new dry store will enable us to store product at the site of manufacture right through the peak of the season and to more efficiently manage the flow of goods through to our customers by better utilising the rail infrastructure out of our Crawford St distribution centre,” says Mr Leslie. . .

Reassessment of organophosphates and carbamates:

The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) is being congratulated by Federated Farmers for the difficult decisions it has made around the use of organophosphates and carbamates (OPC’s).

 “Extending the use of Diazinon through to 2028 was the right thing to do because farmers have little or no alternatives at this time,” says Dr William Rolleston, Federated Farmers Vice-President.

 “Home gardeners and farmers both know that diazinon is the most effective agrichemical we currently have to treat grass grub and porina. An issue may arise if by the end of the next 15-years we fail to have approved replacements in the toolbox. . .

New Crown Irrigation Chair welcomes opportunity:

The chair of the newly appointed Crown Irrigation Investments board, Alison Paterson, is welcoming the opportunity to help develop large-scale irrigation infrastructure.

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has this morning announced the establishment of the new company and the appointment of all members of the Establishment Board to the board of the new company. . . .

Crown irrigation investment company needs to act:

IrrigationNZ has congratulated the Government on the establishment of the new Crown company ‘Irrigation Investments Ltd’ – but signals action is needed quickly before opportunities are lost.

The $80million investment company was announced this week as a “bridging investor” to help irrigation projects that may not otherwise get off the ground. . .

OSPRI New Zealand looking to add value to the primary sector:

This week sees a new arrival in the primary sector with the launch of OSPRI New Zealand.

Formed on 1 July, following the merger of the Animal Health Board and NAIT, the national animal identification and tracing scheme, OSPRI has been set up to bring together existing expertise and, as its name implies, to provide creative operational solutions.

“We are excited by the prospect of developing some creative operational solutions for the sector,” said OSPRI Chief Executive William McCook. . .

New President for Veterinary Association:

 Dr Steve Merchant is the new President of the New Zealand Veterinary Association (NZVA). His first official public engagement is welcoming delegates at the opening plenary of the NZVA’s annual conference in Palmerston North this week (3 and 4 July).

He is a founding director of the Pet Doctors Group. Established in 2005, this is an expanding network of clinics made up of like-minded veterinarians who share resources and take a team-based approach to animal care. . .

New Avocado Exporter Lifts Earnings Forecast

Newly formed avocado exporter AVOCO has raised its forecast for this season’s earnings in Australia and now expects to hit the $50 million mark by the end of the harvest, which starts in late August.

Alistair Young, a director of AVOCO, says latest analysis of the potential harvest suggests there will be a better yield than usual, without it being a brilliant harvest. Formed recently by the two largest avocado exporters, AVOCO represents about 75% of all the growers in New Zealand and holds a similar-sized chunk of sales into the Australian market. . .

Praise Bee – industrious insects get the stamp of approval:

They’ve been celebrated in verse (by the likes of Emily Dickinson[1], William Blake[2] and Kahlil Gibran[3]) – in song (by the likes of Gloria Gaynor[4], Blake Shelton[5] and Owl City[6]) – and in popular culture (with spelling bees, ‘Buzzy Bees’ and Wellington’s own ‘Beehive’). But the humble bee stands poised to get a new tribute this week, with the release of a special set of postage stamps.

The Honey Bees stamp issue celebrates the industrious insects on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the National Beekeepers’ Association of New Zealand.

Honey bees, which are of European origin, have played a key role in New Zealand horticulture for over 150 years – pollinating essential crops and producing up to 12,000 tonnes of honey per annum, with as much as half of that being exported. . .


If

July 3, 2013

If you could invite any five (ish) people, living or dead* for dinner, who would you choose?

(* we’re assuming they’re miraculously alive and well enough to enjoy dining).


iPlods on the beat

July 3, 2013

Issuing police with  smartphones and tablets is smart policy.
Recently I accompanied local Police on a night shift and I can see that they are more effective on the front line than doing paperwork. New technology will give them more time to do what they do best. The initial roll out of smartphones and tablets for Police is now complete. In Counties Manukau this will save more than 73,000 Police hours per year – nationwide the figure is more than half a million.

An iPlod on the beat is worth far more than one in the office.


Milk price edges up

July 3, 2013

The trade weighted price of milk increased .7% in this morning’s GlobalDairyTrade auction.

GDT Trade Weighted Index Changes

 

gdt 2.7

The price of anhydrous milk fat increased 1.2%; butter was down 5.7%; butter milk powder rose 6%; cheddar dropped 3.7%; rennet casein increased 7.9% skim milk powder was up by 3.1% and whole milk powder inched up .1%.


We’re all responsible for water quality

July 3, 2013

The Green party is blaming intensified dairying for a deterioration in water quality noted in the release of the Ministry of Health’s annual drinking water survey.

But Federated Farmers chief executive Conor English says the rural sector is only partly to blame for the drop in quality.

“The farming community accepts that farming has an impact on the environment, we take that very seriously, and we’ve invested enormous amounts of money in mitigating whatever our impacts are, but we want an open and honest discussion about water quality.”

Mr English said water quality was something urban dwellers should take equal responsibility for.

“Every New Zealander needs to take responsibility for their environmental impact. It doesn’t matter where you live. . .

He said it was unfair to lay the blame on farmers every time beaches and rivers are closed in cities.

“There are no cows living in Wellington, there are no cows living in Auckland.” . . .

Saying you’re contributing to problems too won’t solve them.

But English is right.

We’re all responsible for water quality.

Some FAQs and a link to the full report are here


Farm subsidies transfer cash to rich

July 3, 2013

George Monbiot says farming subsidies are a transfer of cash to the rich.

The main subsidy, the single farm payment, is doled out by the hectare. The more land you own or rent, the more money you receive. . .

When our government says “we must help the farmers”, it means “we must help the 0.1%”. Most of the land here is owned by exceedingly wealthy people. Some of them are millionaires from elsewhere: sheikhs, oligarchs and mining magnates who own vast estates in this country. Although they might pay no taxes in the UK, they receive millions in farm subsidies. They are the world’s most successful benefit tourists. Yet, amid the manufactured terror of immigrants living off British welfare payments, we scarcely hear a word said against them. . .

Thanks in large part to subsidies, the value of farmland in the UK has tripled in 10 years: it has risen faster than almost any other speculative asset. . .

An uncapped subsidy system damages the interests of small farmers. It reinforces the economies of scale enjoyed by the biggest landlords, helping them to drive the small producers out of business. . .

He could have added that subsidies  distort the usual rules of supply and demand, increase inefficiencies, limit choice and add costs for consumers, protect poor performers from their own folly and create unfair competition for non-subsidised produce.

Most New Zealand farmers were somewhat less than enthusiastic about being dragged into the real world by the Lange-Douglas government in the mid 1980s but I haven’t met a single one who would want to go back to subsidies.

It’s better to face the market and prosper, or not, as a result of your own efforts than be at the mercy of political and bureaucratic whim.

Hat tip: Tim Worstall


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